Supersonic Flying Wing

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    Aug 30, 2012 11:11 PM GMT
    For my fellow nerds.

    http://www.space.com/17393-supersonic-flying-wing-nasa.html
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    Aug 30, 2012 11:30 PM GMT
    Space travel will be commercially available and affordable before his design is finished. He should work on giving that plane the ability to do orbital flights like SpaceX and Virgin Galactic.
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    Aug 31, 2012 12:00 AM GMT
    True, but the concept is pretty awesome. The hypersonic flights is far more exciting despite the recent results
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    Aug 31, 2012 4:26 AM GMT
    I always found the term "flying wing" to be oddly redundant. Aren't ALL wings supposed to fly?
  • mustangd

    Posts: 434

    Aug 31, 2012 4:40 AM GMT
    JustplainAlex saidTrue, but the concept is pretty awesome. The hypersonic flights is far more exciting despite the recent results


    an interesting pespective, by moving 90 degrees, it brings into play a different wing geometry, one set for subsonic, and the right angled wing, supersonic.
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    Aug 31, 2012 5:25 AM GMT
    mustangd said
    JustplainAlex saidTrue, but the concept is pretty awesome. The hypersonic flights is far more exciting despite the recent results


    an interesting pespective, by moving 90 degrees, it brings into play a different wing geometry, one set for subsonic, and the right angled wing, supersonic.


    I'd love to see a video simulation for it. There has been more research in recent years concerning changing wing configuration during flight but I think this one is the most drastic.
  • fitartistsf

    Posts: 638

    Aug 31, 2012 7:05 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI always found the term "flying wing" to be oddly redundant. Aren't ALL wings supposed to fly?


    I currently work at Edwards Air Force Base, here in Southern California, where the flying wing, both the propeller driven and jet versions was tested here in the late 1940s and ultimately not put into production, after it was found to be unstable under human control. (reaction times to variables while in flight was just not fast enough with human pilots) In fact Glenn Edwards was the captain of the flying wing that crashed in 1949 which facilitated the renaming of the base after him. "Flying wing" only denotes the fact that there is no discernible fuselage. With the advent of more powerful computers over the decades, which allowed faster compensation and control than humans could attain, and better control surfaces and design, the flying wing, which is now known as the B2, was able to be put into production with much success.
    Working in the graphics dept. of the Public affairs office of the base as I do, I come across the images of both the flying wings from the 40s and the B2, on an almost daily basis. And to be driving across the base whether in the morning coming to work, or driving home at night, and seeing the B2 flyover is an awesome sight... Kinda makes you believe in UFOs.... LOL
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    Aug 31, 2012 7:36 AM GMT
    Trollileo said
    Art_Deco saidI always found the term "flying wing" to be oddly redundant. Aren't ALL wings supposed to fly?
    Penguins. Ostriches. Emus.


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  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Aug 31, 2012 8:13 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI always found the term "flying wing" to be oddly redundant. Aren't ALL wings supposed to fly?


    There has been updates since your high school buddies the Wright brother'sicon_idea.gificon_lol.gif
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    Aug 31, 2012 11:21 AM GMT
    fitartistsf said
    Art_Deco saidI always found the term "flying wing" to be oddly redundant. Aren't ALL wings supposed to fly?


    I currently work at Edwards Air Force Base, here in Southern California, where the flying wing, both the propeller driven and jet versions was tested here in the late 1940s and ultimately not put into production, after it was found to be unstable under human control. (reaction times to variables while in flight was just not fast enough with human pilots) In fact Glenn Edwards was the captain of the flying wing that crashed in 1949 which facilitated the renaming of the base after him. "Flying wing" only denotes the fact that there is no discernible fuselage. With the advent of more powerful computers over the decades, which allowed faster compensation and control than humans could attain, and better control surfaces and design, the flying wing, which is now known as the B2, was able to be put into production with much success.
    Working in the graphics dept. of the Public affairs office of the base as I do, I come across the images of both the flying wings from the 40s and the B2, on an almost daily basis. And to be driving across the base whether in the morning coming to work, or driving home at night, and seeing the B2 flyover is an awesome sight... Kinda makes you believe in UFOs.... LOL

    The Germans also did development work on flying wings during WWII. And I remember in the mid-1950s seeing newsreels featuring flying wing prototypes as a futuristic possibility. I don't know whether that message was coming from the USAF, or some news organization using older film of the flying wing to promote the general story of advanced aviation, because by then I think the project was effectively dead.

    I also believe the prop version was developed first as an interim step to prove the feasibility of the airframe concept, since jet engines were still new to aviation and work on suitable ones for the wing configuration was lagging. The prop prototypes barely had enough power to get airborne and flew very poorly. The later jet experimentals did better, but were difficult to control in the air by human reflexes alone, as you say, and this fundamental instability doomed the project.

    But my semantic observation remains, that man-made wings are intended to fly, making the term "flying wing" a bit redundant to my mind.
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    Aug 31, 2012 11:22 AM GMT
    Stuttershock said
    Trollileo said
    Art_Deco saidI always found the term "flying wing" to be oddly redundant. Aren't ALL wings supposed to fly?
    Penguins. Ostriches. Emus.

    Buffalo

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