Stanford Cooling Glove Better than Steroids (video)

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    Aug 31, 2012 5:47 PM GMT
    http://medgadget.com/2012/08/stanford-cooling-glove-more-dope-than-steroids-video.html

    Even in prototype form, the researchers’ device proved enormously efficient at altering body temperature. The glove’s early successes were actually in increasing the core temperature of surgery patients recovering from anesthesia.

    “We built a silly device, took it over to the recovery room and, lo and behold, it worked beyond our wildest imaginations,” Heller explained. “Whereas it was taking them hours to re-warm patients coming into the recovery room, we were doing it in eight, nine minutes.”

    But the glove’s effects on athletic performance didn’t become apparent until the researchers began using the glove to cool a member of the lab – the confessed “gym rat” and frequent coauthor Vinh Cao – between sets of pull-ups. The glove seemed to nearly erase his muscle fatigue; after multiple rounds, cooling allowed him to do just as many pull-ups as he did the first time around. So the researchers started cooling him after every other set of pull-ups.

    “Then in the next six weeks he went from doing 180 pull-ups total to over 620,” said Heller. “That was a rate of physical performance improvement that was just unprecedented.”

    The researchers applied the cooling method to other types of exercise – bench press, running, cycling. In every case, rates of gain in recovery were dramatic, without any evidence of the body being damaged by overwork – hence the “better than steroids” claim. Versions of the glove have since been adopted by the Stanford football and track and field teams, as well as other college athletics programs, the San Francisco 49ers, the Oakland Raiders and Manchester United soccer club.


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    Aug 31, 2012 5:57 PM GMT
    Huhhhh?
    Does this mean I need to start carrying an oven mit and a bag of ice to the gym? icon_confused.gif
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    Aug 31, 2012 6:16 PM GMT
    Scruffypup saidHuhhhh?
    Does this mean I need to start carrying an oven mit and a bag of ice to the gym? icon_confused.gif


    Nope. Cryotherapy devices are commercially available and not that expensive.

    38142_image.jpg

    http://www.physioroom.com/catalog/Cryotherapy/2272.html
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    Aug 31, 2012 6:25 PM GMT
    So fucking cool
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    Aug 31, 2012 6:52 PM GMT
    gimme dat
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    Aug 31, 2012 6:57 PM GMT
    I'm rather skeptical about this for some specific reasons.

    While Dr Heller PhD is esteemed, I see no reference to control groups when doing studies and the information seems anecdotal without measuring or accounting for correlational variables. Additionally, there's no long term testing as to the effects of this process, so I'd hate to utilize this technology only to find out later that an unforeseen side effect, perhaps permanent damage or deficit, could happen.

    I'm not saying that it's not true, but there have been many miracles of past medicine that have later turned out to have significant or deadly side effects that were neither apparent or even capable of being diagnosed at the time.

    One of many examples would be X-Rays. Viewed as a miracle of modern science, ended up cause the deaths and disfigurement of thousands before safer levels (there's no such thing as a perfectly safe level) and other precautions were determined. Now there are many other alternatives to X-rays and even when x-ray are prescribed, they (should) be tracking thier frequency of use. Why do you think that when it's as simple as a tooth X-ray, they throw a lead vest on you, and the technician leaves the room for the few milliseconds that it's on.

    All my reasonable skepticism notwithstanding, this could be an interesting medical development.

    Note that they never mentioned muscle growth/mass*, only endurance and fatigue. (I mention this as a specifically aesthetic issue, since a significant part of the strength/health paradigm in the gay community is not merely being strong (which would be fine if achievement in sport is your only goal) but looking strong/buff.

    * this is based on the full Stanford article and not merely the excerpt referenced in the OP's link.
  • fitartistsf

    Posts: 638

    Aug 31, 2012 7:28 PM GMT
    I'm definitely gonna show this video to my trainer, and see what she says about the whole subject. She's been a bodybuilder and a trainer for almost 30 years, delving into the mechanics and science of supplements, "juice", any of that stuff, so we'll see what she says....
  • InsatiableBlo...

    Posts: 442

    Aug 31, 2012 7:44 PM GMT
    So its okay to "cheat" in sports using the Stanford Cooling Glove but not okay to use steroids?

    This is why there should be no ban on performance enhancers. There's always going to be some sort of "advantage" from something whether it be caffeine, creatine, adderall, HGH, steroids, or blood doping. Everybody is looking for their own edge in classroom, the office, or playing field. Plus, wouldn't it be great to be even better at what your already good at?

    Performance enhancers should really be called performance enablers, because they enable us to reach new heights.
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    Aug 31, 2012 7:45 PM GMT
    InsatiableBloom saidSo its okay to "cheat" in sports using the Stanford Cooling Glove but not okay to use steroids?

    This is why there should be no ban on performance enhancers. There's always going to be some sort of "advantage" from something whether it be caffeine, creatine, adderall, HGH, steroids, or blood doping.

    Agreed. I really don't get why prohormones are legal and steroids aren't.
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    Aug 31, 2012 8:41 PM GMT
    InsatiableBloom saidSo its okay to "cheat" in sports using the Stanford Cooling Glove but not okay to use steroids?


    Do you think the two methods they are in the same league? I don't. Conceivably, someone could have discovered a primitive form of this cooling benefit while man was still living in caves (e.g. by putting his palms against a cold wall or shoving his hands in a cold stream). The same cannot be said of injecting performance enhancing chemicals into the muscles.
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    Aug 31, 2012 8:47 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    InsatiableBloom saidSo its okay to "cheat" in sports using the Stanford Cooling Glove but not okay to use steroids?


    Do you think the two methods they are in the same league? I don't. Conceivably, someone could have discovered a primitive form of this cooling benefit while man was still living in caves (e.g. by putting his palms against a cold wall or shoving his hands in a cold stream). The same cannot be said of injecting performance enhancing chemicals into the muscles.


    Besides, we know that if used incorrectly both HGH and steroids can cause long-term, permanent medical side effects. Certain drugs are available on the market to allow those with pre-existing hormonal issues to balance them out.
  • InsatiableBlo...

    Posts: 442

    Aug 31, 2012 8:54 PM GMT
    Matt_TO said
    Ex_Mil8 said
    InsatiableBloom saidSo its okay to "cheat" in sports using the Stanford Cooling Glove but not okay to use steroids?


    Do you think the two methods they are in the same league? I don't. Conceivably, someone could have discovered a primitive form of this cooling benefit while man was still living in caves (e.g. by putting his palms against a cold wall or shoving his hands in a cold stream). The same cannot be said of injecting performance enhancing chemicals into the muscles.


    Besides, we know that if used incorrectly both HGH and steroids can cause long-term, permanent medical side effects. Certain drugs are available on the market to allow those with pre-existing hormonal issues to balance them out.


    -----

    Definitely in the same league. Performance enhancement is performance enhancement. And yes, steroids can cause long term side effects when used incorrectly but anything in excess can cause permanent damage. Too much water intake can cause kidney failure.
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    Aug 31, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    Ohhh, this is intriguing!

    I wonder if the same principle applies to lowering the body temperature through other methods too. I know that some professional athletes jump into a bin full of ice cold water after intense work-outs/games to drastically reduce recovery time also.

    Cryotheraphy devices such as these:

    38142_image.jpg

    are surely a marketing ploy if so, as the same effects should be able to be replicated no matter the chosen method for body cooling, no?

    If not, for some reason (pressure level?), then I wonder if cryotheraphy devices already on the market work the whole body also.

    Hmmmm