Do other languages have a term for a "blue moon"?

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    Sep 01, 2012 1:56 PM GMT
    Just wondering.

    EDIT: I mean, do other cultures take note of the astronomical event of the "blue moon" and give it a name, like English calls it a blue moon? What name do they call it, if they do? And do they use that term in an expression that means only once is a great while?
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    Sep 01, 2012 5:14 PM GMT
    An easy way to find out would be to search for 'Blue Moon' in wikipedia, pull up the article and then take a look at all the language options on the left hand side.

    It stands to reason that if the term exists in other languages it would also have a wiki entry describing it.
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    Sep 01, 2012 5:17 PM GMT
    Maybe literal translations but in terms of the colloquial meaning, probably not but who knows.
    I'm coming from the perspective of it being used like "once in a blue moon".
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    Sep 01, 2012 5:51 PM GMT
    As in the actual event or the idiomatic expression (i.e. once in a blue moon)?

    Fortunately in Spanish the translation is literal luna azul or segunda luna llena (second full moon). The idiom I've always heard is de higos a brevas.

    Russian also translates it literally - голубая луна (golubaya luna).
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    Sep 01, 2012 6:13 PM GMT
    The closest thing in Hebrew is Rosh Chodesh.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosh_Chodesh
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    Sep 01, 2012 6:18 PM GMT
    In french we translatedthe expression litterally. Blue moon became "lune bleue". In Japanese they say the english "blue moon" or rather "burū mūn"
  • Bullone

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    Sep 01, 2012 6:20 PM GMT
    In spanish, it is straight forward as well: Luna Azul
  • calibro

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    Sep 01, 2012 6:35 PM GMT
    LIEV saidThe closest thing in Hebrew is Rosh Chodesh.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosh_Chodesh


    those aren't even close
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    Sep 01, 2012 6:47 PM GMT
    I find the Italian idiomatic expression of "once in a blue moon" interesting, "Ogni morte di papa", "every time a pope dies".

    The French, I believe, has the expression tous les 36 du mois (literally, every 36th day of the month).

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    Sep 01, 2012 6:52 PM GMT
    powerhouseME saidI find the Italian idiomatic expression of "once in a blue moon" interesting, "Ogni morte di papa", "every time a pope dies".

    The French, I believe, has the expression tous les 36 du mois (literally, every 36th day of the month).



    That's right icon_smile.gif
    My mum always says "tous les 36 du mois"
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    Sep 01, 2012 7:32 PM GMT
    Stuttershock saidAn easy way to find out would be to search for 'Blue Moon' in wikipedia, pull up the article and then take a look at all the language options on the left hand side.

    It stands to reason that if the term exists in other languages it would also have a wiki entry describing it.

    That just translates the article into those languages. It does change the article to address the question.
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    Sep 01, 2012 11:00 PM GMT
    Caslon20000 said
    Stuttershock saidAn easy way to find out would be to search for 'Blue Moon' in wikipedia, pull up the article and then take a look at all the language options on the left hand side.

    It stands to reason that if the term exists in other languages it would also have a wiki entry describing it.

    That just translates the article into those languages. It does change the article to address the question.


    He means that you can find out the translation of "blue moon" in various languages through that tab because the title of the article would be the word.
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    Sep 01, 2012 11:05 PM GMT
    Arabic: Qamr al-Azaraq.
    Persian: Qalmeh Abi.

    I dunno what it is in Turkish. icon_neutral.gif
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    Sep 01, 2012 11:12 PM GMT
    Translation in most of the Romance languages:

    Spanish - luna azul
    Portuguese - lua azul
    Catalan/Valencian - lluna blava
    Galician - lúa azul
    French - lune bleue
    Italian - luna blu
    Romanian - lună albastră
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    Sep 01, 2012 11:21 PM GMT
    nicodegallo saidTranslation in most of the Romance languages:

    Spanish - luna azul
    Portuguese - lua azul
    Catalan - lluna blava
    Galician - lúa azul
    French - lune bleue
    Italian - luna blu
    Romanian - lună albastră


    Albastra? Maybe it's a false cognate or something but alabaster in English means White from the Derivative in Greek Alabastros. icon_surprised.gif

    Speaking of Greek, it's "Μπλε φεγγάρι" which is basically pronounced: "Ble Pheggari".

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    Sep 01, 2012 11:24 PM GMT
    ParadiseLost said
    nicodegallo saidTranslation in most of the Romance languages:

    Spanish - luna azul
    Portuguese - lua azul
    Catalan - lluna blava
    Galician - lúa azul
    French - lune bleue
    Italian - luna blu
    Romanian - lună albastră


    Albastra? Maybe it's a false cognate or something but alabaster in English means White from the Derivative in Greek Alabastros. icon_surprised.gif

    Speaking of Greek, it's "Μπλε φεγγάρι" which is basically pronounced: "Ble Pheggari".



    Albastru means only blue in Romanian. Apparently it comes from the Latin word albus. However, so does the Romanian word for white, which is alb.

    Anyway, it seems most of the Iberian Romance languages chose the Arabic/Persian derivatives of azul while the others took the Germanic word blue.
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    Sep 01, 2012 11:30 PM GMT
    nicodegallo said
    ParadiseLost said
    nicodegallo saidTranslation in most of the Romance languages:

    Spanish - luna azul
    Portuguese - lua azul
    Catalan - lluna blava
    Galician - lúa azul
    French - lune bleue
    Italian - luna blu
    Romanian - lună albastră


    Albastra? Maybe it's a false cognate or something but alabaster in English means White from the Derivative in Greek Alabastros. icon_surprised.gif

    Speaking of Greek, it's "Μπλε φεγγάρι" which is basically pronounced: "Ble Pheggari".



    Albastru means only blue in Romanian. Apparently it comes from the Latin word albus. However, so does the Romanian word for white, which is alb.


    Ooo.. how interesting. icon_smile.gif Albus. It comes from the ancient PIE word Albos. Similarly Alphos in Ancient Greek. I didn't know that. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 02, 2012 6:20 AM GMT
    Slavic languages

    Russian - голубая луна (golubaya luna)
    Ukrainian - блакитний місяць (blakytny misyats')
    Belarusian - блакітная месяц (blakitnaya mesyat)

    Czech - modrý měsíc
    Slovak - modrý mesiac
    Polish - niebieski księżyc

    Bulgarian - синя луна (sinya luna)
    Macedonian - сина месечина (sina mesechina)
    Croatian - plavi mjesec (Serbian, Bosnian, Montenegrin translations same?)
    Slovenian - modra luna