Too analytical blessing/curse

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    Sep 03, 2012 10:52 AM GMT
    I experience, joy, anger, grief etc but since my teen years I was conditioned to basically be calm, cool and think things through. It's how I survived being on the streets(literally and somewhat fig) and got out of violent situations. it's hard for me to connect with people because of my thinking process. I'm not a genius, I just shut down my emotions when necessary to make a decision without distractions.

    If my friends are going through something bad, i'm not gonna tell them that "things will just get better" since I don't really know if they will. I will say that "they might be able to make it better if given the opportunity and advise them if i can"

    And I normally look out for what is smart strategically. It makes more sense for me to study for a test than grieve a family death or even if I hate the person i'm working with or w.e if they have the skills I need then that's what is more important.

    I do comprehend emotional intelligence but even then I use that option strategically..see what I mean? lol

    but yeah this post might make me seem more of an oddball, but most of us INTJ's are so it's cool.

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    Sep 03, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    You're a scientist, aren't you?
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    Sep 03, 2012 2:27 PM GMT
    What you're describing does not sound "too analytical". It's actually a very masculine trait to not emote at every chance. It doesn't mean you need to run an algorithm for every situation but there's nothing wrong with being calm. As you go on with your career and become a leader, you will need to develop your own communication style that allows you to connect with people so that you're not seen as aloof and disengaged. But there are books on that. icon_wink.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Sep 03, 2012 2:29 PM GMT
    You should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.
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    Sep 03, 2012 2:37 PM GMT
    That's the way to go.
  • calibro

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    Sep 03, 2012 2:39 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    win
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:51 AM GMT
    Myol saidWhat you're describing does not sound "too analytical". It's actually a very masculine trait to not emote at every chance. It doesn't mean you need to run an algorithm for every situation but there's nothing wrong with being calm. As you go on with your career and become a leader, you will need to develop your own communication style that allows you to connect with people so that you're not seen as aloof and disengaged. But there are books on that. icon_wink.gif


    Yeah hence the free hugs campaign. I see that as sensitivity training and I enjoy doing it.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:52 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidYou're a scientist, aren't you?


    INTJ- Scientist. Ironically my career aspirations are more of an ISTJ(detective)
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:57 AM GMT
    tmac said I experience, joy, anger, grief etc but since my teen years I was conditioned to basically be calm, cool and think things through. It's how I survived being on the streets(literally and somewhat fig) and got out of violent situations. it's hard for me to connect with people because of my thinking process. I'm not a genius, I just shut down my emotions when necessary to make a decision without distractions.

    If my friends are going through something bad, i'm not gonna tell them that "things will just get better" since I don't really know if they will. I will say that "they might be able to make it better if given the opportunity and advise them if i can"

    And I normally look out for what is smart strategically. It makes more sense for me to study for a test than grieve a family death or even if I hate the person i'm working with or w.e if they have the skills I need then that's what is more important.

    I do comprehend emotional intelligence but even then I use that option strategically..see what I mean? lol

    but yeah this post might make me seem more of an oddball, but most of us INTJ's are so it's cool.



    Our thoughts become are greatest distractions,
    Barring us from being observant to the other things,
    Which our eyes and minds cannot decipher.

    We're used to saying the world in one way,
    Always calculating,
    Logic layered on Pro-Logic,
    Conceptualizing our methods,
    Looking life through a refractive lens.

    But there is great joy in seeing color,
    Uniting as one again,
    Vibrations and wavelengths,
    Which tell a story different,
    Than the one rent apart.

    It takes time for one to loosen,
    The restrictions and conditions privy,
    To help us engage and explore,
    The world in different, original, and creative ways.

    The greatest of joys,
    The leap.
    The greatest of lessons,
    The fall.

    We learn much not by just watching,
    But becoming active within the dialog,
    Becoming a voice in the choir,
    Singing the Harmonies of Life.

    For Sentience is not always Having,
    All the correlations and answers,
    Being sentience imparts curiosity,
    Which fuels the fire of our hearts desires.
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    Sep 04, 2012 2:03 AM GMT
    What is ISJT or whatever you brought up? I think it's good to have that technique for situations that require them, but a lot of situations also need you to put some emotion into them. It's a balance of both that will get the best result.
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    Sep 04, 2012 2:09 AM GMT
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    I actually made a personal blog about my life in 2010. Currently preparing for season 3. I don't know the kind of person I will be 10 years from now but it would be a shame if I rolled my eyes because me at 32 would not have made it if not for my character at 22 regardless of w.e flaws.
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    Sep 04, 2012 4:10 AM GMT
    tmac said
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    I actually made a personal blog about my life in 2010. Currently preparing for season 3. I don't know the kind of person I will be 10 years from now but it would be a shame if I rolled my eyes because me at 32 would not have made it if not for my character at 22 regardless of w.e flaws.


    Quoted for truth.
  • FuriousGeorge

    Posts: 181

    Sep 04, 2012 4:46 AM GMT
    I'm an INTJ too, haha. Took the test after several years and several new experiences, and I still came out the same. I guess I am what I am.
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    Sep 04, 2012 5:03 AM GMT
    calibro said
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    win


    Alright, I'll grant you that the style, excessive gravity and feigned precociousness are sophomoric.

    But there actually are problems that stem from excessively analytic behavior, especially in the interpersonal sphere. If you can't emote well, even when you'd really like to, it can be a very painful thing. I'm much better at it with friendships than in intimate relationships due to practice, and that problem is a source of deep frustration. It is a weakness with which I struggle.

    Then again, I'm not sure if the intent of the OP is to highlight that issue so much as lord his supposed super-rationality over others.
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    Sep 04, 2012 10:42 AM GMT
    Objective thinking=Critical thinking

    In life we experience pain and growth. Pain is what evokes our humanistic side, our ability to sympathize and empathize with others. Without it we can't come close to achieving compassion. If we never experience pain for whatever reason, avoidance or sedation, we don't grow. However, if we are always caught up in our subjective pain, we stay in our self-centered egos.

    The middle path gets narrower the longer you walk it.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:19 PM GMT
    principal0 said
    calibro said
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    win


    Alright, I'll grant you that the style, excessive gravity and feigned precociousness are sophomoric.

    But there actually are problems that stem from excessively analytic behavior, especially in the interpersonal sphere. If you can't emote well, even when you'd really like to, it can be a very painful thing. I'm much better at it with friendships than in intimate relationships due to practice, and that problem is a source of deep frustration. It is a weakness with which I struggle.

    Then again, I'm not sure if the intent of the OP is to highlight that issue so much as lord his supposed super-rationality over others.


    I'm saying that it's like a double edge sword because it's hard for me to find that balance. it's much easier for me to be more affectionate to my friends if we bonded for a long time. however dating wise there is normally a disconnect because I can't force myself to feel the way that most people do when they're in the beginning stages of dating.
    (my bf is pretty understanding though so we're trying to find a middle ground since we seem to be on two extremes

    and no I don't think i'm superior in anyway. Like I said i'm not a genius lol.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Sep 04, 2012 2:26 PM GMT
    tmac said
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    I actually made a personal blog about my life in 2010. Currently preparing for season 3. I don't know the kind of person I will be 10 years from now but it would be a shame if I rolled my eyes because me at 32 would not have made it if not for my character at 22 regardless of w.e flaws.


    Go back and look at school yearbooks from when you were 12. Sure those years paved the way, but do really take yourself so seriously that you wouldn't want to roll your eyes when you look back???

    I'm 33 and when I look back at 22, I'm proud of my accomplishments but also bemused by how neurotic I was! Trust me, that overly self analytical mindset fades as you get older, and you start to see the bigger picture.

    I guess some people spend their whole lives over analyzing themselves, but that just screams big ego with stunted maturity to me. You'll always want to examine yourself, but being too analytical can blind you to the simple truths.
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    Sep 04, 2012 3:05 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    tmac said
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    I actually made a personal blog about my life in 2010. Currently preparing for season 3. I don't know the kind of person I will be 10 years from now but it would be a shame if I rolled my eyes because me at 32 would not have made it if not for my character at 22 regardless of w.e flaws.


    Go back and look at school yearbooks from when you were 12. Sure those years paved the way, but do really take yourself so seriously that you wouldn't want to roll your eyes when you look back???

    I'm 33 and when I look back at 22, I'm proud of my accomplishments but also bemused by how neurotic I was! Trust me, that overly self analytical mindset fades as you get older, and you start to see the bigger picture.

    I guess some people spend their whole lives over analyzing themselves, but that just screams big ego with stunted maturity to me. You'll always want to examine yourself, but being too analytical can blind you to the simple truths.


    I still have my yearbook from JHS and HS days. I like going through them. I don't roll my eyes though but we see things differently brotha which is perfectly fine. icon_biggrin.gif

    Furiousgeorge somewhat mentioned he hasn't really changed much throughout the years.

    The detective I worked for is in his 50's . Very meticulous and analytical but he comes from NYPD, and Military background so I believe it's just a way of life based on your conditioning not just about aging.

    Looking at the bigger picture to me is looking at the whole story. Trying to picture how one action can play a role in future implications. I believe that's something done by analyzing but I also agree 100% that people who over analyze can be blind to the bottom line.

  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Sep 04, 2012 3:47 PM GMT
    tmac said
    HottJoe said
    tmac said
    HottJoe saidYou should paste what you've written to a file and reread it in ten years. Like anyone else over the age of 22, you will likely roll your eyes.


    I actually made a personal blog about my life in 2010. Currently preparing for season 3. I don't know the kind of person I will be 10 years from now but it would be a shame if I rolled my eyes because me at 32 would not have made it if not for my character at 22 regardless of w.e flaws.


    Go back and look at school yearbooks from when you were 12. Sure those years paved the way, but do really take yourself so seriously that you wouldn't want to roll your eyes when you look back???

    I'm 33 and when I look back at 22, I'm proud of my accomplishments but also bemused by how neurotic I was! Trust me, that overly self analytical mindset fades as you get older, and you start to see the bigger picture.

    I guess some people spend their whole lives over analyzing themselves, but that just screams big ego with stunted maturity to me. You'll always want to examine yourself, but being too analytical can blind you to the simple truths.


    I still have my yearbook from JHS and HS days. I like going through them. I don't roll my eyes though but we see things differently brotha which is perfectly fine. icon_biggrin.gif

    Furiousgeorge somewhat mentioned he hasn't really changed much throughout the years.

    The detective I worked for is in his 50's . Very meticulous and analytical but he comes from NYPD, and Military background so I believe it's just a way of life based on your conditioning not just about aging.

    Looking at the bigger picture to me is looking at the whole story. Trying to picture how one action can play a role in future implications. I believe that's something done by analyzing but I also agree 100% that people who over analyze can be blind to the bottom line.



    Well, Furiousgeorge might always be furious. We each have a different path, and you should always stick to what you're passionate about. You seem smart and well grounded. I bet you'll go places. icon_smile.gif
  • FuriousGeorge

    Posts: 181

    Sep 04, 2012 4:35 PM GMT
    Furious George will always be furious!

    Furiousgeorge2.JPG

    I've changed quite a bit in my demeanor, how I interact with other people, how I deal with situations, etc. But somehow at my core I still like to look at things in a certain way. Let's be real here though; Myers-Briggs isn't the beginning, middle, and end of human psychology. Just turn that calm, objective perception inward and work on the issues you find puzzling about yourself. We can talk about this via email if you want; I have some experience with this.
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    Sep 04, 2012 5:06 PM GMT
    One of the downsides of being a hyper-analytical person is when we turn our scrutiny on ourselves.

    I'm guilty of holding my "self" under the microscope, trying to find how I can improve, and where my flaws are, and what caused me to develop certain bad habits, and what events created hangups...enough.

    You are what you are. Your gifts are not curses, unless they run out of control. You use your reason to solve problems. There are others who use their emotions to solve problems.

    I will say that being INTJ myself, I have a feeling others don't relate to me/us easily. After watching SHERLOCK on PBS, Mr. Holmes definitely falls into this category. Scientific, logical, analytical, inquisitive, quite...odd. He has problems relating to people. Guilty here!

    Bars, gyms, other public meeting places overwhelm me and I love my quiet time in an intimate setting, absorbing and digesting ideas. I'm no genius either...it's just the way I am, but I don't think using that as an excuse from pushing our boundaries.

    Be gentle with your self judgement, but push yourself.