Four year degrees are a waste of time

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    Sep 04, 2012 12:08 AM GMT
    I'm thinking about dropping out of school and picking up a trade. My friend who graduated high school like five years before me went straight to trade school after he graduated. Makes waaaaaaay more $$$$$ then the pretentious douchebags who flaunt their meaningless degrees in everyone's faces. It's just a piece of papericon_rolleyes.gif
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    Sep 04, 2012 12:14 AM GMT
    The success of one person who went to trade school compared to your friends who have a four year degree does not necessarily indicate a trend.
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    Sep 04, 2012 12:21 AM GMT
    I dropped college after 2.5 years (with a 3.86 GPA) and now make much more than most of my former classmates who graduated...and work in the field of study that I pursued (which is more than I can say for most of them).

    Then there are those few who went on to graduate school and got their master's, some even got it Piled High and Deep (Phd). Those are the ones who REALLY make the bucks.
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    Sep 04, 2012 12:21 AM GMT
    I never understood people who want to drop out of college. It's the best experience in life, meet tons of people, doing new things, partying, getting laid. Not to mention your income will usually be hire with a four year degree
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    Sep 04, 2012 12:23 AM GMT
    ohioguy12 saidI never understood people who want to drop out of college.
    Mine is easy to understand. I only did college for the student loans for flight training. My company had tuition reimbursement, so that was no problem there; but flight students got shitloads of cash to pay for airplane rental and flight instructor costs.

    In short, I figured how to realize my childhood dream, and made it happen. College was not a necessity - just a catapult. icon_cool.gif
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    Sep 04, 2012 12:28 AM GMT
    i just graduated in May. . and the job I got now, i wouldn't have been able to get if i didnt have a college degree.. i wouldn't be makin the money im makin without it. i wouldnt have my own place. im not sayin im super rich, burnin down the world, but i can support myself pretty damn good now. no regrets
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    Going to school now may be the best way to wait out this recession. You could get a paid intership or take trade classes during the summer for work experience and by the time you graduate, the market will hopefully be much better. College is also very good for networking, even if you're not super outgoing. Based on some of your previous posts, I would really advise you finish your college career. It's not a dig, I just think you could benefit from some of the socialization before you hit primetime. There are fewer support systems in the real world than in college.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:10 AM GMT
    I think it really depends on finding something you love to do.

    PaulFlexes found something he loves that didn't require a degree.Some people find a career they love that does require a degree.

    Money is important, but it's not the only thing you need to think about in your decision of whether or not you want to stay in college.

    Plus, you need to look at the job market for the trade you are trying to pursue. Will there be jobs available in the location you want to live?

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    Sep 04, 2012 1:16 AM GMT
    Higher education is just the latest burst bubble.

    Just as people are underwater with over-valued homes, now young people are over-burdened with degrees that aren't even worth the paper they're printed on.

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    Sep 04, 2012 1:19 AM GMT
    You're not giving us enough info to intelligently comment on.

    What field are you considering? What is your major?

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    Sep 04, 2012 1:21 AM GMT
    Some make it without a college degree. Most do NOT. Yes degrees are expensive but it opens doors for you that otherwise wouldn't be available. I would suggest you think long and hard about this decision. It can and will impact the rest of your life.
  • robevans912

    Posts: 87

    Sep 04, 2012 1:24 AM GMT
    Unless you're a technically gifted wunderkind or an Oppenheimer-brain, I wouldn't even touch your resume without a degree listed on there.

    A degree says a bit more than just a field of study, there's more to it than just paper. Most of you who have earned degrees know what I am talking about.

    With that stated, whether or not a degree is important or not largely depends on your trade and/or the professional community you're about to venture in...
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:27 AM GMT
    No interviewer has ever, ever, ever asked me where I went to school.

    I could say I went to Atlantis U on my resume and no one would notice.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:28 AM GMT
    I'm pretty sure there's a Simpsons episode about this topic.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:30 AM GMT
    Well as one of the "pretentious douchebags", whom has an MA and a BS, and about to get his PhD within a year, I would say they are more than just a piece of paper. icon_cool.gif

    Don't ever give up on education!! You can always get your education of life by living it...but the knowledge you gain from an education, combined with real world accumulative knowledge is absolutely priceless. icon_wink.gif
    And trust me, all these low rent/blue collar jobs are things of the past. What's left will be working FOR you one day, and you'll be setting THEIR salaries. icon_biggrin.gif

    Tristan
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:32 AM GMT
    When most young people are underemployed at low-wage, low-skilled jobs they didn't need a degree for, it's hard to justify the expense of that magical college experience.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:33 AM GMT
    ohioguy12 saidI never understood people who want to drop out of college. It's the best experience in life, meet tons of people, doing new things, partying, getting laid. Not to mention your income will usually be hire with a four year degree


    Um, do you have your degree? "hire" vs. "higher". icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

    Just playing, but I just had to point it out, based on the subject at hand icon_razz.gif
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:38 AM GMT
    I need a Bachelor's degree for my dream career, so I'll gladly flaunt my 4 year degree. When you find a career that you love waking up to every day and actually have a passion for because you earned your 4 year degree, the money becomes meaningless.
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    Sep 04, 2012 1:45 AM GMT
    RobertF64 saidYou're not giving us enough info to intelligently comment on.

    What field are you considering? What is your major?



    I agree.

    Also, on another note, trade schools tend to teach you how to perform a specific trade or use a specific technology. Colleges and Universities don't necessarily teach you a specific trade or technology (though they can), but they teach you how to learn and develop over your career. I learned that a few years after I graduated with my BS in Computer Science. Do what you want. People are successful in both, or without even going to school. But it's not a waste of time. I'm doing pretty damn good financially myself.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Sep 04, 2012 2:14 AM GMT
    Boland92 saidI'm thinking about dropping out of school and picking up a trade. My friend who graduated high school like five years before me went straight to trade school after he graduated. Makes waaaaaaay more $$$$$ then the pretentious douchebags who flaunt their meaningless degrees in everyone's faces. It's just a piece of papericon_rolleyes.gif


    that's what people who aren't supposed to be in college think. and for the record, the word is "than" and not "then" icon_rolleyes.gif
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Sep 04, 2012 2:17 AM GMT
    Elusium saidHigher education is just the latest burst bubble.

    Just as people are underwater with over-valued homes, now young people are over-burdened with degrees that aren't even worth the paper they're printed on.



    that argument is so spurious. education can't be a bubble in the sense that when the bubble pops, the thing at the core of investment goes under, i.e., universities in this case. and clearly that's not happening. second, people with bachelor's as a whole still make more money than those without them. perhaps you should take an economics class so you can actually understand what a bubble is and how that the value of a college degree isn't "underwater" for the reason that it deals with lifetime earnings and not the cost of which you pay for it and immediate returns.
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    Sep 04, 2012 2:20 AM GMT
    We should really follow the French's Education and Healthcare systems. They're both free over there. Having a 4 yr degree doesn't guaranteed anything, now I pretty much understand why most employers prefer *Experience over *degrees. icon_neutral.gif
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    Sep 04, 2012 2:29 AM GMT
    Elusium saidHigher education is just the latest burst bubble.

    Just as people are underwater with over-valued homes, now young people are over-burdened with degrees that aren't even worth the paper they're printed on.

    I mainly hear this type of rant from people that have obscure/niche degrees in the arts. I think today's college students need to understand that it's totally ok to pursue their passion. BUT always have a back-up plan. So it might be a good idea to minor in Business, just in case.
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    Sep 04, 2012 2:33 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    Elusium saidHigher education is just the latest burst bubble.

    Just as people are underwater with over-valued homes, now young people are over-burdened with degrees that aren't even worth the paper they're printed on.

    I mainly hear this type of rant from people that have obscure/niche degrees in the arts. I think today's college students need to understand that it's totally ok to pursue their passion. BUT always have a back-up plan. So it might be a good idea to minor in Business, just in case.


    Agree. Education is an opportunity and a tool. It's not a guarantee nor a substitute for coming up with a plan.
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    Sep 04, 2012 2:41 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    Elusium saidHigher education is just the latest burst bubble.

    Just as people are underwater with over-valued homes, now young people are over-burdened with degrees that aren't even worth the paper they're printed on.

    I mainly hear this type of rant from people that have obscure/niche degrees in the arts. I think today's college students need to understand that it's totally ok to pursue their passion. BUT always have a back-up plan. So it might be a good idea to minor in Business, just in case.


    It's not a rant -- it's a new economic reality America isn't prepared to face. Yes, in in the post-2nd Great Depression U.S., everybody is supposed to be a businessman or Wall Street Trader now.

    If you got in on the Clinton-era prosperity, it's easy to dole out supply-side anodyne like this.

    If you didn't, a statement like this basically the equivalent of "Everything happens for a reason," which by the time you get to Plan X, Y, or Z, starts to sound a lot like "Anything can happen with a razor."