Soy Protein Used in "Natural" Foods Bathed in Toxic Solvent Hexane

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    Sep 06, 2012 2:45 AM GMT
    Soy Protein Used in "Natural" Foods Bathed in Toxic Solvent Hexane, a neurotoxic substance produced as a byproduct of gasoline refining.

    http://www.naturalnews.com/026303_soy_protein_hexane.html
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    Sep 06, 2012 4:43 AM GMT
    Prolly got some deadly dihydrogen oxide in there too.
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Sep 06, 2012 10:30 AM GMT
    Yet another reason to avoid that estrogenic ingredient!
  • Twenty_Someth...

    Posts: 1388

    Sep 06, 2012 11:00 AM GMT
    In a perfect world a liquid liquid extraction done with hexane should leave virtually no trace of the hexane in the oil being extracted... But human error and tendency to cut corners might screw some people when bad extractions are performed.

    Since aliphatic hydrocarbons and especially n-hexane can cause axonal neuropathy and degenerative function of peripheral nervous system they should just switch to a safer branched chain solvent instead.

    2-Methylpentane
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSZsLVRvh99g17SwEZl-l0
    is a stereo-isomer of hexane and would be a great alternative.
    It is already safely used in extractions involving pomegranate seed oil. It is far less toxic than n-hexane, but not as cost effective which is why it's not used as commonly...


    I don't eat too much soy, but good luck to those who do!
  • LuckyGuyKC

    Posts: 2080

    Sep 06, 2012 11:28 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said I went to a link on that page to learn more about which soy products are deemed as acceptable and which ones are not

    Here is a list, feel free to check it out:

    http://www.cornucopia.org/soysurvey/


    The Hexane story is old new ..... but this list is incredibly helpful. THX
  • GWriter

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    Sep 06, 2012 12:41 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    GWriter saidYet another reason to avoid that estrogenic ingredient!


    ^ Soy is a plant based food and is a phytoestrogen. Basically all plant based foods are phytoestrogenic in nature. It's not just soy.

    What a very misleading and unhelpful thing to say. You imply soy is no different than broccoli or asparagus.
    Here's the Wikipedia entry on phytoestrogens. Notice what keeps showing up at the top of the lists.
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytoestrogens#section_5
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    Sep 06, 2012 1:50 PM GMT
    GWriter said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    GWriter saidYet another reason to avoid that estrogenic ingredient!


    ^ Soy is a plant based food and is a phytoestrogen. Basically all plant based foods are phytoestrogenic in nature. It's not just soy.

    What a very misleading and unhelpful thing to say. You imply soy is no different than broccoli or asparagus.
    Here's the Wikipedia entry on phytoestrogens. Notice what keeps showing up at the top of the lists.
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytoestrogens#section_5


    Not at all misleading - much plant material that we find edible (and consider staple) contains phytoestrogens

    Nuts, Grains, Legumes are all high in phytoestrogens as well as fruits and sprouts (yes even Brocolli and Asparagus)

    Fancy a PB+J ?- the seeds in the multigrain bread contain phytoestrogen, so does the peanut butter, and likely even the Jelly was made with berries containing Phytoestrogens.

    How about Italian? Onion, Garlic, Tomato, all contain phytoestrogens.

    Something Fried? Oils made from pressed seeds contain phytoestrogens too..

    Damn - too many phytoestrogens in my diet - I need a beer.. More Bad news..
    Flavones are estrogenic too and found in alcoholic drinks, including whiskey, beer, and wine..

    I think MuchMoreThanMuscle has a point - maybe you missed it... There are so many estrogenic compounds in our day to day life that singling out Soy is a bit unfair -

    All things in moderation.
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    Sep 06, 2012 1:53 PM GMT
    Several years ago I purchased a hairloss shampoo created by a bio scientist. The active ingredient was copper peptides from soy protein. Shortly after using it I got serious carpel tunnel like pain in my hands and wrists that woke me up at night. The pain was excruciating. I stopped the shampoo and it went away. Took a few weeks, though.

    Thinking it just coincidence, months later I tried the shampoo again for a little bit and again the problem. I threw the bottles out and wrote to the scientist. He said he had never heard of this reaction.

    That was several years ago.

    The other day I purchased some shampoo at a local store. I started to have the same reaction. I looked at the ingredients and again soy protein.

    I don't know if it is that I have some allergy to soy or have been having a reaction to Hexane residue. It must have been absorbing through my hands and causing me the carpel tunnel pain.

    I am reading every label from now on and staying away from anything with soy.

    Strange thing is I haven't had any reaction to soy beans or soy food products.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 06, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    Its possible it isn't the soy - or even the hexane there.

    If you had a reaction to soy protein, its likely you would have the same reaction to the beans too..

    Do you have any other allergies?

    When you look at the ingredients in the product - there are often other chemicals in products like shampoos that cause reactions.. Colors and perfumes can cause adverse reactions in people too..
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    Sep 06, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    I don't eat soy as I have weird reactions too it (digestive problems, disorientation, fatigue). Besides being a common food sensitivity, soy is one of the most genetically engineered foods. In many food products it is highly processed. I wonder if I would be able to assimilate it were I able to get soy products that are pre-engineered and minimally processed.
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    Sep 07, 2012 3:40 AM GMT
    yourname2000 said
    mindgarden saidProlly got some deadly dihydrogen oxide in there too.

    They've been using this chemical more and more in food production these days....even as far down the food chain as restaurants and local grocery stores.

    It's alarming to say the least. icon_eek.gif


    It comes out of the well at our farm. icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 07, 2012 3:54 AM GMT
    That "x" really makes it sound evil, eh?

    Fear-mongering "health" news writers love that shit...

    :\

    better yet...

    :\/\/\
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    Sep 07, 2012 4:57 AM GMT
    I'm glad I've been going fresh and also with a turn in the direction of organic.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Sep 07, 2012 6:14 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidProlly got some deadly dihydrogen oxide in there too.


    Yes, water is very toxic.
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    Sep 07, 2012 7:06 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    GAMRican saidI'm glad I've been going fresh and also with a turn in the direction of organic.


    Same here, I am not too concerned with organic but I think the best thing we can do for ourselves is to avoid as much processed food as possible. These food companies are unscrupulous and don't care about how their products affect the public in the long run. All they care about are their bank accounts.


    Im with you 2 on this
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Sep 07, 2012 7:26 AM GMT
    As much as we hide behind our organic labels, just be aware that there is absolutely zero government regulation regarding that term. Literally anyone with any product can use it.
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    Sep 07, 2012 7:35 AM GMT
    Wasn't that whole story a canard drummed up by meat industry lobbyists?