Training to failure?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 5:16 AM GMT
    What are your thoughts on training to failure? I used to go to failure on each set, but now I decided to go to failure on the last set of each exercise. I feel like this is more effective because my muscles are less fatigued which means that I don't have to keep reducing the weight after every set. I also heard of people who are completely against training to failure.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 3:33 PM GMT
    I train to failure on alternating weeks. Everyone's body responds differently but with my own, I've found that when I train to failure for one week and train moderately on the next, I maintain my size, strength, and endurance!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 3:44 PM GMT
    CuriousOne saidI train to failure on alternating weeks. Everyone's body responds differently but with my own, I've found that when I train to failure for one week and train moderately on the next, I maintain my size, strength, and endurance!


    excellent advise.. there is truth to "muscle memory" so you want to keep them guessing.. this will help you break through "platoes" and continue to gain muscle if that is your goal..
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 10:34 PM GMT
    CuriousOne saidI train to failure on alternating weeks. Everyone's body responds differently but with my own, I've found that when I train to failure for one week and train moderately on the next, I maintain my size, strength, and endurance!

    Do you go to failure on each set when you train to failure?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 11:28 PM GMT
    I follow Wendler when I do Legs, Chest, and Shoulders. On the last set you do 90% of your 1 rep max. So for back squat on the 90% I go to failure. I find it has helped push through my plateaus in all three areas.

    But I don't think you should push yourself to failure at the end of every set everytime. The every other week tip sounds good. I feel like pushing to failure everytime increases your chances of pulling a muscle. But that's just an opinion.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 11:33 PM GMT
    Training to failure at every set with a focus on ascending sets is the best and most efficient way to gain muscle. The point is to work better, not longer. You do, however need to give yourself plenty of rest time every third day or so.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 11:35 PM GMT
    bronbel123 saidI follow Wendler when I do Legs, Chest, and Shoulders. On the last set you do 90% of your 1 rep max. So for back squat on the 90% I go to failure. I find it has helped push through my plateaus in all three areas.

    But I don't think you should push yourself to failure at the end of every set everytime. The every other week tip sounds good. I feel like pushing to failure everytime increases your chances of pulling a muscle. But that's just an opinion.


    Pulling a muscle will happen if you train to failure paired with bad form and when muscles are tight. That is why stretching and foam rolling is crucial
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 11:49 PM GMT
    No it is not necessary, and the research supports the fact it is not necessary. Whatever the stimulus is, there is a response.

    In practice, it depends on if your goal is to get a swoll look (hypertrophy) or to increase strength. For increasing strength I personally don't recommend training to failure because you're more likely to get more stimulus in by doing multiple low rep sets at the high weight than by burning them out in the first set and having to reduce the weight, thereby reducing the amount of volume at that high rep.

    Also, I don't understand why you would do an ascending set unless you are trying to figure out how much weight you can lift safely or if your goal is purely to burn your muscle out. You know your strength better with descending sets after you know what to start with by doing an ascending set for a few weeks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 11:55 PM GMT
    Having mediocre workouts lead to mediocre bodies that are ineffective by not meeting or surpassing that lactate threshold. To see max gains you must surpass threshold every time while recovering the body with plenty of time.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 07, 2012 11:59 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidNo it is not necessary, and the research supports the fact it is not necessary. Whatever the stimulus is, there is a response.

    In practice, it depends on if your goal is to get a swoll look (hypertrophy) or to increase strength. For increasing strength I personally don't recommend training to failure because you're more likely to get more stimulus in by doing multiple low rep sets at the high weight than by burning them out in the first set and having to reduce the weight, thereby reducing the amount of volume at that high rep.

    Also, I don't understand why you would do an ascending set unless you are trying to figure out how much weight you can lift safely or if your goal is purely to burn your muscle out. You know your strength better with descending sets after you know what to start with by doing an ascending set for a few weeks.


    You do ascending reverse count sets to work the muscle not for your own knowledge.