Are there guys here who only eat "100% Organic" foods?

  • CMIYC

    Posts: 9

    Sep 09, 2012 7:01 PM GMT
    Wouldn't this really limit your food choices?

    The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets, defines, and regulates the use and meaning of "Organic" on food labels. It is the term used to describe raw or processed agricultural products and ingredients that have been (a) organically grown (farmed) and (b) handled in compliance with the standards of April 2001, which have been fully enforced since October 2002. These standards prohibit the use of:

    Most synthetic fertilizers and pesticides.
    Sewer sludge fertilizers.
    Genetic engineering.
    Growth hormones.
    Irradiation.
    Antibiotics.
    Artificial ingredients.
    Many synthetic additives.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Sep 10, 2012 1:40 AM GMT
    humm good question. if they do they must grow all of there own food and never eat out
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    Sep 10, 2012 2:23 AM GMT
    I try to eat as many organic foods as I could, but sometime it can be very expensive. Half or 3/4 of your groceries portion should be organic.
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    Sep 10, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    I read the other day that organic veggies and fruits are not any better for a person the cheaper versions. Maybe try organic meat. You would save a lot of money.
  • ja_natuerlich

    Posts: 2

    Sep 10, 2012 3:15 AM GMT
    me.
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    Sep 10, 2012 3:16 AM GMT
    mtguy333 saidI read the other day that organic veggies and fruits are not any better for a person the cheaper versions. Maybe try organic meat. You would save a lot of money.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2ET7Xv2m9k&feature=youtube_gdata_player
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Sep 10, 2012 3:27 AM GMT
    i eat about 80 percent organic
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    Nov 03, 2012 1:35 PM GMT
    It's pretty much impossible here in the U.S. Our government doesn't give a rat's ass about the health of it's citizens, and the FDA (colossal joke), turns a blind eye to known cancer causing additives in our food, not to mention GMO "food".
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    Nov 03, 2012 1:57 PM GMT
    One problem is when the USDA got involved in defining "organic" the requirements became much less strict and allowed some things to be done that had never before been allowed with "certified" organics.

    The newest "studies" show that there are no benefits to eating organic.

    With that said, we raise most of our own food. It's basically organic. We use no chemicals on it, all the beef is grass-fed, the poultry is free range.... etc.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 03, 2012 2:01 PM GMT
    I think "organic" foods are nice, but at the grocery store, I have the impression that means "specialty" to some stores.... meaning far higher prices. I realize that some of these foods require different processing, but I'm amazed at the differences sometimes.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 03, 2012 3:59 PM GMT
    My only problem with the organic craze is that I don't always see the expected results. For instance, one of my female friends will only eat organic--and in general is such a health nut that she ends up being a party pooper... and she looks like crap! She's my age, but whereas I get mistaken for ten years younger on a good day, she sometimes looks ten years older than her actual age. It reminds me of old sepia photos, where everyone in them looks so old and stern-faced, even the children. She'd fit right in, in one of those photos. I'd like to know if some of the fortifying processes actually benefit a youthful appearance. icon_question.gif
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:19 PM GMT
    I honestly don't know how much better it is for me, but I've switched to eating about 90% organic. The only time I don't is when I eat out, which I don't do very often. I've noticed some interesting things. I used to be lactose intolerant and I am not anymore. I used to get pretty bad facial acne and I don't anymore (though I attribute this in part to eating less dairy overall). My grocery spending is higher, but only about 5% on average. I don't feel limited at all because I didn't eat a lot of processed crap to begin with and I actually like to cook.