No Dairy - Enough Calcium?

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    Sep 10, 2012 1:13 AM GMT
    I'm lactose intolerant, and I'm wondering if I get enough calcium in my diet. Does anyone else who doesn't eat dairy, by choice or otherwise, have any opinions about this?

    I calculated the total calcium I get from the supplements I take, and it doesn't add up to my daily allowance. I haven't added up the amount I'd get from food from my typical daily diet, but I don't think it's much.
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    Sep 10, 2012 1:22 AM GMT
    10_LactoHi20267.jpg

    Lactase
    Amylase Thera-blend
    Protease Thera-blend
    Glucoamylase
    Lipase Thera-blend
    Maltase
    Cellulase Thera-blend
    Alpha-Galactosidase
    Invertase


    Food Sources

    "Excellent sources of calcium include spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens and tofu.

    Very good sources of calcium include blackstrap molasses, Swiss chard, yogurt, kale, mozzarella cheese, cow's milk, and goat's milk. Basil, thyme, dill seed, oregano, and cinnamon are also very good sources of calcium.

    Good sources of calcium include romaine lettuce, celery, broccoli, sesame seeds, fennel, cabbage, summer squash, green beans, garlic, Brussel sprouts, oranges, asparagus, leeks and crimini mushrooms. Rosemary, cumin seeds, cloves, coriander seeds, scallops, and kelp (a sea vegetable) are also good sources of calcium. "
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    Sep 10, 2012 4:15 AM GMT
    ^^^Sweety, you have milks and cheese listed. Don't those have lactose?

    @ OP.DiN: Make sure to eat actual food with your supplements. Vitamins will get pissed out of your system if you don't have natural fiber from fruits and vegetables, like those listed, to help them get processed properly. Food for thought* icon_wink.gif
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    Sep 10, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    Green veggies!!!
    Or, dare I say, RAW milk!
    Calcium carbonate is crap...and when taken by itself (isolated), it can build up in the arteries, leading to calcification...and in the long run raise your risk for heart disease. If you're super low, high quality [food-based] supplementation is just fine. But focus on diet changes to increase your Ca uptake, rather than cheap pills.
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    Sep 10, 2012 4:44 AM GMT
    JR_RJ said^^^Sweety, you have milks and cheese listed. Don't those have lactose?

    @ OP.DiN: Make sure to eat actual food with your supplements. Vitamins will get pissed out of your system if you don't have natural fiber from fruits and vegetables, like those listed, to help them get processed properly. Food for thought* icon_wink.gif


    Usually solid dairy products don't have quite as much lactose as liquid dairy products. But that really depends on the product itself and how bad a person's intolerance is.

    A lot of different food products seem to have calcium additives these days. I mean, you could have a glass of orange juice that'll give you as much calcium and Vitamin D as a glass of milk would.
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    Sep 10, 2012 4:47 AM GMT
    nicodegallo said
    JR_RJ said^^^Sweety, you have milks and cheese listed. Don't those have lactose?

    @ OP.DiN: Make sure to eat actual food with your supplements. Vitamins will get pissed out of your system if you don't have natural fiber from fruits and vegetables, like those listed, to help them get processed properly. Food for thought* icon_wink.gif


    Usually solid dairy products don't have quite as much lactose as liquid dairy products. But that really depends on the product itself and how bad a person's intolerance is.

    A lot of different food products seem to have calcium additives these days. I mean, you could have a glass of orange juice that'll give you as much calcium and Vitamin D as a glass of milk would.

    Well, just a concern... not going to burrow a hole in my stomach, but knowing is half the battle! icon_surprised.gif
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    Sep 10, 2012 4:48 AM GMT
    I think it's one of those things that a person has to find out through trial and error. Some are more/less sensitive than others. Sometimes the intolerance is triggered not only by lactose itself, but it can also be because of the amount consumed, the time of day, certain food combinations, etc. It takes quite a while to figure all that out.

    Hell, they're pumping calcium into regular sandwich bread now.
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Sep 10, 2012 6:02 AM GMT
    I'd recommend fish as a source of calcium. They have good sources of Omega 3's as well. Little fish like sardines are great, since you're eating the bones.
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    Sep 10, 2012 6:51 AM GMT
    JR_RJ said^^^Sweety, you have milks and cheese listed. Don't those have lactose?

    @ OP.DiN: Make sure to eat actual food with your supplements. Vitamins will get pissed out of your system if you don't have natural fiber from fruits and vegetables, like those listed, to help them get processed properly. Food for thought* icon_wink.gif

    ^^^^Sweetums, it's a quotation. I know we're talking about DIN, but I expect even him to know enough to filter them out if he needs to.
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Sep 10, 2012 7:55 AM GMT

    Non-Dairy Sources of Calcium

    http://www.ellenskitchen.com/faqs/calcium.html



    http://www.healthhabits.ca/2011/11/04/top-13-non-dairy-calcium-rich-foods/

    The Top 13 NON-DAIRY Calcium Rich Foods
    Collards- 1 cup boiled and drained – 357 mg calcium
    Rhubarb – 1 cup cooked with sugar – 348 mg calcium
    Sardines – 3 oz / 85 grams – 325 mg calcium
    Spinach – 1 cup boiled and drained – 291 mg calcium
    Turnip Greens – 1 cup boiled and drained – 249 mg calcium
    Blackeye peas – 1 cup cooked – 211 mg calcium
    Kale – 1 cup boiled and drained – 179 mg calcium
    Soybeans, 1 cup boiled – 175 mg calcium
    Cabbage, chinese (pak-choi) – 1 cup boiled and drained – 158 mg calcium
    Beans, baked, canned, with pork and tomato sauce – 1 cup – 142 mg calcium
    Okra – 1 cup boiled and drained – 136 mg calcium
    Shrimp – 3 oz / 85 grams canned – 123 mg calcium
    Crab – 1 cup canned – 123 mg calcium
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:15 AM GMT
    Thanks guys! I haven't had a chance to sift through all of this info yet. I do eat some of the foods listed, but not regularly enough and in large enough quantities to meet my 1000mg daily allowance.
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:17 AM GMT
    Out of curiosity, do you know what dairy products you can handle at least in moderation?
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:18 AM GMT
    nicodegallo saidOut of curiosity, do you know what dairy products you can handle at least in moderation?


    Kefir is the only thing I handle as far as I know. I can handle very tiny amounts of cheese, like bread with a little cheese baked on top for flavor. That's it.
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:19 AM GMT
    Wow, I guess your intolerance is quite high!
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:20 AM GMT
    nicodegallo saidWow, I guess your intolerance is quite high!


    Extremely. I've tried probiotics, but none of them have helped. It's hell not being able to eat anything dairy.
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:22 AM GMT
    Well, if it makes you feel any better, most humans in the world are lactose intolerant. In fact, our species was most likely originally lactose intolerant. Besides, when you think about it, it's quite strange that we have this attachment to milk beyond infancy unlike all other mammals!
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:26 AM GMT
    nicodegallo saidWell, if it makes you feel any better, most humans in the world are lactose intolerant. In fact, our species was most likely originally lactose intolerant. Besides, when you think about it, it's quite strange that we have this attachment to milk beyond infancy unlike all other mammals!


    Yeah, but on the other hand, it's kind of strange that we're born being able to digest milk but then lose that ability as we grow older. I used eat/drink dairy at every meal. I think I started becoming somewhat lactose intolerant as an adult, but then I went on medication that utterly destroyed my ability to handle dairy.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Sep 11, 2012 4:45 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    nicodegallo saidWell, if it makes you feel any better, most humans in the world are lactose intolerant. In fact, our species was most likely originally lactose intolerant. Besides, when you think about it, it's quite strange that we have this attachment to milk beyond infancy unlike all other mammals!


    Yeah, but on the other hand, it's kind of strange that we're born being able to digest milk but then lose that ability as we grow older. I used eat/drink dairy at every meal. I think I started becoming somewhat lactose intolerant as an adult, but then I went on medication that utterly destroyed my ability to handle dairy.


    When we were kids, we used to eat canned salmon and talk about the little bones giving us calcium.. Also, are not dark leafy greens, like kale, good for calcium? I am really fond of sardines, especially when I want to eat at my desk and want to be left alone for a change.

    The doc should test you and let you know the result and whether you need supplements. That's what mine does for iron and sometimes I have to take iron supplements for several months at a time.

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    Sep 11, 2012 4:55 AM GMT
    Yes, dark, leafy greens have some calcium, but I can only eat so much of those. I've never had sardines, but I have a feeling I'd hate the crunch of the bones. That sounds so gross. I can't remember if I've had my calcium levels tested or not. I'm not sure if that's something that would normally be done for a male my age. My doctor does know that I can't eat dairy though.
  • LJay

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    Sep 11, 2012 5:04 AM GMT
    You don't preceive the bones in sardines. They are cooked to super soft in the can. Oddly enough, sardines are often best in pretty simple form: plop a couple on a soda cracker and smear with mustard. They are a bit of an acquired taste, but an incredibly good portable food. They come packed in oil or just water. Take your pick.
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    Sep 11, 2012 5:42 AM GMT
    But sardines still sound so gross. icon_sad.gif
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    Sep 11, 2012 5:43 AM GMT
    I wouldn't rely on green veggies for calcium because they have phytate, an antinutrient that binds divalent metal cations, including calcium, zinc, magnesium, manganese, etc.

    Consider soymilk. It has more calcium than milk when fortified.
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    Sep 11, 2012 5:58 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidConsider soymilk. It has more calcium than milk when fortified.


    If it's fortified with calcium carbonate, wouldn't that be the same as taking a supplement? I don't need the protein or anything else from soy milk. I do drink it occasionally when I want some milk-like.
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    Sep 11, 2012 5:59 AM GMT
    Even though it has calcium in it, dairy is acid forming in the body. The body tried to buffer that acidity by leeching minerals, namely calcium from the body to balance the pH. It ends up doing the opposite of what we have been conditioned to believe. You can get the calcium you need through dark green vegetables, sesame seeds, beans, etc, like that are listed above. icon_smile.gif
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Sep 11, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidBut sardines still sound so gross. icon_sad.gif


    Well just close your eyes and chew 'em up. They are a poor man's good friend.

    If you really are a squeamish wimp [for which I cannot blame you] try some skinless and boneless sardines to get used to the taste and idea of them. They are the most expensive kind, but really good.

    Another good way to eat sardines is to dump the whole can on a piece of wheat toast. Yah, Oley, dem's good!!!