Raw eggs and Protein Shakes

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    Sep 11, 2012 3:16 PM GMT
    I was wondering how many people have tried adding raw eggs to their proteins shakes and if they have noticed any side affects (i.e. Salmonella, etc).

    Been debating on whether I wanted to starting adding them on the intent of trying to gain more weight. Any input/testimonials would be helpful.
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    Sep 11, 2012 4:04 PM GMT
    Pasteurized liquid egg whites have no danger of salmonella (they're pasteurized!). I get a good deal on the Kirkland brand at Costco. Some people complain about the taste of that brand but it seems fine to me, and it makes my blended protein shakes and ice cream nice and frothy.
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    Sep 11, 2012 7:02 PM GMT
    Eagermuscle is correct. Ive done raw eggwhites for awhile. No side effects if you look for organic and pastuerization.

    Really alot more convenient if you're on the go all of the time. I usually have a bowl of oatmeal or organic cerial to follow up with my eggwhites at breakfast.
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    Sep 19, 2012 4:43 AM GMT
    I do 1 cup of this every morning.images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQTzdkwL2z2oCj3D-43djs

    No Cholesterol, fat, excess calories, salmonella...Extremely convenient, fast and effective. One cup has roughly 48g of pure protein. Chug it, wash it down with juice or water and be on your way.

    As far as gaining weight, if you want to do it clean and healthy, meaning lean muscle mass, then this is a good supplement to a well rounded diet plan.
    To 'gain weight' you need to have a caloric excess above maintenance. That is, if you consume roughly 2000 calories a day and have stayed the same weight, you will need more than that to gain. The excess calories should come from a combination of quality carbs, protein and fats. Combine this diet with a solid weightlifting program, you should gain solid, lean mass (weight).

    Don't get discouraged when you don't gain as fast as you would like. Under best case scenarios and natural circumstances, a man can gain roughly 20lbs of solid, lean muscle mass per year.
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    Sep 19, 2012 4:53 AM GMT
    do people really put raw eggs in protein shakes? I feel like I get more than enough protein in my diet but I'm wondering now if I should add it in the shake
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    Sep 19, 2012 5:01 AM GMT
    I've never understood the concept of eating shit that's disgusting just to transform the body's shape.

    I only eat awesome tasty stuff. If improvements can be made with less tasty stuff, they'll just have to wait.

    BTW, if you want to add eggs to your protein shake, try adding more eggs and less powder. That'll do you more good than ingesting more factory processed chemicals.
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    Sep 19, 2012 5:03 AM GMT
    Eating/drinking raw eggs regularly is a bad idea. Raw eggs contain a protein called avidin that leads to biotin deficiency within a few months of regularly eating raw eggs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biotin_deficiency

    Biotin is required for many common processes in your body, including generating ATP, the near universal energy storage molecule.
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    Sep 19, 2012 5:04 AM GMT
    The protein in raw eggs is not as bioavailable as the protein in cooked eggs. Don't waste the effort. Cooked eggs are a great source of protein, so I replaced my carb-heavy breakfast with eggs.
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    Sep 19, 2012 5:31 AM GMT
    If you want to gain muscle your caloric input has to be greater than your caloric output and it needs to be clean. There are many viable calorie/protein/fat boosters that would be a better option than raw eggs. Steel cut oats, flax seeds, chia seeds, and greek yogurt to name a few.
  • GWriter

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    Sep 19, 2012 11:18 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidEating raw eggs over a long extended period can result in a Biotin deficiency.

    Only consume pasteurized egg whites if you want raw eggs.

    Raw eggs contain very high levels of avidin which bind to the biotin in the intestinal track.

    Plus the risks of salmonella can prove to be unfavorable and dangerous.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biotin_deficiency


    As the article points out, the avidin is in the whites, so eating just raw egg whites is about the worst option you could choose. There's a reason every traditional recipe that uses raw eggs (e.g. Caesar salad, steak tartare) calls for the yolks only.
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    Sep 19, 2012 11:33 AM GMT
    is it really that hard to just either scramble them up in the morning which takes two minutes or just boil them the night before
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    Sep 19, 2012 11:53 AM GMT
    Eggs only need to be cooked thanks to foul farming and production processes in the US. Here in Taiwan, and in many countries where agribusiness isn't the name of the game, salmonella isn't a threat.

    As others mentioned, if you want raw egg, buy pasteurized. But why not just cook them? They taste better that way, anyway.
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    Sep 19, 2012 1:48 PM GMT
    mm98 saidEating/drinking raw eggs regularly is a bad idea. Raw eggs contain a protein called avidin that leads to biotin deficiency within a few months of regularly eating raw eggs.

    I guess absolutely nothing is good in excess. I'm wondering if cycling on and off the raw eggs, say one week on and two weeks off, would make the biotin deficiency risk negligible.
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    Sep 19, 2012 1:49 PM GMT
    Runninchlt saidThere are many viable calorie/protein/fat boosters that would be a better option than raw eggs. Steel cut oats, flax seeds, chia seeds, and greek yogurt to name a few.

    Funny, I add all those things to my oatmeal too, 'cept the Greek yogurt which goes into the protein shake.
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    Sep 19, 2012 1:51 PM GMT
    redacting saidBut why not just cook them? They taste better that way, anyway.

    Plus I have a half dozen hard boiled egg whites per day as a midafternoon snack. (I precook 3 dozen at a time and portion them out in containers, as I do my oatmeal and most meals.)
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    Sep 19, 2012 2:04 PM GMT
    If you want to supplement with Raw egg white - you should supplement your biotin intake - sources of biotin include salmon, sardines, pork, avocado, cauliflower, mushrooms, raspberries, bananas, cheddar cheese, nuts such as peanuts, walnuts, almonds and pecans, soybeans and other legumes and whole-wheat bread.
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    Sep 19, 2012 2:38 PM GMT
    sc69 saidIf you want to supplement with Raw egg white - you should supplement your biotin intake - sources of biotin include salmon...avocado, cauliflower...raspberries, bananas...almonds...and other legumes.

    I eat all of these regularly, most daily. So you're saying that if you eat these foods regularly you don't have to worry about biotin deficiencies from long term injestion of raw egg whites? (Too lazy to do own research this morning.)
  • DeadLiftr

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    Sep 21, 2012 10:49 PM GMT

    I guess I'm in the minority, but I eat two raw eggs every morning (blended with greek yogurt, berries, carrot juice and kale). I haven't had any problems with them, and enjoy the added protein.

    The risk of salmonella is negligible (estimated to be 1 in 30,000 eggs according to wikipedia). Although the protein is less bio-available, it's still good for when you're on the go and don't have time to cook and eat the eggs.
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    Sep 21, 2012 11:05 PM GMT
    DeadLiftr said
    I guess I'm in the minority, but I eat two raw eggs every morning (blended with greek yogurt, berries, carrot juice and kale). I haven't had any problems with them, and enjoy the added protein.

    The risk of salmonella is negligible (estimated to be 1 in 30,000 eggs according to wikipedia). Although the protein is less bio-available, it's still good for when you're on the go and don't have time to cook and eat the eggs.


    yeah.... I was going to say, I know lots of people who eat raw eggs and have for quite a while with no noticeable effects (I've done it off and on). normally I like to play it on the safe side but I feel like this is a little overstated as a threat
  • amidon7

    Posts: 139

    Sep 21, 2012 11:36 PM GMT
    Aren't raw eggs difficult to digest? I prefer mine soft boiled. I have 2 every day.
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    Sep 22, 2012 12:15 AM GMT
    As has already been stated about worry about salmonella and avidin giving you a biotin deficiency, these things need to be stated because some people think eggs are a magical protein and nothing comes close and these same people may eat them everyday as a major protein source.

    Protein is protein is protein. All protein is composed of amino acids. Some amino acids are able to be extracted through digestion easier than others, but not in any significant sense (look at the PDCAAS). I don't eat eggs or meat and do fine. There are healthier sources of protein that don't involve throwing away 4 out of 7 of the grams of protein an egg has to avoid the cholesterol in an egg.

    Why many think the only places protein exists is eggs and meat is lack of knowledge and a comfort factor.