How good is your English grammar?

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Sep 15, 2012 11:55 AM GMT
    It seems that grammar isn't taught in high school any more which is a shame. I'm curious; how is your English grammar?
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    Sep 15, 2012 12:06 PM GMT
    I think my Grammar is superb-- at least with respect to everyone else. It can be, of course, improved. icon_smile.gif
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    Sep 15, 2012 12:32 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI know how to distinguish the difference between the use of "who" versus "whom."

    Most people who think they're being smart with the inaccurate use of "whom" make me chuckle. News anchorpeople are guilty of this every now and then. It's a shame that people who are in a position to reach large audiences can negatively and wrongly influence so many to speak poorly.

    Then there is the debate whether the use of the subjunctive is appropriate or if the past tense should be used. I'm in favor of the use of the subjunctive in all cases when speaking in hypothetical terms. For example:

    If I were your boyfriend, I'd buy you flowers. Were is the subjunctive and this is how I prefer to speak.

    But nowadays people almost always say, "If I was your boyfriend." I don't like the sound of that.

    People are making up all these odd sounding rules and make claims and assert that some imaginary timeline has been accepted (by whom?) to distinguish the use of was and were in the sentence above. But there is no official authority in the English language that can either deny or support this. So throughout time people's English and their grasp of it changes over time. That's one thing I don't like about the English language.


    Hmn.. Interesting. icon_smile.gif I'm not as... schooled on the particular cases required in the mechanics of sentence structure and syntax; however, I do know how to make it work in a sentence. I've personally wobbled with the idea of were versus was when used in such a sentence structure.

    I guess given that most people aren't so particular, I just have eased my way into the majority preference of subjunctives-- was-- to indicate singular/past participle (I think it is). Perhaps that is where the confusion begins.

    But seriously, Grammar needs not to be removed from our education. People suck at it as it is. >:/ We need MORE lessons. MOOOOOOAR. >:O
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    Sep 15, 2012 12:40 PM GMT
    Used to be stellar, but dwindled with the poetic approach... it's the grammatical equivalent to a doctor's signature. icon_confused.gif
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    Sep 15, 2012 12:41 PM GMT
    JR_RJ saidUsed to be stellar, but dwindled with the poetic approach... it's the grammatical equivalent to a doctor's signature. icon_confused.gif


    At least it's pretty? icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 15, 2012 2:13 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI know how to distinguish the difference between the use of "who" versus "whom."




    I seldom get that one right. Perhaps you would be willing to explain it?
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    Sep 15, 2012 2:26 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    Blakes7 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI know how to distinguish the difference between the use of "who" versus "whom."




    I seldom get that one right. Perhaps you would be willing to explain it?

    Who is used as a subject, e.g. "Who is speaking?"
    Whom is used as either direct or indirect object, "Of whom are you speaking?" Note that in this case whom is the object of the verb "speaking".

    Wow, it's that simple. icon_question.gif Who da thunk it?

    Thanks
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    Sep 15, 2012 6:33 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    Blakes7 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI know how to distinguish the difference between the use of "who" versus "whom."




    I seldom get that one right. Perhaps you would be willing to explain it?

    Who is used as a subject, e.g. "Who is speaking?"
    Whom is used as either direct or indirect object, "Of whom are you speaking?" Note that in this case whom is the object of the verb "speaking".


    Is whom the object of the verb "speaking" or the object of the preposition "of" with the prepositional phrase "of whom" being the object of the verb "speaking"? Or did I just do a technical hair split.

    This might be funny:

    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_(grammar)[/url]
    "An object in grammar is part of a sentence, and often part of the predicate. It denotes somebody or something involved in the subject's "performance" of the verb. Basically, it is what or whom the verb is acting upon. As an example, the following sentence is given:

    In the sentence "Bobby scored a goal", "a goal" is the object."


    Shouldn't that have been "...it is what or who the verb is acting upon"? but whom would have been correct had the sentence been structured: "The verb is acting upon whom?"

    When do we ever say "it is whom you know that counts"?
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    Sep 15, 2012 6:38 PM GMT
    I think my grammar is gooder than average.
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    Sep 15, 2012 6:41 PM GMT
    xrichx saidI think my grammar is gooder than average.
    Me also think same
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    Sep 15, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    I agree, proper grammar isn't really emphasized in school these days. But I'm not worried. We have plenty of spelling/grammar nazis on the internet that will be sure to let you know when you fuck up. icon_lol.gif
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    Sep 15, 2012 6:48 PM GMT
    English grammar is still taught in elementary and middle schools.