..... we, sworn members of TEAL, will be taking a road trip around the country to stamp out as many typos as we can find, in public signage and other venues where innocent eyes may be befouled by vile stains on the delicate fabric of our language. We do not blame, nor chastise, the authors of these typos. It is natural for mistakes to occur; everybody will slip now and again. But slowly the once-unassailable foundations of spelling are crumbling, and the time has come for the crisis to be addres

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    Aug 23, 2008 3:43 AM GMT
    wait till they get to RJ...they are gonna have a ball ! ! ! ! ! 1


    http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/08/22/sign.vandals.ap/index.html
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    Aug 23, 2008 3:45 AM GMT
    Do I get a prize for the longest title?
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    Aug 23, 2008 3:46 AM GMT
    *SMACK*
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    Aug 23, 2008 3:49 AM GMT
    The most pervasive and annoying typo in graffiti here is made by stupid gangsta-wannabes who spray paint their territories with Bloods and conversely...


    Crips

    WTF?

    It's supposed to be Crypts, dumbasseses. Scary thing is the typo still doesn't stop them from killing each other. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 23, 2008 3:51 AM GMT
    blink777 said*SMACK*

    Oh, if that's it....I must post an even longer title

    But let's cut to the chase....just how long does it have to be for you to chain me to your bed, put your underwear over my face and fuck me silly?
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:38 AM GMT

    Address is spelled with two s's, you princess.
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:46 AM GMT
    Shouldn't the title end with "addressed." The period is significant.
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:47 AM GMT
    I think he may have ran out of room. You are probably only allowed a certain amount of characters.
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:47 AM GMT
    GuiltyGear said
    Address is spelled with two s's, you princess.

    GiGi, there evidently is a limit to the length of a title...DA (and I dont mean District Attorney)...and the rest of the title got cut off ....just like yours which is why you are so obviously overcompensating
  • Tyinstl

    Posts: 353

    Aug 23, 2008 4:51 AM GMT
    GuiltyGear said
    Addres is spelled with one s, you princes.


    Fixed
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:52 AM GMT
    Tyinstl said
    GuiltyGear said
    Addres is spelled with one s, you princes.


    Fixed

    And the winner is Tynsel ! ! ! ! ! (Loud Round of Applause, please)
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:54 AM GMT
    [Golf Clap]
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:57 AM GMT

    (jazz claps)

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    Aug 23, 2008 5:00 AM GMT
    cat
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    Aug 23, 2008 5:03 AM GMT
    kitty ...Oh, I love these two.... I never missed them when they would play the Borscht Belt.
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    Aug 23, 2008 5:18 AM GMT
    Here's some extra humor to add to this thread.



    http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.com/2008/05/12/99-grammar/

    #99 Grammar
    May 12, 2008 by clander

    White people love rules. It explains why so they get upset when people cut in line, why they tip so religiously and why they become lawyers. But without a doubt, the rule system that white people love the most is grammar. It is in their blood not only to use perfect grammar but also to spend significant portions of time pointing out the errors of others.

    When asking someone about their biggest annoyances in life, you might expect responses like “hunger,” “being poor,” or “getting shot.” If you ask a white person, the most common response will likely be “people who use ‘their’ when they mean ‘there.’ Maybe comma splices, I’m not sure but it’s definitely one of the two.”

    If you wish to gain the respect of a white person, it’s probably a good idea that you find an obscure and debated grammar rule such as the “Oxford Comma” and take a firm stance on what you believe is correct. This is seen as more productive and forward thinking than simply stating your anger at the improper use of “it’s.

    Another important thing to know is that when white people read magazines and books they are always looking for grammar and spelling mistakes. In fact, one of the greatest joys a white person can experience is to catch a grammar mistake in a major publication. Finding one allows a white person to believe that they are better than the writer and the publication since they would have caught the mistake. The more respected the publication, the greater the thrill. If a white person were to catch a mistake in The New Yorker, it would be a sufficient reason for a large party.

    Though they reserve the harshest judgment for professional, do not assume that white people will cast a blind eye to your grammar mistakes in email and official documents. They will judge you and make a general assessment about your intelligence after the first infraction. Fortunately, this situation can be improved if you ask a white person to proof read your work before you send it out. “Hey Jill, I’m sorry to do this, but I have a business degree and I’m a terrible writer. Can you look this over for me?” This deft maneuver will allow the white person to feel as though their liberal arts degree has a purpose and allow you to do something more interesting.

    Don’t worry, it is impossible for a white person to turn down the opportunity to proofread.

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    Aug 23, 2008 5:27 AM GMT
    lilmaninsc said You are probably only allowed a certain amount of characters.


    Suur az fook culda fuled mi!

    On an unrelated note..

    TEH INTARWBEZ IS SERIZ BIZNES! Like space ships and emotionally unstable leprechauns.
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    Aug 23, 2008 6:24 AM GMT
    Oxford Comma

    The Oxford comma (also known as the serial comma or Harvard comma) is the comma used immediately before a grammatical conjunction (nearly always and or or; sometimes nor) that precedes the last item in a list of three or more items. The phrase "Portugal, Spain, and France", for example, is written with the Oxford comma, while "Portugal, Spain and France", identical in meaning, is written without it.[1][2][3]
    There is no global consensus among writers or editors on the use of the Oxford comma.[4] Most authorities on American English recommend its use,[5] but it is not so frequently used in British English (see extended treatment below, including a survey of published recommendations in Usage and subsequent sections). In many languages (e.g. French,[6] Italian,[7] Polish,[8] Spanish[9]) the Oxford comma is not normally used, although it may be employed in cases where it aids clarity or the prosody to be used when reading.
    Arguments for and against
    Arguments typically advanced for use of the Oxford comma by default include:
    4. that it better matches the spoken cadence of sentences;[10]
    5. that it sometimes reduces ambiguity;[11]
    6. that its use matches practice with other means of separating items in a list (example: when semicolons are used to separate items, a semicolon is consistently included before the last item, even when and or or is present);[12]
    Arguments typically advanced for avoidance of the Oxford comma by default include:
    4. that it is against conventional practice;[13]
    5. that it may introduce ambiguity (see examples below); and
    6. that it is redundant, since the and or the or serves by itself to mark the logical separation between the final two items.[14]
    Many sources, however, are against both automatic use and automatic avoidance of the Oxford comma, and make recommendations in a more nuanced way (see Usage and subsequent sections).
    Ambiguity
    Resolving ambiguity
    Use of the Oxford comma can sometimes remove ambiguity. Consider the possibly apocryphal book dedication quoted by Teresa Nielsen Hayden[15]:
    To my parents, Ayn Rand and God.
    There is ambiguity about the writer's parentage, because Ayn Rand and God can be read as in apposition to my parents, leading the reader to believe that the writer refers to Ayn Rand and God as his or her parents. A comma before and removes the ambiguity:
    To my parents, Ayn Rand, and God.
    Consider also:
    My favourite types of sandwiches are pastrami, ham, cream cheese and peanut butter and jelly.
    According to the two most plausible interpretations of this sentence, four kinds of sandwich are listed. But it is uncertain which are the third and fourth kinds. Adding a Oxford comma removes this ambiguity. With a comma after peanut butter, the kinds of sandwich are these:
    5. pastrami
    6. ham
    7. cream cheese and peanut butter
    8. jelly
    With a comma after cream cheese, the kinds of sandwich are these:
    5. pastrami
    6. ham
    7. cream cheese
    8. peanut butter and jelly
    Some writers who normally avoid the Oxford comma may use one in these circumstances, though sometimes re-ordering the elements of such a list can help as well.
    Creating ambiguity
    Use of the Oxford comma can introduce ambiguity. An example would be a book dedication reading:
    To my mother, Ayn Rand and God.
    In the context of the no-serial-comma convention this is unambiguously a list of three, but introducing a Oxford comma creates ambiguity about the writer's mother, because "Ayn Rand" can then be read as in apposition to "my mother" (with the commas fulfilling a parenthetical function):
    To my mother, Ayn Rand, and God.
    This ambiguity could be resolved by restating the preposition before each list item:
    To my mother, to Ayn Rand, and to God.
    Consider also:
    Betty, a maid and a rabbit.
    When the Oxford comma is not used, this is clearly a list of two people and a rabbit (assuming that the unlikely idea that Betty is both a maid and a rabbit is rejected), whereas
    Betty, a maid, and a rabbit
    may refer either to one person (Betty, who is a maid) or to two people (Betty and a maid) and a rabbit.
    Unresolved ambiguity
    The Times once published this description of a Peter Ustinov documentary: "highlights of his global tour include encounters with Nelson Mandela, an 800-year-old demigod and a dildo collector."[16] This is ambiguous as it stands, but even if a Oxford comma were added Mandela could still be mistaken for a demigod.
    Or consider "They went to Oregon with Betty, a maid, and a cook." The presence of the last comma in the list creates the possibility that Betty is a maid, reasonably allowing it to be read either as a list of two people or as a list of three people, context aside. On the other hand, removing the comma leaves the possibility that Betty is both a maid and a cook; so in this case neither the use nor the avoidance of the Oxford comma resolves the ambiguity.
    A writer who intends that Betty, the maid, and the cook be taken as three distinct people may create an ambiguous sentence, regardless of whether the Oxford comma is adopted. Furthermore, if the reader is unaware of which convention is being used, both versions are always ambiguous.
    These forms (among others) would remove the ambiguity:
    • They went to Oregon with Betty – a maid and a cook. (One person)
    • They went to Oregon with Betty, who is a maid and a cook. (One person)
    • They went to Oregon with Betty (a maid) and a cook. (Two people)
    • They went to Oregon with Betty – a maid – and a cook. (Two people)
    • They went to Oregon with the maid Betty and a cook. (Two people)
    • They went to Oregon with Betty and a maid and a cook. (Three people)
    • They went to Oregon with Betty, one maid and a cook. (Three people)
    • They went to Oregon with a full staff: Betty; a maid; and a cook. (Three people)
    • They went to Oregon with a maid, a cook, and Betty. (Three people)
    • They went to Oregon with a maid, a cook and Betty. (Three people)
    In general:
    • The list x, y and z is unambiguous if y and z cannot be read as in apposition to x.
    • Equally, x, y, and z is unambiguous if y cannot be read as in apposition to x.
    • If neither y nor y[,] and z can be read as in apposition to x, then both forms of the list are unambiguous; but if y or y[,] and z can be read as in apposition to x, then both forms of the list are ambiguous.
    • x and y and z is unambiguous.
    Usage
    The Chicago Manual of Style, Strunk and White's Elements of Style, most authorities on American English and Canadian English, and some authorities on British English (for example, Oxford University Press, and Fowler's Modern English Usage) recommend the use of the Oxford comma. Newspaper style guides (such as those published by The New York Times, the Associated Press, The Times newspaper in the United Kingdom, and the Canadian Press) recommend against it, possibly for economy of space.
    The differences of opinion on the use of the Oxford comma are well characterized by Lynne Truss in her popularized style guide Eats, Shoots & Leaves: "There are people who embrace the Oxford comma, and people who don't, and I'll just say this, never get between these people when drink has been taken."[17]
    In Australia, Canada, South Africa and the United Kingdom, the Oxford comma tends not to be used in non-academic publications unless its absence produces ambiguity. Many academic publishers (for example, Cambridge University Press) also avoid it, though some academic publishing houses in these countries do use it. The Australian Government Publishing Service's Style Manual for Authors, Editors and Printers (6th edition, 2002) recommends against it, except "to ensure clarity" (p. 102).
    Style guides supporting mandatory use
    The following style guides support mandatory use of the Oxford comma:
    The United States Government Printing Office's Style Manual
    After each member within a series of three or more words,
    ...
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    Aug 23, 2008 7:14 AM GMT
    I'm a fan of the Oxford comma. I use it in my posts on forums, chat, and email.
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    Aug 23, 2008 7:23 AM GMT
    *fullbodyfacepalm*
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    Aug 23, 2008 7:33 AM GMT
    I use the Oxford comma, other punctuation, and lubricant for a satisfying RJ experience.
  • kinetic

    Posts: 1125

    Aug 23, 2008 9:02 AM GMT
    I heard about this earlier today -Poor guys!
    Coming from someone who studied type in school (IMHO), they were doing the world a favor. AND they were doing it for free...
    -When geekdom goes horribly wrong!

    icon_mad.gif

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    Aug 23, 2008 9:23 AM GMT
    kinetic saidI heard about this earlier today -Poor guys!
    Coming from someone who studied type in school (IMHO), they were doing the world a favor. AND they were doing it for free...
    -When geekdom goes horribly wrong!

    icon_mad.gif


    Isnt the "(IMHO)" on the wrong side of the comma.

    As it stands, it is your humble opinion that it is coming from someone who studied type in school.
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    Aug 23, 2008 9:47 AM GMT
    fail owned pwned pictures
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    Aug 23, 2008 4:49 PM GMT
    Buckwheet said
    lilmaninsc said You are probably only allowed a certain amount of characters.


    Suur az fook culda fuled mi!

    On an unrelated note..

    TEH INTARWBEZ IS SERIZ BIZNES! Like space ships and emotionally unstable leprechauns.


    Its speld SERIUZ, nub!