Do you train yourself for peak performance in any area of your life?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 24, 2008 3:12 AM GMT
    Guys I know for many its about aesthetics, but I am curious about others that consistently train themselves not only to look good but for peak performance.

    Do you have specific goals for strength, power, speed, size, endurance, etc? Do you consistently pursue excellence in your physical program? Do you exercise or do you train? Are you an exerciser or an athlete? Do you pursue other areas of your life like this? Is there anyone else out there that is seeking to perform at peak levels on a consistent basis? If so are you measuring specific objective criteria and evaluating and enhancing your program? Do you use software, heart rate monitors, other peformance tracking/improvement methods or equipment.

    If you are about being the best in any area of your life, please sound off and tell us what is up? I will be posting my answer in the next day or two.
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    Aug 24, 2008 3:36 AM GMT
    Haha - your question made me laugh because of something the guy who teaches the spin class at my gym says. I take spin classes in the winter when getting out on the road is hazardous to ones health and this guy is just one of those frothing at the mouth bulldogs. Anyway, he says every class, "If you want to work out, go out there (points to rest of gym). In here, we train!"

    So yeah, I train. I like the aesthetic benefits of course but everything I do is to prepare for races (duathlons). I'm just an age grouper but I'm always working hard to do better than my last race. I keep a log of all my workouts and usually plan at least a week in advance with no upcoming race and weeks in advance with an upcoming race.

    I also mercilessly pester the guy who is informally coaching me! He's great about nudging me in the right direction. So yeah, I guess I take what I'm doing pretty seriously although I know the chances of me ever winning a race are slim to none. I can always beat the me who last raced though.
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    Aug 24, 2008 5:09 AM GMT
    Well... no. LOL. It's just not in my personality. I've never been the Type-A Go-Getter kind of guy. But yes, in things I have passion for, I really aim to do my best and work hard to give it my best, just not everything.

    My goals and my passion don't always coincide which is why, sadly, my workout goals is harder for me to reach. I get so easily distracted by things I find more interesting.

    So yes, my fitness goals is basically for aesthetics and feeling good rather than competing with myself. I'm honest enough to admit that.

    Lately, I have been slacking a lot since I don't find my current weights enough anymore. They don't even make me sweat as much as I used to. Time to move on. In the absence of a gym, I'm going to make a makeshift cable machine using iron bars, some rope, and weights at the end. I want to get some 'pull' exercises in, since all I've been doing until now is 'push' exercises. Wish me luck and hope I don't break everything in my room doing so. LOL

    At least I find the concept of invention and creation exciting LOL, which will fuel my goals a bit further until I finally see enough results for simple aesthetics to propel me along.
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    Aug 24, 2008 7:30 AM GMT
    Sedative saidWell... no. LOL. It's just not in my personality. I've never been the Type-A Go-Getter kind of guy. But yes, in things I have passion for, I really aim to do my best and work hard to give it my best, just not everything.

    My goals and my passion don't always coincide which is why, sadly, my workout goals is harder for me to reach. I get so easily distracted by things I find more interesting.

    So yes, my fitness goals is basically for aesthetics and feeling good rather than competing with myself. I'm honest enough to admit that.

    Lately, I have been slacking a lot since I don't find my current weights enough anymore. They don't even make me sweat as much as I used to. Time to move on. In the absence of a gym, I'm going to make a makeshift cable machine using iron bars, some rope, and weights at the end. I want to get some 'pull' exercises in, since all I've been doing until now is 'push' exercises. Wish me luck and hope I don't break everything in my room doing so. LOL

    At least I find the concept of invention and creation exciting LOL, which will fuel my goals a bit further until I finally see enough results for simple aesthetics to propel me along.


    Just please be careful with this makeshift equipment. I'm aware of an instance in which an actual real professionally manufactured lat pull down machine had its main cable break and the bar came slamming down onto the vertebre of the upper back and thus breaking the spine. If you are mechanically inclined then make sure you have a fail safe lockout. If not then I recommend sand bag training. There are a ton of benefits to using the sand bag method:

    1.) Sand is cheap
    2.) Sandbags are cheap
    3.) A little creativity with sand and sandbags can yield almost any form of resistance imaginable.
    4.) The bags can be used in multiple roles will a simple change of bags.
    5.) It's always very easy to add weight.
    6.) Ask any (almost any) serious mixed martial artist and they will tell you how effective these bags are for training for virtually any event.
    7.) The bags can easily be used for goals of: strength, endurance, hypertrophy,speed, explosive force, sport specific development, and probably quite a few others.
    8.) No gym required, which means you can do the training anytime of day, without any membership fee, and you can do the trainging almost anywhere, thus eliminating all the bad excuses for not working out.

    Anyway that's just a little side thought for you to consider.
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    Aug 24, 2008 7:34 AM GMT
    Even if you don't do this, at least an answer is cool. At least it helps in understanding your unique perspective on why you choose to accept mediocrity in everything you do. I don't mean that at all in a harsh way, perhaps it's just you value things differently or value other things. Regardless any relevant answer is appreciated.

    Come on guys there have to be some people out there aiming for peak performance...
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    Aug 24, 2008 9:27 AM GMT
    Not really mediocrity hehe, but I can't control which areas I'm passionate about the same way you people do. In other areas - art and intellectual side mostly, I go crazy outdoing myself. The fact that everything I know about 3d modeling and digital art is self-taught is an example.

    The rest, I have to force myself to do. I figure it's because I stress too easily. Bleh. Burn out my muse, which is bad for an artist, and I need my muse.

    Anyway, no worries on my little contraption. the rope will be slung over pulleys/bars quite a way off from me, so the weights will never be near me. And thanks for the sandbag suggestions. Been doing similar stuff with backpacks for a while.

    Anywho, I'll leave this thread to the achievers. Heh icon_cool.gif
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    Aug 24, 2008 9:38 AM GMT
    Yes, definitely running. I do always train with heart rate monitor and a GPS. There are certain goals to never drop below a certain speed / HR. Actually it is your fault that since you introduced HIIT to me I want to be able to go from 6 sets 30:90 to 8 sets 60:60. Right now this is the ultimate goal, but I am grinding my teeth on it. I run to get stronger and stronger, I used to powerwalk steep uphill now there is only running .Training in the gym just makes all that easier. I started running a trail on 98 minutes and I am down to 70 now I want to be under 1h by the end of the year which means pretty high speed running uphill. I feel this would be my personal best and that I could not go much further, but that sure won't stop me from trying .Running is mostly training for me, unless I feel out of whack then I exercise it and bite through. I also am constantly seeking advice on the "perfect" form, feedback if I am really doing it 100% correct. I am a bit obsessed doing everything the "right" way. Used to practice the serve in tennis 4x 2h a week just to get certain percentages in certain corners going steady..if that helps you in any way I think if you really like something you will always go for your personal peak and you will most probably need the help of others observing you to get there.
  • UncleverName

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    Aug 25, 2008 12:13 AM GMT
    I personally try to push myself. I don't know if I'd say it's to peak performance. I don't know what that means for me, all the time.
    My trainer pushes me, and I appreciate him pushing me. I have goals, and I strive to beat my previous records.
    The gym/fitness isn't my only thing in life, and sometimes, living to my peak in other areas of my life means sacrificing my fitness time. I still strive to peak, but don't do as well as I could sometimes. That's just how life goes, for me at least.
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    Aug 25, 2008 12:21 AM GMT
    YngHungSFSD saidEven if you don't do this, at least an answer is cool. At least it helps in understanding your unique perspective on why you choose to accept mediocrity in everything you do.


    Yng, you seem like a nice enough guy, so I'll be nice too. Do you have any IDEA how patronizing your statement is? Because someone doesn't want to expend the diminishing returns of time between being merely good at something and being great at it means he is "accepting mediocrity"?

    I know you've been through a tough time lately, but frankly, this is not healthy thinking.
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    Aug 25, 2008 12:55 AM GMT
    i guess i'd fall under both. going the gym affects all areas of my life really

    volleyball - i'm hitting harder, jumping higher, moving quicker too, in fact i think this is the best i've ever played, even better than in high school

    endurance - i used to get tired REALLY fast, especially in my younger years. growing up with a chain smoker really did me in (i had bronchitis and respiratory issues often when i was a youngster). i can run and be active for a long period of time now, i'm super pleased

    strength - i basically had NO upper body strength for a long time too. i struggled to do 10 basic pushups in high school. now, 10 doesn't even dent me in the slightest icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 29, 2008 9:05 PM GMT
    A bit of both here. In the winter, I snowboard, and this is the main sport I try to train for. I'm sure my lower-body workouts will come to a crashing halt once the season starts, as I don't like being sore when I'm ready to go out and shred. I'm no professional or anything, but I have much more fun when I'm good, and try to strive for excellence.

    That said, in the summer through fall, I try to hit legs a LOT. Between weight training, skateboarding, and mountain biking (a newer venture for me), I'm trying to make sure my legs are in top condition to hit the snow next season.

    I've recently become interested in gaining more upper-body strength (for about the last 5 months only, to be honest). In doing so, I've found a love of rock climbing / bouldering as something else to train for. Rock climbing was the activity (sport?) that made me realize how handy forearm / finger strength can be, and how without these, all the bicep and upper back strength in the world won't save you from falling off the face of a mountain with tiny grips.

    I've been a massage therapist for the last 5 years, which has only required minimal training to be able to perform. However, now that my strength is building up a bit, I'm finding that certain massage techniques are much easier to perform, and I can go deeper into my clients' muscles with just my hands that I used to have to use elbows / forearms for.

    After that, I want to have the aesthetic beauty that I feel a lot of hard work goes into. I just find that people respond better to someone who's nice to look at. Sad, but true. I want to be in upper management one day in a corporate job. Unfortunately, I've learned that having good ideas and a functional brain will really only get you so far in life. icon_neutral.gif