Atrophy Pronunciation

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 23, 2012 6:31 AM GMT
    I had a conversation with a friend in health care today about the pronunciation of atrophy.

    Obviously the dictionary says "a-tro-fee" for all uses, noun or verb.

    However, I thought you could say "a-tro-fi" with a long i sound when using it as a verb.

    He has atrophy. It will atrophy. In the latter I had always pronounced it with a long i sound. Apparently, I'm wrong, but maybe it has to do with having parents from Pennsylvania? Anyone else say it funny? My friends thought I was going all sassy on them when I said it that way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 23, 2012 8:25 AM GMT
    I wanna hear you say it. Post a YouTube video of yourself. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 23, 2012 11:10 AM GMT
    You are correct. There is different pronunciation for noun and verb.
  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Sep 23, 2012 11:21 AM GMT
    Mm, from a linguistic point of view, it's "supposed" to be pronounced the same way: a-truh-fee. According to the Macmillan Dictionary (of American Pronunciation) they're said on in the same (as with all other dictionary lookups as well).

    It's just one of those things that people do with either/neither: change the pronunciation based on the context. Why, I don't know.
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    Sep 23, 2012 11:25 AM GMT
    Depends on the region of the country you're in too.
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    Sep 23, 2012 12:00 PM GMT
    Hmm, I'm pretty well traveled and I've only heard it pronounced the one way. Must be a super regional thing.
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    Sep 23, 2012 12:28 PM GMT
    If you say it with conviction it doesn't matter.
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    Sep 23, 2012 12:33 PM GMT
    I've always heard both noun & verb pronounced the same way in the US, as an "ee" ending, not an "eye", including when spoken by doctors in its medical sense. Although it's not a word one hears a great deal as one travels, so I may have passed through areas that use the "eye" verbal pronunciation without knowing it.
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    Sep 23, 2012 12:53 PM GMT
    Thank you for creating this thread. I was up all night worrying about this. icon_sad.gif
  • metatextual

    Posts: 774

    Sep 23, 2012 12:59 PM GMT
    Maybe how one pronounces trophy influences how one says atrophy. I've also heard it pronounced a-tra-fee.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Sep 23, 2012 1:11 PM GMT
    Scruffypup saidThank you for creating this thread. I was up all night worrying about this. icon_sad.gif


    Sorry Scruffy. You should have called and we could have hung out. I was worried, too. Finally, about 5 AM, I got up and looked in the dictionary. Then I fell asleep right away. What an amazing relief!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 23, 2012 1:15 PM GMT
    atrophy ˈa-trə-fē

    I checked some dictionaries, and get the same result for noun & verb, with the long e sound as shown above.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 23, 2012 1:37 PM GMT
    Checked Oxford too. It also says there is only 1 pronunciation. In South Africa, we definitely use a differing pronunciation for the verb.
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    Sep 23, 2012 2:05 PM GMT
    This is medical terminology and a regular dictionary won't do the trick. It is indeed ˈa-trə-fē and, it is not a verb.
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    Sep 23, 2012 2:13 PM GMT
    I've never heard atro-f-eye. Only atro -fee.
  • calibro

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    Sep 23, 2012 2:17 PM GMT
    smudgetool saidThis is medical terminology and a regular dictionary won't do the trick. It is indeed ˈa-trə-fē and, it is not a verb.


    atrophy is certainly a verb
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    Sep 23, 2012 2:34 PM GMT
    smudgetool saidThis is medical terminology and a regular dictionary won't do the trick. It is indeed ˈa-trə-fē and, it is not a verb.

    Your language skills may have atrophied if you don't know that the word atrophy can also be a verb, and has applications outside of the medical.

    His artistic skills atrophied from lack of use. (verb)

    The doctor discovered that the muscle had begun to atrophy from inactivity. (verb)
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    Sep 23, 2012 2:46 PM GMT
    Language likes to make things more simple as it develops. So while the dictionary entries may indicate the same pronunciation, we are seeing two separate pronunciations to differentiate between two parts of speech with drastically different syntactical uses even though their spelled the same way.

    The difference in pronunciation, then, helps us gain better understanding of how the word is used in context. This is particularly important since English is a "speaker-oriented" language in that if there is any miscommunication or misunderstanding, it is generally the fault of the speaker and not the listener. These linguistic cues help us to communicate more effectively.

    For the record, I've always heard the two pronunciations as matched up with their differing parts of speech.
  • metatextual

    Posts: 774

    Sep 23, 2012 2:48 PM GMT
    HungGarSig saidLanguage likes to make things more simple as it develops. So while the dictionary entries may indicate the same pronunciation, we are seeing two separate pronunciations to differentiate between two parts of speech with drastically different syntactical uses even though their spelled the same way.

    The difference in pronunciation, then, helps us gain better understanding of how the word is used in context. This is particularly important since English is a "speaker-oriented" language in that if there is any miscommunication or misunderstanding, it is generally the fault of the speaker and not the listener. These linguistic cues help us to communicate more effectively.

    For the record, I've always heard the two pronunciations as matched up with their differing parts of speech.


    +1, except for 'they're'icon_razz.gif
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    Sep 23, 2012 2:55 PM GMT
    metatextual said
    HungGarSig saidLanguage likes to make things more simple as it develops. So while the dictionary entries may indicate the same pronunciation, we are seeing two separate pronunciations to differentiate between two parts of speech with drastically different syntactical uses even though their spelled the same way.

    The difference in pronunciation, then, helps us gain better understanding of how the word is used in context. This is particularly important since English is a "speaker-oriented" language in that if there is any miscommunication or misunderstanding, it is generally the fault of the speaker and not the listener. These linguistic cues help us to communicate more effectively.

    For the record, I've always heard the two pronunciations as matched up with their differing parts of speech.


    +1, except for 'they're'icon_razz.gif
    ... and "more simple" icon_eek.gif

    grammar.jpg
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    Sep 23, 2012 3:00 PM GMT
    Caslon21000 said
    metatextual said
    HungGarSig saidLanguage likes to make things more simple as it develops. So while the dictionary entries may indicate the same pronunciation, we are seeing two separate pronunciations to differentiate between two parts of speech with drastically different syntactical uses even though their spelled the same way.

    The difference in pronunciation, then, helps us gain better understanding of how the word is used in context. This is particularly important since English is a "speaker-oriented" language in that if there is any miscommunication or misunderstanding, it is generally the fault of the speaker and not the listener. These linguistic cues help us to communicate more effectively.

    For the record, I've always heard the two pronunciations as matched up with their differing parts of speech.


    +1, except for 'they're'icon_razz.gif
    ... and "more simple" icon_eek.gif


    Ugh! That's what I get when I write whilst slightly hungover....
  • metatextual

    Posts: 774

    Sep 23, 2012 3:02 PM GMT
    HungGarSig said
    Caslon21000 said
    metatextual said
    HungGarSig saidLanguage likes to make things more simple as it develops. So while the dictionary entries may indicate the same pronunciation, we are seeing two separate pronunciations to differentiate between two parts of speech with drastically different syntactical uses even though their spelled the same way.

    The difference in pronunciation, then, helps us gain better understanding of how the word is used in context. This is particularly important since English is a "speaker-oriented" language in that if there is any miscommunication or misunderstanding, it is generally the fault of the speaker and not the listener. These linguistic cues help us to communicate more effectively.

    For the record, I've always heard the two pronunciations as matched up with their differing parts of speech.


    +1, except for 'they're'icon_razz.gif
    ... and "more simple" icon_eek.gif


    Ugh! That's what I get when I write whilst slightly hungover....


    write-drunk-edit-sober-ernest-hemingway2
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    Sep 23, 2012 3:20 PM GMT
    metatextual saidwrite-drunk-edit-sober-ernest-hemingway2

    Changing the topic, I recently read a study that may support Hemingway's recommendation. It's established that alcohol can impair higher thinking processes, as well as sensory perception, memory, motor skills & coordination.

    But what's new is the discovery of the possibility that drinking actually helps with creative thinking. Drinking (short of flat-out drunk to the point of incapacitation) lowers inhibitions and in so doing may also result in thinking that's more unconventional, original and out of the box for an individual. In other words, drinking induces traits that are often associated with the creative process.

    So drink a little, develop original thoughts and write them down. Sober up later to correct your grammar & spelling. It seems to have worked for Hemingway.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 23, 2012 3:49 PM GMT
    I have the condition so I have heard it pronounced a lot but I swear in real
    Life it sounds more like at tra phy
  • metatextual

    Posts: 774

    Sep 23, 2012 4:01 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidI have the condition so I have heard it pronounced a lot but I swear in real
    Life it sounds more like at tra phy


    I'm pretty sure it follows that with constant use, a word shortens, just like Toronto is pronounced 'Tranna by natives.