Should I get one or two dogs


  • Sep 24, 2012 3:36 AM GMT
    Thinking about getting a dog, but not sure if I should go for one or two dogs. I've never owned animals in the past, so not sure if this is a good idea. Wondered if anyone here has some advice on (1) breed and (2) whether I should go for two dogs.

    I live in an apartment, but big into running and walking everyday. Since I live in an apartment, I was thinking about getting two dogs so they can keep each other company. But as a first time dog owner, I am afraid that it might be a bad idea.

    Thoughts?
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    Sep 24, 2012 3:44 AM GMT
    Dogs are pack animals so it's more humane to have two than to leave one alone in an apartment or even house for hours. In fact, two may be less problematic because they'll be less likely to act up out of boredom. (Two males might have dominance issues so a spayed and neutered female and male might be best.) I don't know about other areas of the country but in New York City very few buildings allow two dogs, and oftentimes those other few buildings (whether rental, condo or coop) that'd even allow one restrict them further by weight and breed. ("Pet Friendly" does not usually mean "Dog Friendly.") Also, a dog is a long term commitment and unlike cats, require someone to walk them at least once during the work day, and boarding if you're away for extended periods. I waited thirty-three years between dogs - I didn't get another one until I knew I could be home for them. They were each 50lbs and blissfully happy in the apartment - because I'd walk them four times for up to four hours a day in Manhattan, where every third foot of sidewalk provided an exciting new sight, smell or adventure, and I'd oftentimes run them loose in the parks. Just be sure you have the time to take care of them and the finances to not only provide for them but to possibly pay a premium to live in the few apartments that'd allow dogs.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Sep 24, 2012 3:48 AM GMT
    dog_slippers-19727.jpg
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    Sep 24, 2012 3:52 AM GMT
    If this is your first pet, I think one would be the best way to go. Two might be overwhelming.
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    Sep 24, 2012 4:05 AM GMT
    Never been a pet owner? Just get one. Even just one is alot to handle.

    I couldn't imagine walking more than one dog. Although the other guy was right...one dog is gunna get bored and chew shit.
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    Sep 24, 2012 5:48 AM GMT
    Get 1 dog first..train him...have him adjust to you .. then get a second dog slightly younger..The older dog will set examples for the newer dog..
    ..it will take you way less time to train them both..
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    Sep 24, 2012 6:18 AM GMT
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  • Sep 24, 2012 12:11 PM GMT
    Thanks!

    What about breed? I am looking at Australian Shepherds, but I know they can be high energy and may not be good apartment dogs.
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    Sep 24, 2012 12:29 PM GMT
    I have been a dog obedience trainer and seen this go bad too many times... Most of my co-trainers would agree that you're inviting behavioural problems.

    Do NOT get any breed considered to be a working dog, even with another dog as company they will bore easily and can become destructive and noisy.

    I would really recommend against having any dogs, let alone two if you have an apartment without a yard.

    Please reconsider getting dogs, if you really want one or two, get a house with a decent yard first.
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    Sep 24, 2012 12:37 PM GMT
    I absolutely disagree. And in fact that's a stupid thing to tell people. Is it ideal for a dog to have a yard? Yes, yes it is. Is it a bad idea altogether, that should be scrapped? Fuck no. You don't think a dog would much rather be in an apartment with someone who loves him/her than in a pound, on the streets, or in the backyard of an abusive owner?

    As a dog trainer, you should never say that to anyone.


    sc69 saidI have been a dog obedience trainer and seen this go bad too many times... Most of my co-trainers would agree that you're inviting behavioural problems.

    Do NOT get any breed considered to be a working dog, even with another dog as company they will bore easily and can become destructive and noisy.

    I would really recommend against having any dogs, let alone two if you have an apartment without a yard.

    Please reconsider getting dogs, if you really want one or two, get a house with a decent yard first.
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    Sep 24, 2012 12:41 PM GMT
    I have 2 Silky Terriers, kin to a Yorkie. They are father and daughter...I love having them. Nothing like having someone truly glad to see you when you get home, even if you were only gone for 15 minutes icon_biggrin.gif They are under 10 pounds each and low shedding. I have them crate trained and they share when I'm gone for work.
    Check with where you live and see what their rules are first.
  • vintovka

    Posts: 588

    Sep 24, 2012 1:16 PM GMT
    Adopt a mutt! I've had 5 dogs over the years (all adopted) but 4/5 were pure breeds and the fifth (current dog) is a mix of some kind. She is the best dog I've ever owned in terms of temperament and she's beautiful (people are constantly stopping me to ask about her).

    I always went for having two dogs, but there is a problem with that--one dog will die first and then it becomes a cookies and milk dilemma. DO you get another dog to keep the first one company? If so that dog might well outlive the original dog and the cycle starts al over again.

  • Sep 24, 2012 1:17 PM GMT
    How long does it take for a dog's true personality to show? For example, some dogs have a hyper and social attitude, while others may be very shy and reserved.

    I am going to volunteer at a local animal shelter and hope to find a dog to eventually adopt. I was hoping that I would get to know a dog long enough to make sure it is a good match for me (btw I realize the dogs will act differently being trapped in a shelter than at home).
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    Sep 24, 2012 1:25 PM GMT
    ConfederateGhost saidI absolutely disagree. And in fact that's a stupid thing to tell people. Is it ideal for a dog to have a yard? Yes, yes it is. Is it a bad idea altogether, that should be scrapped? Fuck no. You don't think a dog would much rather be in an apartment with someone who loves him/her than in a pound, on the streets, or in the backyard of an abusive owner?

    As a dog trainer, you should never say that to anyone.


    sc69 saidI have been a dog obedience trainer and seen this go bad too many times... Most of my co-trainers would agree that you're inviting behavioural problems.

    Do NOT get any breed considered to be a working dog, even with another dog as company they will bore easily and can become destructive and noisy.

    I would really recommend against having any dogs, let alone two if you have an apartment without a yard.

    Please reconsider getting dogs, if you really want one or two, get a house with a decent yard first.


    Then I guess you've had many, many days of trying to get people's animals to adjust to an environment where they're constantly bombarded with noises, can hear people all around them?

    I've seen some breeds go absolutely stir-crazy in apartments - I've seen owners have to have their animals euthanised because they weren't fit for re-homing, or prescribed sedatives.

    What kind of life is that? - I wouldn't recommend two working dogs in an apartment because I've seen it turn bad.

    If you aren't a dog trainer, then you probably should keep your opinion to yourself, you probably don't have the experience that the OP requires for good advice.

    The best you could offer was

    ConfederateGhost saidNever been a pet owner? Just get one. Even just one is alot to handle.

    I couldn't imagine walking more than one dog. Although the other guy was right...one dog is gunna get bored and chew shit.



    I guess there's no skin in the game for you, the OP can always give up the animal and start again if it doesn't work ? Right??
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    Sep 24, 2012 1:27 PM GMT
    bri_66 saidI have 2 Silky Terriers, kin to a Yorkie. They are father and daughter...I love having them. Nothing like having someone truly glad to see you when you get home, even if you were only gone for 15 minutes icon_biggrin.gif They are under 10 pounds each and low shedding. I have them crate trained and they share when I'm gone for work.
    Check with where you live and see what their rules are first.


    IF you live in an apartment, small terriers are great, not so much if you want to take them running though.
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    Sep 24, 2012 1:35 PM GMT
    as a dog expert because i saw every episode of the dog whisperer.....
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    Sep 24, 2012 1:36 PM GMT
    foosballwizard saidHow long does it take for a dog's true personality to show? For example, some dogs have a hyper and social attitude, while others may be very shy and reserved.

    I am going to volunteer at a local animal shelter and hope to find a dog to eventually adopt. I was hoping that I would get to know a dog long enough to make sure it is a good match for me (btw I realize the dogs will act differently being trapped in a shelter than at home).


    Thats a good idea - maybe you will find a shelter that will assist you to do that - some don't take on volunteers casually.

    Depending on the age of the dog and its prior circumstances, you should get a reasonable idea of the personality of the dog.

    Bear in mind that sheltered animals often have trust issues and while they will re-home, may face abandonment issues and anxieties due to that.

    Dogs that haven't been socialised well can be reserved or aggressive from fear - theres a long road ahead for you if you choose to rescue, it can be very rewarding too.

    Talk to some of the staff there too, find out as much of the history of the dog as you can.

    Think about the types of things you will be doing with the dog, (running etc) think about the amount of time you will have to care for the dog, and also consider the food bills, budget for vaccinations (pet health insurance) , and other incidentals like toys to keep your dogs mind occupied.

    Also think about taking some vacation to settle your new pal in, he/she will need to have some companionship until they settle at your place - it's not a puppy that can necesarily be confined to a crate in most cases, so you may need to establish barriers initially.

    You will need to gradually get the dog used to the fact you wont be there all the time (unless you can take the dog with you to work)

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    Sep 24, 2012 1:52 PM GMT
    try one first. if you like it and can handle it then go for the second.

    look into types of dogs that get along. because unless they r both pups it might be harder for them to get along.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19119

    Sep 24, 2012 1:55 PM GMT
    If you live in an apartment, I would not even consider getting a dog unless you are getting small dogs that can be house dogs and appropriate for that living space. It's just not fair to have a large dog cooped up in an apartment. I have two dogs and I find it much easier than one, mostly because they keep each other company, they have each other to hang with and play with, and they don't depend solely on YOU for their activity and attention. Dogs generally are happier if they have a playmate and companion. Also, if you are gone much of the day, and your dogs will be stuck inside, get yourself the large size of "The Potty Patch". Trust me, it will be the best investment you make for your dogs and will make your life much easier.

    https://www.pottypatch.com/default.aspx?id=&refcode=1002
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    Sep 24, 2012 1:58 PM GMT
    A simple search...

    http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/10-best-apartment-dogs

    My pick of the top 10 is this...

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTupTOYginEcaoKlyVD8db

    French bulldog.
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    Sep 24, 2012 2:42 PM GMT
    Get one. I just got a dog myself, snow white lab, and I didn't realize all the work that goes into one. I had a black lab growing up and remembered it wasn't so bad, but I look back on it now and think I did have mom and dad. Im really lucky that my roommates love my dog and treat her as its their own. It has become a house dog and our mascot lol. But yeah only get one...Also you have to research the breed of the dog and make sure you find which dog fits your personality.

    Also if you are going to be at work or travel a lot I would refrain from getting one. A dog needs love all the time. I had to go out of town for a whole month and felt awful leaving my dog, thank God I have roommates.

    Good luck!
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    Sep 24, 2012 2:48 PM GMT
    Just one
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    Sep 24, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    dude I love dogs but if you've never even owned a pet I would start with something that you keep in a cage...Dogs are a huge responsibility and training them is really important too...too many people get them and not knowing what their getting into and you can fuck them up and they'll be another poor dog in the pound or shelter because you didn't know what you were doing.. puppies need a ton of attention for the first year...if you really got your heart set on a dog I would get a little older one from a shelter.
  • Bull777333

    Posts: 85

    Sep 24, 2012 3:01 PM GMT
    TWO! because dogs fucking rock and the more the merrier. So much cuddling and playtime.
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    Sep 24, 2012 3:12 PM GMT
    Taking on the responsibility of a dog is a long-term commitment--emotionally and financially. Keep in mind that you'll have to provide and care for this companion for 12-14 years, or perhaps longer.

    Are you prepared to take care of your companions grooming, vaccinations, exercise, dental care, etc. And what about traveling? Who will watch the dog while you're away?

    Just a few things to consider.