Distributing oxygen masks with built in feeding tubes to the majority of the continental U.S.A.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 28, 2012 1:46 AM GMT
    Hows the evacuation from Yellowstone coming? Are we getting all the supplies moved to the East coast productively?
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    Sep 28, 2012 1:49 AM GMT
    What the hell you talking about?
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    Sep 28, 2012 2:13 AM GMT
    LitAwake saidHows the evacuation from Yellowstone coming? Are we getting all the supplies moved to the East coast productively?

    The bears have been relocated to Provincetown.
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    Sep 28, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    I like the design of this type of city.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HrPGfn47t0&feature=youtube_gdata_player

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    Sep 28, 2012 2:56 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidWhat the hell you talking about?


    Volcanic ash is toxic, not breathable. So we should relocate as much resources as we can because they would be difficult to recover. Also shelters need to be built that cleans the ash off people when they enter.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Sep 28, 2012 3:04 AM GMT
    Are you referencing a supervolcanic eruption? While a valid threat, you need to do a serious risk assessment and realize there are, literally, hundreds of other things more likely, statistically, to take you out.

    Humans are notoriously horrible risk evaluators. So here's a scientific look, complete with numbers. Now pick your new favorite disaster to worry about that at least has SOME chance of actually occurring, statistically speaking:

    http://www.squidoo.com/oddsdying
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    Sep 28, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    From my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Sep 28, 2012 6:29 AM GMT
    ParadiseLost saidFrom my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.


    That's a bit hyperbolic. We have more than enough genetic diversity to steer clear of the dangers on inbreeding.
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    Sep 28, 2012 6:49 AM GMT
    JackBlair69 said
    LitAwake saidI like the design of this type of city.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HrPGfn47t0&feature=youtube_gdata_player



    It looks cool and fun. But something like this would quickly turn into a dystopian hellhole, worse than Blade Runner.


    I was looking for another type called a garden city, also circular (not all are though), and found that one. Just thought its kinda neat with its shifting skylines and zero emissions.
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    Sep 28, 2012 7:19 AM GMT
    LitAwake saidI like the design of this type of city.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HrPGfn47t0&feature=youtube_gdata_player


    Nice design but I am getting dizzy, so where are the disposable vomit bag stations.
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    Sep 28, 2012 7:40 AM GMT
    We can call our gatherings Operation "Scavenger". I really don't think we could build a dome to cover over 45 mile diameter, that was a joke.
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    Sep 28, 2012 8:41 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    ParadiseLost saidFrom my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.


    That's a bit hyperbolic. We have more than enough genetic diversity to steer clear of the dangers on inbreeding.


    It's just my opinion, honestly. icon_smile.gif I say this because I read once in a science article somewhere about how a lot of the diseases that are happening attributed to "bad gene" may be because our genetic pool is stagnant and fairly finite. I'm no biologist nor do I do cellular research for a living so you're free to rebut this or prove it wrong. It does seem to make sense to me though.

    That said, I do know for a fact the diversity of our gene pool is very finite. Then again homo-sapiens are a relatively "young" species. :3

    Trollileo saidI love how we're talking about inbreeding on a gay website.


    Is that because gay men do not breed or are you referencing the sexual term that gay men sometimes use when describing vulgar kinky sex? :3
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    Sep 28, 2012 11:44 AM GMT
    ParadiseLost saidFrom my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.

    "The three super eruptions occurred 2.1 million, 1.3 million, and 640,000 years ago,..."

    So super eruptions are more like 600,000 and 800,000 years apart. Not 100,000.
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    Sep 28, 2012 1:00 PM GMT
    I'd be more concerned about the zombie apocalypse if I were you.

    Get A Kit,    Make A Plan, Be Prepared. emergency.cdc.gov
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Sep 28, 2012 2:43 PM GMT
    smudgetool saidI'd be more concerned about the zombie apocalypse if I were you.

    Get A Kit,    Make A Plan, Be Prepared. emergency.cdc.gov


    i got that covered, always sleep with a cricket bat next to the bed.
    shaun-of-the-dead-cricket-bat.jpg
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    Sep 28, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    ParadiseLost said
    Medjai said
    ParadiseLost saidFrom my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.


    That's a bit hyperbolic. We have more than enough genetic diversity to steer clear of the dangers on inbreeding.


    It's just my opinion, honestly. icon_smile.gif I say this because I read once in a science article somewhere about how a lot of the diseases that are happening attributed to "bad gene" may be because our genetic pool is stagnant and fairly finite. I'm no biologist nor do I do cellular research for a living so you're free to rebut this or prove it wrong. It does seem to make sense to me though.

    That said, I do know for a fact the diversity of our gene pool is very finite. Then again homo-sapiens are a relatively "young" species. :3

    Trollileo saidI love how we're talking about inbreeding on a gay website.


    Is that because gay men do not breed or are you referencing the sexual term that gay men sometimes use when describing vulgar kinky sex? :3


    a stagnant gene pool is different from saying that we're not genetically diverse.

    in the wild, if an animal has a bad genetic disease, it dies. if the animal hasn't reproduced, its "bad genes" will not be passed on to the next generation.

    humans give medicine and support to other humans with bad genetic diseases. sometimes they are better able to survive until reproduction as a result. these genetic disease then are't under a purifying selection as they might be in the animal world.... causing stagnation... but that doesn't mean we're not genetically diverse
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    Sep 28, 2012 3:07 PM GMT
    ParadiseLost saidFrom my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.


    actually IIRC we're due for another one fairly soon. Also, if you want to survive your best bet is to move to the other side of the planet. The shockwave alone will likely obliterate the inhabitants of the North American continent and then bury us in pyroclastics
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    Sep 28, 2012 3:20 PM GMT
    RoadsterRacer87 said

    actually IIRC we're due for another one fairly soon. Also, if you want to survive your best bet is to move to the other side of the planet. The shockwave alone will likely obliterate the inhabitants of the North American continent and then bury us in pyroclastics


    Ooooh, you said pyroclastics. I loves me some volcanology.icon_biggrin.gif

    how-you-doin_1334975001_epiclolcom.jpeg?
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Sep 28, 2012 3:25 PM GMT
    homastj said
    a stagnant gene pool is different from saying that we're not genetically diverse.

    in the wild, if an animal has a bad genetic disease, it dies. if the animal hasn't reproduced, its "bad genes" will not be passed on to the next generation.

    humans give medicine and support to other humans with bad genetic diseases. sometimes they are better able to survive until reproduction as a result. these genetic disease then are't under a purifying selection as they might be in the animal world.... causing stagnation... but that doesn't mean we're not genetically diverse


    We are hardly stagnant either...

    We experience different pressures than other life, true, but don't make the mistake of thinking humans as a spiecies no longer face any pressure. We are making a multitude of adaptations right now that are being recorded. These changes have been so significant that experts are debating as to whether or not we can be considered a divergent species from the original Homo sapiens.
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    Sep 28, 2012 3:33 PM GMT
    Medjai said
    homastj said
    a stagnant gene pool is different from saying that we're not genetically diverse.

    in the wild, if an animal has a bad genetic disease, it dies. if the animal hasn't reproduced, its "bad genes" will not be passed on to the next generation.

    humans give medicine and support to other humans with bad genetic diseases. sometimes they are better able to survive until reproduction as a result. these genetic disease then are't under a purifying selection as they might be in the animal world.... causing stagnation... but that doesn't mean we're not genetically diverse


    We are hardly stagnant either...

    We experience different pressures than other life, true, but don't make the mistake of thinking humans as a spiecies no longer face any pressure. We are making a multitude of adaptations right now that are being recorded. These changes have been so significant that experts are debating as to whether or not we can be considered a divergent species from the original Homo sapiens.


    And what are some of the changes you speak of?

    I want to know more.icon_smile.gif
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Sep 28, 2012 4:05 PM GMT
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/20/science/20adapt.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070711134400.htm

    There's one more that I know is a recent adaptation that I didn't see mentioned, and that is lactose tolerance.

    We are still a growing species. Don't think biology stops because culture develops.
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    Sep 28, 2012 5:09 PM GMT
    Medjai saidhttp://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/20/science/20adapt.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070711134400.htm

    There's one more that I know is a recent adaptation that I didn't see mentioned, and that is lactose tolerance.

    We are still a growing species. Don't think biology stops because culture develops.


    Interesting articles, thanks for sharing!
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    Sep 28, 2012 5:12 PM GMT
    showme said
    RoadsterRacer87 said

    actually IIRC we're due for another one fairly soon. Also, if you want to survive your best bet is to move to the other side of the planet. The shockwave alone will likely obliterate the inhabitants of the North American continent and then bury us in pyroclastics


    Ooooh, you said pyroclastics. I loves me some volcanology.icon_biggrin.gif

    how-you-doin_1334975001_epiclolcom.jpeg?


    lol, i was a geology geek as a kid icon_cool.gif
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    Sep 28, 2012 5:34 PM GMT
    homastj said
    ParadiseLost said
    Medjai said
    ParadiseLost saidFrom my understanding of the caldera at the heart of the super volcano, it likely isn't going to explode in our life time. Besides, if it does erupt, we'll have more than just ash and oxygen masks to worry about. 3 feet of ash throughout the United States. This kind of volcano explodes once every 100,000 years or so. They are one of the TRUE harbingers of extreme climate change and global cooling. Lake Toba in Sumatra is one good example.

    We barely escaped the last one 100,000 years ago, which may explain why we are so genetically unvaried as human beings. Our genetic diversity is craptastic. We're not inbreeding but we're mighty close to it.


    That's a bit hyperbolic. We have more than enough genetic diversity to steer clear of the dangers on inbreeding.


    It's just my opinion, honestly. icon_smile.gif I say this because I read once in a science article somewhere about how a lot of the diseases that are happening attributed to "bad gene" may be because our genetic pool is stagnant and fairly finite. I'm no biologist nor do I do cellular research for a living so you're free to rebut this or prove it wrong. It does seem to make sense to me though.

    That said, I do know for a fact the diversity of our gene pool is very finite. Then again homo-sapiens are a relatively "young" species. :3

    Trollileo saidI love how we're talking about inbreeding on a gay website.


    Is that because gay men do not breed or are you referencing the sexual term that gay men sometimes use when describing vulgar kinky sex? :3


    a stagnant gene pool is different from saying that we're not genetically diverse.

    in the wild, if an animal has a bad genetic disease, it dies. if the animal hasn't reproduced, its "bad genes" will not be passed on to the next generation.

    humans give medicine and support to other humans with bad genetic diseases. sometimes they are better able to survive until reproduction as a result. these genetic disease then are't under a purifying selection as they might be in the animal world.... causing stagnation... but that doesn't mean we're not genetically diverse


    I'm not saying we lack genetic diversity altogether, handsome! I'm saying it's limited and that's because it is. icon_smile.gif Chimps, for example, have waaaaaay more diversity than we do and we broke away from their family 5 to 6 million years ago but aren't nearly as diverse as they are.

    My statement have nothing do medicine because, unless I'm mistaken (which I admit I may be!), medicine does not fix parts of our gene pool that have become damage by breeding with those people who became carriers of those gene traits.

    Oh and the stagnation and inbreeding thing was more of my observation, not a fact. +D I'm only expressing my opinion in these matters and I admit I am not an expert in the field. icon_smile.gif

    I do think it's interesting that we still have these evolutionary shifts/adaptions being made, even in this short of time. Then again, adaptions, such as these, are observed far quicker in other species like rats/mice and of course FRUIT FLIES! icon_biggrin.gif

    On a sillier note: I hope I can be the father of all future mutants and start the X-wars on Earth, fufufufu. >:3
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    Sep 28, 2012 6:24 PM GMT
    Does Google Earth have a topographical feature? how often is it updated?