Thomas Sowell said:

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    Sep 29, 2012 8:42 PM GMT
    I have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.
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    Sep 29, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    tru_blu_auzzie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It's giving back to the society you benefited from.
    Think of that the next time you flush a toilet and it doesn't simply spew into the front yard.
    Think of that the next time you travel on a public road or require the police.

    Think of that the next time you see the destitute going though the dump or living in cardboard shanty towns in other countries, and how everyone (who can) pays something so that doesn't occur in your backyard.
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    Sep 29, 2012 9:05 PM GMT
    Perfect example of how two individuals can look at the same issue and see two entirely different things.
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    Sep 29, 2012 9:15 PM GMT
    tru_blu_auzzie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Who ever said money earned honestly is not yours to keep? And why wouldn't taking from others unfairly be considered greed, if not theft?

    Your statement from Sowell is unclear. What are your specific examples?
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    Sep 29, 2012 9:16 PM GMT
    Blakes7 saidPerfect example of how two individuals can look at the same issue and see two entirely different things.


    Perfect example of how a third can make an incorrect assessment.
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    Sep 29, 2012 9:20 PM GMT
    Meaning what?
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    Sep 29, 2012 11:00 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    tru_blu_auzzie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take some body's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It's giving back to the society you benefited from.
    Think of that the next time you flush a toilet and it doesn't simply spew into the front yard.
    Think of that the next time you travel on a public road or require the police.

    Think of that the next time you see the destitute going though the dump or living in cardboard shanty towns in other countries, and how everyone (who can) pays something so that doesn't occur in your backyard.


    Having a Treatment Plant everytime we flush one of our toilets it flows down around the back of our back yard.; that we pay to run and too maintain, as well we pay rates too. We both pay taxes, and registration and insurance for our cars too, so it's all covered; thus we already give back, and are not putting our hands out, or sitting on our arses, wanting others to pay our way.

    No there is nothing selfish about us wanting to keep our money in our banks and hands, that we have earned. We owe another nothing; yet pay to house, feed and educate, other men's sperm too. Why should we pay for irresponsible breeding? But we do.

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    Sep 29, 2012 11:08 PM GMT
    I was once watching a football game and this running back ran some 60 yards and scored a touchdown and did this wonderful self indulgent dance to celebrate this accomplishment. In the replay you could see how the other 10 players on his team took part in his success, you know, blocking other defensive players or faking out some of the linebackers, that sort of thing, but by the time the touchdown was scored, the running back seemed positive that somehow he had scored that touchdown all by himself.
    Sometimes greedy capitalists seem to feel this same way. After years of public education and the use of all the roads, police, loans, banking systems and a safe country (secured by a military they often never saw fit to enlist in) to build their future on, when they do save and invest and create a business of some sort and find real success, they want to take all the credit for their accomplishment, seeming to forget about all the others who helped along the way.
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    Sep 30, 2012 12:16 AM GMT
    tru_blu_auzzie said
    meninlove said
    tru_blu_auzzie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take some body's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It's giving back to the society you benefited from.
    Think of that the next time you flush a toilet and it doesn't simply spew into the front yard.
    Think of that the next time you travel on a public road or require the police.

    Think of that the next time you see the destitute going though the dump or living in cardboard shanty towns in other countries, and how everyone (who can) pays something so that doesn't occur in your backyard.


    Having a Treatment Plant everytime we flush one of our toilets it flows down around the back of our back yard.; that we pay to run and too maintain, as well we pay rates too. We both pay taxes, and registration and insurance for our cars too, so it's all covered; thus we already give back, and are not putting our hands out, or sitting on our arses, wanting others to pay our way.

    No there is nothing selfish about us wanting to keep our money in our banks and hands, that we have earned. We owe another nothing; yet pay to house, feed and educate, other men's sperm too. Why should we pay for irresponsible breeding? But we do.



    Oh PS: and not only do we pay for our own Health Care, we pay for those on Government assistance too; so why should we pay more just because we are well off?
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    Sep 30, 2012 1:02 AM GMT
    smartmoney saidI was once watching a football game and this running back ran some 60 yards and scored a touchdown and did this wonderful self indulgent dance to celebrate this accomplishment. In the replay you could see how the other 10 players on his team took part in his success, you know, blocking other defensive players or faking out some of the linebackers, that sort of thing, but by the time the touchdown was scored, the running back seemed positive that somehow he had scored that touchdown all by himself.
    Sometimes greedy capitalists seem to feel this same way. After years of public education and the use of all the roads, police, loans, banking systems and a safe country (secured by a military they often never saw fit to enlist in) to build their future on, when they do save and invest and create a business of some sort and find real success, they want to take all the credit for their accomplishment, seeming to forget about all the others who helped along the way.

    A suitable analogy. In our modern interconnected world, nobody really does something 100% on their own. Even if I have some sudden brilliant stroke of insight, some genius idea out of nowhere, is it really all my own?

    What about the farmers who raised the healthy food I ate, that nourished my brain? What about the schools that developed my mind? And what about my parents, who gave me my genes, that made me in the first place?

    I take credit for the things I've accomplished, but I also credit the supporting structure that made it possible. Americans love the myth of the rugged individualist, but there really is no such thing.

    As independent as you may try to make yourself, you are never an island. We humans are social creatures, and we can no more live completely on our own than a bee can live without its hive.

    That realization is a humbling experience. It was for me, that I am part of something greater than me. Something I can contribute to, but that I cannot live without. I accept that subordinate status, that the whole is greater than myself.

    In response I try to make my contributions, to make my mark. Maybe not a very big mark, but some kind of mark, that I didn't just take but also gave. And that's the philosophy that guides my life.
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    Sep 30, 2012 11:40 AM GMT
    Blakes7 saidPerfect example of how two individuals can look at the same issue and see two entirely different things.


    The same can be said about many things, like is the glass half empty or full? One may see it as being half full and the other half empty.
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    Sep 30, 2012 11:59 AM GMT
    Yes. The problem is many cannot see the other's point of view, or they just refuse to acknowlege it.
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    Sep 30, 2012 2:29 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    tru_blu_auzzie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It's giving back to the society you benefited from.
    Think of that the next time you flush a toilet and it doesn't simply spew into the front yard.
    Think of that the next time you travel on a public road or require the police.

    Think of that the next time you see the destitute going though the dump or living in cardboard shanty towns in other countries, and how everyone (who can) pays something so that doesn't occur in your backyard.


    "Giving it back" or "being seized"? icon_wink.gif
  • HottJoe

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    Sep 30, 2012 2:46 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    smartmoney saidI was once watching a football game and this running back ran some 60 yards and scored a touchdown and did this wonderful self indulgent dance to celebrate this accomplishment. In the replay you could see how the other 10 players on his team took part in his success, you know, blocking other defensive players or faking out some of the linebackers, that sort of thing, but by the time the touchdown was scored, the running back seemed positive that somehow he had scored that touchdown all by himself.
    Sometimes greedy capitalists seem to feel this same way. After years of public education and the use of all the roads, police, loans, banking systems and a safe country (secured by a military they often never saw fit to enlist in) to build their future on, when they do save and invest and create a business of some sort and find real success, they want to take all the credit for their accomplishment, seeming to forget about all the others who helped along the way.

    A suitable analogy. In our modern interconnected world, nobody really does something 100% on their own. Even if I have some sudden brilliant stroke of insight, some genius idea out of nowhere, is it really all my own?

    What about the farmers who raised the healthy food I ate, that nourished my brain? What about the schools that developed my mind? And what about my parents, who gave me my genes, that made me in the first place?

    I take credit for the things I've accomplished, but I also credit the supporting structure that made it possible. Americans love the myth of the rugged individualist, but there really is no such thing.

    As independent as you may try to make yourself, you are never an island. We humans are social creatures, and we can no more live completely on our own than a bee can live without its hive.

    That realization is a humbling experience. It was for me, that I am part of something greater than me. Something I can contribute to, but that I cannot live without. I accept that subordinate status, that the whole is greater than myself.

    In response I try to make my contributions, to make my mark. Maybe not a very big mark, but some kind of mark, that I didn't just take but also gave. And that's the philosophy that guides my life.


    I love both of these posts. And to add to Art's no man is an island theme, I recently saw an expose about solitary confinement in prisons. Apparently it's a form of torture, and prolonged forced solitude actually causes brain damage. We're literally hardwired to be social and only a tiny percentage of humans can thrive left entirely alone, and even the true loners need outlets like books or art projects to keep them from declining.
  • HottJoe

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    Sep 30, 2012 2:49 PM GMT
    mocktwinkles said
    meninlove said
    tru_blu_auzzie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It's giving back to the society you benefited from.
    Think of that the next time you flush a toilet and it doesn't simply spew into the front yard.
    Think of that the next time you travel on a public road or require the police.

    Think of that the next time you see the destitute going though the dump or living in cardboard shanty towns in other countries, and how everyone (who can) pays something so that doesn't occur in your backyard.


    "Giving it back" or "being seized"? icon_wink.gif


    You can't escape death or taxes, not even if you're Al Capone.icon_wink.gif
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    Oct 02, 2012 6:34 PM GMT
    tru_blu_aussie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It is greed when the richest 400 Americans pay an individual personal income tax rate of just 18% (or just 14% in Romney's case) while we wage earners pay a higher tax rate.
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    Oct 02, 2012 7:20 PM GMT
    sfbayguy said
    tru_blu_aussie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It is greed when the richest 400 Americans pay an individual personal income tax rate of just 18% (or just 14% in Romney's case) while we wage earners pay a higher tax rate.


    But the wealthy give back something that the wage earns does not, employment for one; and not even Obama can do that. The left overlook Ten Kennedy for murder, but forgive the right for nothing.
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    Oct 02, 2012 7:42 PM GMT
    tru_blu_aussie said
    sfbayguy said
    tru_blu_aussie saidI have never understood why is is "greed" to want to keep money you've earned, but not greed to want to take somebody's else's money.

    Amen my brother.


    It is greed when the richest 400 Americans pay an individual personal income tax rate of just 18% (or just 14% in Romney's case) while we wage earners pay a higher tax rate.


    But the wealthy give back something that the wage earns does not, employment for one; and not even Obama can do that. The left overlook Ten Kennedy for murder, but forgive the right for nothing.


    Really? Wage earners don't give back something? They don't give back employment? Do you not understand how a consumer economy works? Wage earners create the vast majority of demand for and spend money on goods and services. When there is more demand for a good or a service, more people are employed in the production of that good or service to meet that demand. With out wage earners, we'd have practically no economy and no employment...and less wealth for the richest 400 Americans.

    BTW, the vast majority of Americans are employed in small businesses, that are NOT owned by the wealthiest 400 Americans, but are owned by people who are also wage earners that pay a higher individual personal income tax rate than the 400 richest Americans. But according to you, only the 400 richest Americans give something back like employment.