Sonobello and other liposuction plastic surgeries

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    Oct 05, 2012 4:00 AM GMT
    I don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells? It makes sense considering that if muscles are glycogen saturated, where is the glucose going to go? It's just going to raise their blood sugar. This will increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, EVEN THOUGH they look better from the outside. These people are not going to be making dietary changes following surgery because this is a quick fix for their aesthetic needs. Instead, you are increasing their risk of diabetes and health complications due to less ability to store energy. I saw a patient in the hospital recently who had lap band surgery and only lost 10 lbs in 3 years. Seriously? That's horrible...she's STILL in the hospital now with worse complications.

    I realize that MDs have large educational bills to pay, but if MDs are to be respected, it is irresponsible business at the expense of desperate, uneducated lay people. Surgery doesn't fix everything.

    For the price of liposuction, they could get 10-20 sessions with a dietitian, depending on location and experience. People get results in fewer sessions than that!
  • blueandgold

    Posts: 396

    Oct 05, 2012 10:26 AM GMT
    Hush now, honey boo boo. Let people do what they do. Elective surgeries are just that, elective!
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    Oct 05, 2012 10:57 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidFor the price of liposuction, they could get 10-20 sessions with a dietitian, depending on location and experience. People get results in fewer sessions than that!

    Spoken like a dietician. Oh, wait, you ARE studying to be a dietician. icon_rolleyes.gif

    But I do agree with much of what you say. Potential problems with liposuction are only now beginning to be revealed after years of experience with these relatively recent procedures.

    One is that the body will try to store fat wherever it can as a survival response, when excess food sources are available to it. So that you can surgically remove a man's belly fat and his body will find other places to build new fat, if he continues to eat too much and exercise too little.

    But now only recently, after enough years have passed since liposuction has become a widespread practice, has there been evidence that even the removed fat cells will grow back, right where they were before. It appears that liposuction is not a permanent fix, as was originally thought. Some body sculpting improvements can be achieved in the near term, but lifetime freedom from weight gain now seems less likely for most individuals who fail to follow-up with traditional dietary & exercise methods.
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    Oct 05, 2012 5:15 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells? It makes sense considering that if muscles are glycogen saturated, where is the glucose going to go? It's just going to raise their blood sugar. This will increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, EVEN THOUGH they look better from the outside. These people are not going to be making dietary changes following surgery because this is a quick fix for their aesthetic needs. Instead, you are increasing their risk of diabetes and health complications due to less ability to store energy. I saw a patient in the hospital recently who had lap band surgery and only lost 10 lbs in 3 years. Seriously? That's horrible...she's STILL in the hospital now with worse complications.

    I realize that MDs have large educational bills to pay, but if MDs are to be respected, it is irresponsible business at the expense of desperate, uneducated lay people. Surgery doesn't fix everything.

    For the price of liposuction, they could get 10-20 sessions with a dietitian, depending on location and experience. People get results in fewer sessions than that!


    Wow, you're making a lot of assumptions here... Please point me to the studies showing that liposuction increases the odds of getting diabetes.

    Also, you do know that liposuction doesn't remove ALL a person's fat right? Fat is stored all over the body, so even if ALL the fat from a specific area is removed, the body still has plenty left...

    Since rats develop diabetes faster with less fat, are you advocating that everyone increase their body fat levels? Interesting advice, if so...

    And lastly, what does lap band surgery have to do with liposuction?


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    Oct 06, 2012 2:40 AM GMT
    sctsm said
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells? It makes sense considering that if muscles are glycogen saturated, where is the glucose going to go? It's just going to raise their blood sugar. This will increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, EVEN THOUGH they look better from the outside. These people are not going to be making dietary changes following surgery because this is a quick fix for their aesthetic needs. Instead, you are increasing their risk of diabetes and health complications due to less ability to store energy. I saw a patient in the hospital recently who had lap band surgery and only lost 10 lbs in 3 years. Seriously? That's horrible...she's STILL in the hospital now with worse complications.

    I realize that MDs have large educational bills to pay, but if MDs are to be respected, it is irresponsible business at the expense of desperate, uneducated lay people. Surgery doesn't fix everything.

    For the price of liposuction, they could get 10-20 sessions with a dietitian, depending on location and experience. People get results in fewer sessions than that!


    Wow, you're making a lot of assumptions here... Please point me to the studies showing that liposuction increases the odds of getting diabetes.

    Also, you do know that liposuction doesn't remove ALL a person's fat right? Fat is stored all over the body, so even if ALL the fat from a specific area is removed, the body still has plenty left...

    Since rats develop diabetes faster with less fat, are you advocating that everyone increase their body fat levels? Interesting advice, if so...

    And lastly, what does lap band surgery have to do with liposuction?




    You're capable of doing the literature search as much as me.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18451064
    Here's ONE example. [2008] Read the first two lines of the abstract. It's BACKGROUND info, which means this is well known, and I am not making any gross assumptions.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11681812
    Review article from 2001. Like I said, this is a well known fact that is in no way a gross assumption.

    No shit liposuction doesn't remove all fat in the body. You're not doing yourself a favor (nor is anyone) by having this procedure done from a metabolic health standpoint long-term.

    No I am not advocating increasing body fat levels. That's not what I said at all. I said removal of fat cells. Not body fat levels. The body's cells just get larger and larger after adulthood rather than divide (unless you reach upper classes of obesity).

    I'm also sorry you didn't see the evident connection between lap band surgery and liposuction. Both are forms of surgery to "correct" behavior/dietary/fitness dearths of character. A quick fix to an obese person or person not willing to make behavioral dietary/fitness changes is not helping that person, nor is it helping our healthcare system.
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    Oct 08, 2012 5:42 PM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    sctsm said
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells? It makes sense considering that if muscles are glycogen saturated, where is the glucose going to go? It's just going to raise their blood sugar. This will increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, EVEN THOUGH they look better from the outside. These people are not going to be making dietary changes following surgery because this is a quick fix for their aesthetic needs. Instead, you are increasing their risk of diabetes and health complications due to less ability to store energy. I saw a patient in the hospital recently who had lap band surgery and only lost 10 lbs in 3 years. Seriously? That's horrible...she's STILL in the hospital now with worse complications.

    I realize that MDs have large educational bills to pay, but if MDs are to be respected, it is irresponsible business at the expense of desperate, uneducated lay people. Surgery doesn't fix everything.

    For the price of liposuction, they could get 10-20 sessions with a dietitian, depending on location and experience. People get results in fewer sessions than that!


    Wow, you're making a lot of assumptions here... Please point me to the studies showing that liposuction increases the odds of getting diabetes.

    Also, you do know that liposuction doesn't remove ALL a person's fat right? Fat is stored all over the body, so even if ALL the fat from a specific area is removed, the body still has plenty left...

    Since rats develop diabetes faster with less fat, are you advocating that everyone increase their body fat levels? Interesting advice, if so...

    And lastly, what does lap band surgery have to do with liposuction?




    You're capable of doing the literature search as much as me.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18451064
    Here's ONE example. [2008] Read the first two lines of the abstract. It's BACKGROUND info, which means this is well known, and I am not making any gross assumptions.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11681812
    Review article from 2001. Like I said, this is a well known fact that is in no way a gross assumption.

    No shit liposuction doesn't remove all fat in the body. You're not doing yourself a favor (nor is anyone) by having this procedure done from a metabolic health standpoint long-term.

    No I am not advocating increasing body fat levels. That's not what I said at all. I said removal of fat cells. Not body fat levels. The body's cells just get larger and larger after adulthood rather than divide (unless you reach upper classes of obesity).

    I'm also sorry you didn't see the evident connection between lap band surgery and liposuction. Both are forms of surgery to "correct" behavior/dietary/fitness dearths of character. A quick fix to an obese person or person not willing to make behavioral dietary/fitness changes is not helping that person, nor is it helping our healthcare system.



    Uh, neither of those studies discusses liposuction (or even implies that LOCALIZED removal of adipose tissue has any effect on insulin resistance).

    Liposuction does not equal Lipodystrophy.

    I'll stick with my assertion that you are making unsubstantiated connections between diabetes and liposuction.
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    Oct 09, 2012 12:02 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells?
    Did you know that rats are not people?

    Liposuction is great for previously-obese people who have unattached fat hanging in a bag of loose skin around their waistline.

    Maybe they should make mice obese and see how fast they get diabetes.
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    Oct 12, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    sctsm said
    bluey2223 said
    sctsm said
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells? It makes sense considering that if muscles are glycogen saturated, where is the glucose going to go? It's just going to raise their blood sugar. This will increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, EVEN THOUGH they look better from the outside. These people are not going to be making dietary changes following surgery because this is a quick fix for their aesthetic needs. Instead, you are increasing their risk of diabetes and health complications due to less ability to store energy. I saw a patient in the hospital recently who had lap band surgery and only lost 10 lbs in 3 years. Seriously? That's horrible...she's STILL in the hospital now with worse complications.

    I realize that MDs have large educational bills to pay, but if MDs are to be respected, it is irresponsible business at the expense of desperate, uneducated lay people. Surgery doesn't fix everything.

    For the price of liposuction, they could get 10-20 sessions with a dietitian, depending on location and experience. People get results in fewer sessions than that!


    Wow, you're making a lot of assumptions here... Please point me to the studies showing that liposuction increases the odds of getting diabetes.

    Also, you do know that liposuction doesn't remove ALL a person's fat right? Fat is stored all over the body, so even if ALL the fat from a specific area is removed, the body still has plenty left...

    Since rats develop diabetes faster with less fat, are you advocating that everyone increase their body fat levels? Interesting advice, if so...

    And lastly, what does lap band surgery have to do with liposuction?




    You're capable of doing the literature search as much as me.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18451064
    Here's ONE example. [2008] Read the first two lines of the abstract. It's BACKGROUND info, which means this is well known, and I am not making any gross assumptions.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11681812
    Review article from 2001. Like I said, this is a well known fact that is in no way a gross assumption.

    No shit liposuction doesn't remove all fat in the body. You're not doing yourself a favor (nor is anyone) by having this procedure done from a metabolic health standpoint long-term.

    No I am not advocating increasing body fat levels. That's not what I said at all. I said removal of fat cells. Not body fat levels. The body's cells just get larger and larger after adulthood rather than divide (unless you reach upper classes of obesity).

    I'm also sorry you didn't see the evident connection between lap band surgery and liposuction. Both are forms of surgery to "correct" behavior/dietary/fitness dearths of character. A quick fix to an obese person or person not willing to make behavioral dietary/fitness changes is not helping that person, nor is it helping our healthcare system.



    Uh, neither of those studies discusses liposuction (or even implies that LOCALIZED removal of adipose tissue has any effect on insulin resistance).

    Liposuction does not equal Lipodystrophy.

    I'll stick with my assertion that you are making unsubstantiated connections between diabetes and liposuction.


    The studies say that removal of fat tissue leads to diabetic symptoms. What's more to say? If you remove fat cells, where's the excess caloric intake gonna go? I think you just had liposuction and don't want to admit it was for vanity and may harm your health in the future. You think the MDs care it harms your health in the future? No, that gives them a job.
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    Oct 12, 2012 5:34 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells?
    Did you know that rats are not people?

    Liposuction is great for previously-obese people who have unattached fat hanging in a bag of loose skin around their waistline.

    Maybe they should make mice obese and see how fast they get diabetes.


    Mice who are genetically programmed to not have adipose tissue develop diabetes. Again, where is the sugar gonna go if the muscles are saturated? Where?
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    Oct 12, 2012 12:28 PM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    paulflexes said
    bluey2223 saidI don't see how plastic surgery in terms of liposuction is ethical and legal with research out that fat cells serve a purpose--to store excess energy intake, especially excess glucose through lipogenesis. Did you know that rats develop diabetes faster with fewer fat cells?
    Did you know that rats are not people?

    Liposuction is great for previously-obese people who have unattached fat hanging in a bag of loose skin around their waistline.

    Maybe they should make mice obese and see how fast they get diabetes.


    Mice who are genetically programmed to not have adipose tissue develop diabetes. Again, where is the sugar gonna go if the muscles are saturated? Where?
    That could have more to do with the genetic alteration than the lack of fat.