Brits, Aussies, Kiwis: "To go postal"

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    Oct 09, 2012 5:29 PM GMT
    Meaning to go berserk. I presume the Canadians use the expression. But do the Brits, Aussies, kiwis, etc use that expression?

    I presume to go postal has an American origin cuz our postal workers go berserk and we have the guns.
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    Oct 09, 2012 5:31 PM GMT
    I imagine they don't since the expression originates from the USPS incidents.

    Although they might be aware of the expression now thanks to the infiltration of American media. Whether or not they actually use it is up for debate.
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    Oct 09, 2012 5:34 PM GMT
    I was reading the freedom of speech thread, which is about a university in England. One of the commenters used the expression. But I can't tell where he is from. That's what made me wonder.
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    Oct 09, 2012 5:40 PM GMT
    I found the post you're referring to. Well, the person is clearly not American because he doesn't use American spelling. He very well could be Canadian or perhaps "to go postal" has caught on across the pond with some people.
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    Oct 09, 2012 5:43 PM GMT
    Or he very well could be an American expat in the UK who has gotten used to British spelling?

    I'm more inclined to say that it's an Americanism that has found its place in British English.
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    Oct 09, 2012 7:43 PM GMT
    Wasn't there an Umberto Eco novel in which the European posts are collectively fingered as being a tool of organized crime and/or the secret societies that really run the world? With some loose historical justification that I'm not bored enough to look up right now. The US stuff is small time...
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    Oct 09, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    To go postal or not to go postal. That is the question.

    The answer is to go postal, because it's fun! icon_twisted.gif
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    Oct 09, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    Caslon21000 saidI presume to go postal has an American origin cuz our postal workers go berserk and we have the guns.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Going_postal
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    Oct 09, 2012 7:53 PM GMT
    I wonder how many more responses this thread can garner and still not answer the question.
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    Oct 09, 2012 8:19 PM GMT
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/language/uptodate/2010/11/101102_kyeutd_go_postal_page.shtml

    This simply acknowledges that the expression exists in the UK nowadays. I don't know about Ireland, South Africa, Australia, or New Zealand. I imagine they follow the British trends, although Oz and Kiwiland certainly go their own ways too.
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    Oct 09, 2012 8:24 PM GMT
    I was just expecting a Brit etc to answer. I can wait.
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    Oct 09, 2012 8:56 PM GMT
    I have never heard this phrase and i was born and raised in england
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    Oct 09, 2012 8:59 PM GMT
    karson saidI have never heard this phrase and i was born and raised in england

    Thank you.

    Lets see if any other Brits come on...or Aussies and Kiwis
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    Oct 09, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    I ate a Kiwi yesterday.
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    Oct 09, 2012 9:11 PM GMT
    I have never heard it, in the UK, in the US or in Canada, which is quite reassuring I suppose.
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    Oct 09, 2012 9:11 PM GMT
    I have never heard the term used here (only on US TV shows) but we certainly use berserk.
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    Oct 09, 2012 9:12 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidI have never heard it, in the UK, in the US or in Canada, which is quite reassuring I suppose.

    Oh wow. Two Brits who haven't heard it.

    ...and an Aussie.
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    Oct 09, 2012 9:16 PM GMT
    The USPS does certainly have a reputation internationally for crazy behaviour.
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    Oct 09, 2012 10:11 PM GMT
    ozgreenguy saidThe USPS does certainly have a reputation internationally for crazy behaviour.
    Shooting a Messican in the midst of a wildfire rampage with an AK-47 doesn't imply internationally crazy behavior. icon_razz.gif
  • Fable

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    Oct 09, 2012 11:04 PM GMT
    yeah we're aware of the term over here. not really in use, but most people could implement it in a sentence accurately. wasn't aware of the origins of the term until now though. interesting.
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    Oct 10, 2012 1:44 AM GMT
    Aussies or Kiwis don't use it in their colloquial language; that I know that much icon_wink.gif
  • RollDontWalk

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    Oct 10, 2012 2:22 AM GMT
    I grew up in Australia and had only ever heard it in American media.

    I guess our equivalent is to "crack the shits"

    like this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihd7ofrwQX0
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    Oct 10, 2012 4:13 AM GMT
    No we do not use it at all.

    we hear it in tv shows and movies. But we don't use it.

    We also don't throw shrimp on the barby!

  • RollDontWalk

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    Oct 10, 2012 5:18 AM GMT
    Yeah we don't even call it shrimp anyway, they're prawns. "Shrimp" was just so that the ads would be comprehensible to Americans...
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    Oct 10, 2012 5:37 AM GMT
    As a Brit, I can say I have never heard the expression until now!