Does anyone really know what is happening in Spain?

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    Oct 09, 2012 6:19 PM GMT
    The US doesn't seem to cover foreign problems too much. I don't quite understand the whole situation but I'll be traveling to Spain next year. I heard for the young, unemployment is 50 percent from one source.
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    Oct 09, 2012 6:27 PM GMT
    This means you can buy them for fie dolla.
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    Oct 09, 2012 9:08 PM GMT
    braddomo saidThe US doesn't seem to cover foreign problems too much. I don't quite understand the whole situation but I'll be traveling to Spain next year. I heard for the young, unemployment is 50 percent from one source.


    Unemployment has always been high in Spain. Pretty much since the end of Franco's dictatorship, Spain has had the highest rate of unemployment in all of Europe. It's simply escalated over the last few years with the global recession. The unemployment rate has fluctuated between 20%-24% during the recession.

    It's true that people from the age group 18-30 are the most affected. Roughly half of them are unemployed. In regions such as Canary Islands, Extremadura, Andalucía, Ceuta, and Melilla, some rates are even close to 60% unemployed! There's already been a mass exodus of young people going to Germany, Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina to find work.
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    Oct 10, 2012 12:42 AM GMT
    Spain is the 4 biggest economic power in Europe it exerts a lot of influence within the European community. The main problem was that they bought into the real estate boom and speculation, just like the USA also affected Spain in the same way, and the of course the collapse of that. This in terms has crippled the government in terms of revenues and able to pay its external debt and hence the high rate of unemployment.

    Therefore, the European Union is worried that if Spain continues to bleed so to speak it will spill over to other economies in the Euro-Zone compounding the problem of a European recovering. This is why you see more austerity measures from the Spanish government trying to curtail expenses, since they are being pressured by EU to straighten their belts before a bailout or more loans are given to them.

    Germany is the big player since they are the most solvent and richest economy in Europe with all its sicily siblings around them, and they are being pressured to help more with the bail-out.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Oct 10, 2012 12:44 AM GMT
    My sister and her boyfriend are living there. I could ask her any questions you've got if you want.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Oct 10, 2012 1:08 AM GMT
    Austerity is taking a heavy toll. Besides astronomical unemployment, a lot of formerly middle class spaniards are hunting for food. There was a story on the BBC a few nights ago about people in Madrid going out at night to scrounge restaurant and supermarket garbage bins to get food for the day. And there is renewed pressure to allow Catalonia to secede from Spain and become independent. (No bombings yet.)

    A lot of public stations in the US carry the BBC news. They often cover events and the situation in Spain.
    There is also the BBC news website (which is a bit disorganized).:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world/europe/

    There is also Google news UK, which has a lot more news about europe than the regular news sites:
    http://news.google.co.uk/
    and the Guardian website:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world

    I don't think you can buy sex as cheaply as Paul does, but there is probably a lot more availability of sex for hire than in recent years.


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    Oct 10, 2012 2:47 AM GMT
    It's bad enough that young Spaniards often live with their parents until their 30's or until they get married. And that was before things went to shits recently. Never gonna leave home now!
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    Oct 10, 2012 2:51 AM GMT
    ssssvo8.gif
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    Oct 10, 2012 2:59 AM GMT
    It rained.
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    Oct 10, 2012 3:02 AM GMT
    JackBlair69 saidThe US covers it plenty. The people YOU associate with are brain-dead - that's the problem.

    Spain is on a toxic-asset buying spree, counting on a bailout from the EU when it all goes to complete shit. The place sucks. People are leaving.

    privateryanpie.gif
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    Oct 10, 2012 3:03 AM GMT
    JR_RJ said
    JackBlair69 saidThe US covers it plenty. The people YOU associate with are brain-dead - that's the problem.

    Spain is on a toxic-asset buying spree, counting on a bailout from the EU when it all goes to complete shit. The place sucks. People are leaving.

    privateryanpie.gif


    The future scene of Cataluña and Euskadi/Basque Country by the end of this year.
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    Oct 10, 2012 3:55 AM GMT
    Kinda sucks when you think about it. The Catholic Church no longer has much of a hold on Spanish society. Being gay is cool and you can marry your same-sex partner. Yet you can't find a job to pay for your big gay wedding icon_cry.gif
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    Oct 10, 2012 9:28 AM GMT
    yeah the economy is not pretty over there especially for young people. Basically the same thing happened there as in the US, people borrowed too much for their own good and now they have to pay.

    On another note I think it is crazy that historically one of the most Catholic religious-repressive countries in the world are one of the most open to gay people. I believe much more so than in the US. How this came about someone has to explain to me.
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    Oct 10, 2012 3:43 PM GMT
    calique saidyeah the economy is not pretty over there especially for young people. Basically the same thing happened there as in the US, people borrowed too much for their own good and now they have to pay.

    On another note I think it is crazy that historically one of the most Catholic religious-repressive countries in the world are one of the most open to gay people. I believe much more so than in the US. How this came about someone has to explain to me.



    I think a lot of Spanish people turned away from the Catholic Church because of Francisco Franco. He was a bit of a religious fanatic and gave the Church a lot of power during his dictatorship. Catholicism was the only valid religion in Spain during his years. He died, the monarchy was restored, and then Movida Madrileña began in the '80s to counteract all the conservative values from the Franco years. Only since the '80s have people of other religions, particularly Jews and Muslims, been allowed to establish places of worship again. Overall, I'd say a lot of people these days, especially younger people, simply feel it's not necessary to follow the Church's word exactly. Many also claim to be spiritual but not religious, and of course, non-religious people have become more numerous.
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    Oct 10, 2012 4:10 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidThis means you can buy them for fie dolla.



    What can I get for Ten Dolla?
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    Oct 10, 2012 4:58 PM GMT
    Catalonian secessionists are vying to become an independent state.
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    Oct 10, 2012 9:12 PM GMT
    nicodegallo said
    calique saidyeah the economy is not pretty over there especially for young people. Basically the same thing happened there as in the US, people borrowed too much for their own good and now they have to pay.

    On another note I think it is crazy that historically one of the most Catholic religious-repressive countries in the world are one of the most open to gay people. I believe much more so than in the US. How this came about someone has to explain to me.



    I think a lot of Spanish people turned away from the Catholic Church because of Francisco Franco. He was a bit of a religious fanatic and gave the Church a lot of power during his dictatorship. Catholicism was the only valid religion in Spain during his years. He died, the monarchy was restored, and then Movida Madrileña began in the '80s to counteract all the conservative values from the Franco years. Only since the '80s have people of other religions, particularly Jews and Muslims, been allowed to establish places of worship again. Overall, I'd say a lot of people these days, especially younger people, simply feel it's not necessary to follow the Church's word exactly. Many also claim to be spiritual but not religious, and of course, non-religious people have become more numerous.


    thanks for the explanation. I guess that makes sense. Yeah in terms of being non religious Europe is way ahead than the US.
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    Oct 10, 2012 9:28 PM GMT
    I'm in Spain, and while I'm no expert, it's true that unemployment is getting to 25%, I don't know what it is for the younger, but it seems "impossible" almost to find a job for them. Prospects are very different than in the US, where it's easy to move out, find an apartment, job, and pay for it.

    A month ago or so there was a NYT report with photos of Madrid bums and what not... that portrayal is INNACURATE. There's no rampant poverty, people don't have to beg, etc (and definitely not anymore than in cities like Chicago). Madrid is very clean and festive, Spaniards are very laid back, you can't tell by any people that there's a crisis.

    One way you can tell that there is a crisis, though, is by frequent strikes, which are for the most part peaceful, but disrupt local travel and sometimes do end up in violence. People are just fed up with the government.
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    Oct 10, 2012 9:32 PM GMT
    calique said
    nicodegallo said
    calique saidyeah the economy is not pretty over there especially for young people. Basically the same thing happened there as in the US, people borrowed too much for their own good and now they have to pay.

    On another note I think it is crazy that historically one of the most Catholic religious-repressive countries in the world are one of the most open to gay people. I believe much more so than in the US. How this came about someone has to explain to me.



    I think a lot of Spanish people turned away from the Catholic Church because of Francisco Franco. He was a bit of a religious fanatic and gave the Church a lot of power during his dictatorship. Catholicism was the only valid religion in Spain during his years. He died, the monarchy was restored, and then Movida Madrileña began in the '80s to counteract all the conservative values from the Franco years. Only since the '80s have people of other religions, particularly Jews and Muslims, been allowed to establish places of worship again. Overall, I'd say a lot of people these days, especially younger people, simply feel it's not necessary to follow the Church's word exactly. Many also claim to be spiritual but not religious, and of course, non-religious people have become more numerous.


    thanks for the explanation. I guess that makes sense. Yeah in terms of being non religious Europe is way ahead than the US.


    Western and Central Europe anyway. Religion has only increased in Eastern Europe since the end of communism. The religious fanatics there can give American Bible thumpers a run for the money.
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    Oct 10, 2012 9:42 PM GMT
    Youth unemployment in the US is high too, but I don't think the situation is quite as grave as it is in Spain.

    The American situation seems to be that a lot of university-educated youngsters lack relevant work experience to start a career while being overqualified for everything below that. Many end up taking jobs in fields they didn't study or didn't originally plan to enter (e.g. retail, admin). I think some tend to worry that they're going to remain stuck with little progress.

    Meanwhile in Spain, young people are having a tough time finding a job of any kind regardless of their background and education. That's why a lot of them are fleeing to other countries in hopes of landing something. CNN did a special last year on the situation in Spain where countries like Brazil, Germany, and Mexico have reported significant influxes of Spanish citizens immigrating for work over the past 3 years.

    As for the possibility of Catalunya's secession, well, it depends. There are some very loud voices for Catalunya's independence. However, I can't help but think that the majority of Catalan residents are still indifferent or not crazy about the idea. While the region's cultural identity has always been a key issue, Catalunya is probably the most culturally diverse region in Spain because it has the most immigrants and many people from other parts of Spain who haven't quite assimilated to Catalan culture. Now even Catalunya is starting to feel the strains of the failing economy because the region's rate of unemployment has increased recently. Who knows what's going to happen?
  • worley

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    Oct 10, 2012 10:29 PM GMT
    I currently live in Barcelona, and I travel frequently to Madrid for work. I lived in the US between 2006 and 2010.

    If you want to come to Spain as a tourist, you will find a vibrant, exciting society, eager to have fun and enjoy life. No signs of recession whatsoever. I am in Madrid for the night and I had to call five different restaurants to finally get a table for two. On a Wednesday. Everyone is out on the streets no matter what.

    If you, instead, plan to move to Spain, not a good idea. The economy is getting worse by the minute, unemployment is rising and prospects are it's going to get even worse. Same thing for Italy, France...

    Regarding Catalonia, I used to be indifferent about the independence issue, two years ago. Now I think it's the only solution. Spain is dragging Catalonia down and the overall result would be better if them both were separate.