Does it make sense to buy a new notebook before Windows 8?

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    Oct 13, 2012 10:31 PM GMT
    I'm wondering if Windows 8 will be like Vista where a lot of people hated it but then many of the issues were fixed when Windows 7 was released? Maybe it makes sense to get a notebook with Windows 7 and see if Windows 8 is any good - I think I could install Windows 8 easily enough.

    To maybe I should just get a Mac? icon_lol.gif

    I dunno, sometimes technology seems so overwhelming with too many choices. Hope some of you tech guys can share some insight.
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    Oct 13, 2012 10:45 PM GMT
    I'm sure a majority of guys here will tell you to get a Mac. Not much has changed with OSX in the past 10 years. It's like the Windows XP of Mac. No radical changes in the user interface, pretty stable, and subtle features/updates have been implemented over the years.

    But if you prefer to use Windows, I suggest you get a computer now. Windows 8 notebooks and desktops are starting to roll out. I heard Best Buy already has floor units that you can play with. If you get a computer with Windows 7 now, you're eligible for either a free or low cost upgrade to Windows 8. The offer varies amongst different brands so read the fine print.

    So you can just buy the low cost upgrade, and set it aside. Then continue to use Windows 7 until you feel the need to upgrade to Windows 8. Or you can install the upgrade. If you don't like Windows 8, then use the computer's recovery disc to restore it back to Windows 7.
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    Oct 13, 2012 10:51 PM GMT
    xrichx saidSo you can just buy the low cost upgrade, and set it aside. Then continue to use Windows 7 until you feel the need to upgrade to Windows 8. Or you can install the upgrade. If you don't like Windows 8, then use the computer's recovery disc to restore it back to Windows 7.


    Yeah. That's what I was thinking of.

    I was playing with the idea of getting a Mac because I have the iPhone and Ipad and it would be cool to have all three work together seamlessly but teh price premium Apple charges for the notebooks is pretty steep. I'm trying to figure out if it's really THAT much better to justify it.
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    Oct 13, 2012 11:07 PM GMT
    If you really want a Mac but don't want to pay the premium, you might want to consider a refurbished unit. They might have a few scratches but they come with a 1 year warranty. And I believe you can also buy Apple Care on top of that.
    http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/specialdeals/mac
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    Oct 13, 2012 11:55 PM GMT
    sashaman said
    xrichx saidSo you can just buy the low cost upgrade, and set it aside. Then continue to use Windows 7 until you feel the need to upgrade to Windows 8. Or you can install the upgrade. If you don't like Windows 8, then use the computer's recovery disc to restore it back to Windows 7.


    Yeah. That's what I was thinking of.

    I was playing with the idea of getting a Mac because I have the iPhone and Ipad and it would be cool to have all three work together seamlessly but teh price premium Apple charges for the notebooks is pretty steep. I'm trying to figure out if it's really THAT much better to justify it.


    Dude, I'm in your situation too. I wonder, if I should buy a MacBook or a Windows laptop. I opened a thread about this topic. If you're interested, you can read it.

    I think, it make sense. As xrichx said, you can upgrade it later to Windows 8. Just wait and read the reviews about the new Windows system. After releasing their first version, they often had technical problems in the security sector.
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    Oct 14, 2012 7:35 AM GMT
    NO! ,unless they have this prepackage or preorder that comes with a discount and that is O K with you icon_biggrin.gif

    *Well darling I don't think its a rush for you to do so, but I do sense Its NOT going to be like Windows XP or Windows 7. Cause there is one thing that Microsoft is changing! Its the I/O interaction with mainstream, the desktop platform to a touchy screen era
    (* icon_rolleyes.gif that's where you will see more smudge ever in your life), yet that said Windows 8 seems to bring a wave of more touch screen User Interface devices,and thats the fun thing with 8! just getting all touchy just to show how well incorporated they can be then the "Posh people" brand!

    They are like incorporating this move or release to ignite and reboot up their So-so lame! Windows Mobile platform to a wider scope where Apple made it collaborating all their devices into one masterpiece of gadgets, but it got pretty sad how they concept it.

    So this approach for Microsoft would actually be a great start for them but still uncertain knowing they could actually wipe-out Android as well, leaving a clean fight in the tech world just Windows and Mac.

    I could actually see the daylight for Windows going all the way as long they keep it like XP or 7 they will definitely do good. & probably getting their interface a tad notch higher then Apple's will be so much more classier.icon_wink.gif
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    Oct 14, 2012 6:20 PM GMT
    So after sleeping on it, I have a plan. My current notebook still works. It's just starting to get slow enough and old enough that it annoys me at times. Since there isn't a reason I HAVE to get something to replace it right away, I think I'll see what the feedback on Windows 8 is. If it's decent, I'll just stick with Windows. If the consensus is that it blows, I'll take it as a sign that it's time to make the switch to Mac. icon_cool.gif
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    Oct 14, 2012 6:51 PM GMT
    As an IT guy I can tell you I have no plans to implement Windows 8 on my network, and I haven't heard a single other IT person in my circles say they plan to either. I think Windows 8 is going to turn out to be Microsoft's biggest dud ever.

    That said, I really like Windows 7. If it were me, I would maybe look at keeping your old laptop (depending on how old it is and what it's resources are - RAM, proc, and drive space) and do a clean install of Windows 7 64-bit.
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    Oct 14, 2012 6:54 PM GMT
    Hey, a lot of Windows 7 laptops are on clearance or are going to be going on clearance, so it might be a good idea to scoop one up. Just make sure it has a good processor.
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    Oct 14, 2012 6:58 PM GMT
    I was thinking about getting a new laptop for school, but I've decided to hold off as well. It didn't really have anything to do with Windows 8 because I haven't seen anything compelling enough about that to make me want to upgrade. I'd prefer a Mac for my personal laptop, but getting one powerful enough to run what I needed became prohibitively expensive.

    Holding off sounds like a good idea, based on what you're saying.
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    Oct 14, 2012 8:39 PM GMT
    Global_Citizen saidAs an IT guy I can tell you I have no plans to implement Windows 8 on my network, and I haven't heard a single other IT person in my circles say they plan to either. I think Windows 8 is going to turn out to be Microsoft's biggest dud ever.

    That said, I really like Windows 7. If it were me, I would maybe look at keeping your old laptop (depending on how old it is and what it's resources are - RAM, proc, and drive space) and do a clean install of Windows 7 64-bit.


    Seems like IT guys say that with every version of Windows that comes out. Just wait until your CEO, CTO, CIO, or whoever wants in installed on their machine. icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 14, 2012 8:41 PM GMT
    SoloXCRacer saidSeems like IT guys say that with every version of Windows that comes out. Just wait until your CEO, CTO, CIO, or whoever wants in installed on their machine. icon_smile.gif

    Upgrading the OS for an entire organization is a pain in the ass and expensive. I don't know any group that upgrades Windows when a new version comes out. It's not worth it.
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    Oct 14, 2012 10:13 PM GMT
    SoloXCRacer said
    Global_Citizen saidAs an IT guy I can tell you I have no plans to implement Windows 8 on my network, and I haven't heard a single other IT person in my circles say they plan to either. I think Windows 8 is going to turn out to be Microsoft's biggest dud ever.

    That said, I really like Windows 7. If it were me, I would maybe look at keeping your old laptop (depending on how old it is and what it's resources are - RAM, proc, and drive space) and do a clean install of Windows 7 64-bit.


    Seems like IT guys say that with every version of Windows that comes out. Just wait until your CEO, CTO, CIO, or whoever wants in installed on their machine. icon_smile.gif


    Not true here. I thought XP was a huge leap forward and ushered it in at the company I was with at the time. Conversely, I did not recommend Vista, but was eager to implement 7.

    My CEO trusts my judgment and takes my advice, so guess what he's using currently?
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    Oct 14, 2012 10:37 PM GMT
    Relax guys, I know all this. Except for the one CxO that wants it on his PC. It doesn't mean it gets rolled out to the entire organization.
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    Oct 14, 2012 10:47 PM GMT
    I've noticed that with Windows - mainly recently - that you get a new OS every other one. Like XP, skip Vista and go with 7.

    if I were you, I'd just get 7. It's a known OS that works quite well.
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    Oct 14, 2012 10:55 PM GMT
    If you wait and get windows 8, you'll be buying into Micosoft's bug test program hahaha.

    Sounds like you just want something "new and shiny"

    It's like buying a car or a plane... What are your needs, and what will fulfill the task?

    Simple?
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    Oct 14, 2012 10:57 PM GMT
    Hah, it seems like noone on here has used Windows 8, so they are talking out of....well.....someplace besides personal experience.
    Windows 8 is amazing! Granted, I am tech savvy, and it took a little getting used to, but the interface, once acclimated, was impressive and snappy....
    Macs, while being great for design and media stuff, spend too much time being nice for my taste.....And aren't as customizable as Windows OS computers....most IT guys I know with Macs have them partitioned for Windows....hah.
    So here's to Windows 8, get it and love it.
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    Oct 14, 2012 11:06 PM GMT
    sashaman saidSo after sleeping on it, I have a plan. My current notebook still works. It's just starting to get slow enough and old enough that it annoys me at times. Since there isn't a reason I HAVE to get something to replace it right away, I think I'll see what the feedback on Windows 8 is. If it's decent, I'll just stick with Windows. If the consensus is that it blows, I'll take it as a sign that it's time to make the switch to Mac. icon_cool.gif


    b r a v o ! icon_wink.gif shall you be bless with peace and harmony! * Arigoto gonsaimzu.
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    Oct 15, 2012 12:00 AM GMT
    brentf88 saidHah, it seems like noone on here has used Windows 8, so they are talking out of....well.....someplace besides personal experience.
    Windows 8 is amazing! Granted, I am tech savvy, and it took a little getting used to, but the interface, once acclimated, was impressive and snappy....


    It seems like you might be a little more experienced with Windows 8 than anyone here, so please tell us about your experience. When did you start using it? What, in your opinion, makes it so amazing?

    I've been using an evaluation copy since early July on a single workstation. So obviously I haven't been able to test it as extensively as I have XP and 7, which I have deployed on an Active Directory domain across 13 locations and 300 nodes. Do you think Win8 would scale to that kind of enterprise environment?
  • NerdLifter

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    Oct 15, 2012 3:13 AM GMT
    Global_Citizen said
    brentf88 saidHah, it seems like noone on here has used Windows 8, so they are talking out of....well.....someplace besides personal experience.
    Windows 8 is amazing! Granted, I am tech savvy, and it took a little getting used to, but the interface, once acclimated, was impressive and snappy....
    It seems like you might be a little more experienced with Windows 8 than anyone here, so please tell us about your experience. When did you start using it? What, in your opinion, makes it so amazing?

    I've been using an evaluation copy since early July on a single workstation. So obviously I haven't been able to test it as extensively as I have XP and 7, which I have deployed on an Active Directory domain across 13 locations and 300 nodes. Do you think Win8 would scale to that kind of enterprise environment?

    I started using Windows 8 since they released the Developer Preview last September and upgrading with each iterative release. It definitely takes significant readjustment with the new start menu and how to search for programs and administrative functions. After you get used to it and learn the new functions, you notice it is far more responsive and efficient at locating programs and displaying information than its predecessors. But you have to be willing to re-adjust to the interface.

    The start menu's function, finding programs and files, has not fundamentally changed; the only difference is now it fills the screen with Metro apps. Just start typing with the start menu up and it will start searching the same way Windows 7 does. You will notice when using it that the interface is far more efficient both in its search indexing and in how it presents the corresponding information.

    Personally, after having become used to it, I am not sure I want to go back to Windows 7. It is especially nice if you have multiple monitors due to the ease of the drag and drop Metro functionality plus app snapping.

    Nevertheless, I am certain many people are going to be jarred by the disruptive change in interface.
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    Oct 15, 2012 4:07 AM GMT
    I personally don't use the Start menu anymore in Windows 7. It's just a lot easier to hit Start and type the program I want to launch. My keyboard also has programmable keys that I've assigned to launch programs I use frequently.

    But yeah, with every new change to the user interface, you're gonna get a lot of push back and belly aching from users. But they'll get over it in time. Remember when ribbons were introduced in Office? That caused a big uproar for a few months. Then no one cared because the more people used it, the more it made sense.
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    Oct 15, 2012 4:21 AM GMT
    xrichx saidI personally don't use the Start menu anymore in Windows 7. It's just a lot easier to hit Start and type the program I want to launch.


    You'll dig Windows 8 then. Learning the short cut keys makes opening apps and finding files so much easier. Better than the old start menu. Example: WindowsButton + Q. Type in the name of the app. The intellisense is really smart and you only have to type in a partial name. Hit enter and the app starts up. Literally less than a second. Same thing for files. The search is extremely fast. Partial file names work as well. A few seconds max.
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    Oct 15, 2012 6:20 AM GMT
    SoloXCRacer said
    You'll dig Windows 8 then. Learning the short cut keys makes opening apps and finding files so much easier. Better than the old start menu. Example: WindowsButton + Q. Type in the name of the app. The intellisense is really smart and you only have to type in a partial name. Hit enter and the app starts up. Literally less than a second. Same thing for files. The search is extremely fast. Partial file names work as well. A few seconds max.
    I'm planning on buying a Windows 8 x86 tablet. For desktop, I think I'll stick with Windows 7 for the time being.
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    Oct 15, 2012 3:08 PM GMT
    Early Windows 8 adopters prefer Windows 7
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    Oct 15, 2012 3:21 PM GMT
    SpiralNotebook.jpg