Republican or Democrat? Make up your mind.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 29, 2008 7:52 PM GMT
    I've seen this way too many times. People say that they are democrat, and just because the person they wanted to "win" doesn't make it.. they switch over to choose someone on the republican side, and vice versa. Make up your mind, already!


    That being said, I'm a democrat. I originally wanted Hilary to win, but since she didn't make it. I went to the Obama side. I like a lot of what he has to say and believe he would be good for our country. If you're democrat, why vote for a republican? And, if you're republican, why vote for a democrat?

    Explain yourselves!
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    Aug 29, 2008 8:18 PM GMT
    Labels suck. You can be a republican and really oppose what a republican candidate believes in and strives for in office. I've known republicans and democrats who voted for the opposite party because they didn't agree with what "their" candidate's views were.
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    Aug 29, 2008 8:53 PM GMT
    I don't agree with the Democrats on 100% of the issues and have voted for Republicans before who offered a compelling platform. So, I don't see it as an either/or situation.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Aug 29, 2008 9:20 PM GMT
    I've been political from an early age. I have followed politics from junior high, though looking back I had only a superficial understanding of the issues. Which is why I was a Republican. I fell for the Ronald Reagan Kool Aid. That said, our country was in a malaise, and then-President Carter was too much of a micro-manager to get us out. Reagan spoke with lofty ideas, that felt good at the time.

    My family was always more socially-moderate, so I didn't really identify with that part of the Republican agenda, but I could understand fiscal conservatism. When I was finally able to vote, I still considered myself a Republican, but felt that I would vote for the right person. In those early years, most of my votes went to moderate Republicans. I remember one Republican candidate, I think he was up for a state representative post, gave me a bad feeling. All his literature had him with pictures of Reagan, and Bush Sr., and other prominent Republicans. There was little meat to his materials. I voted for a Democrat, someone who'd never held office, over that Republican. The Republican won, but a couple of years later had to step down over sexual harassment claims. Ultimately, my bad feeling was proven right.

    I went off to college in the late 80s. I voted George H. W. Bush into office, but was uneasy about it. I wish Dukakis had been a better candidate. I felt Bush would skew much more moderate that Reagan. I suppose he was an improvement, but not enough.

    What finally did it was Gov. Pete Wilson, a moderate Republican mayor of San Diego, who became much more conservative after he was elected governor. Though he'd previously indicated an openess to supporting workplace and housing protections for lgbt, he vetoed several measures. I was disgusted. Moderates in the Republican party were dead. The party had sold its soul to the Religious Right. I'm pretty sure Wilson was the last Republican I voted for.

    I'm open to voting for a Republican in the future. I did not vote for Arnold Schwarzenegger as governor, I wasn't living in California at the time when he was up for election. If Wilson had been the kind of Republican Arnold is, perhaps I would have stayed in the party a bit longer. That said, I doubt I'll be voting for Arnold when he's up for reelection.

    The Republicans have to throw off the Religious Right if it ever wants to get my vote in the future. And, needless to say, they have been a complete failure at fiscal conservatism, too.
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    Aug 29, 2008 9:26 PM GMT
    I became aware of politics around the time of the 1968 Democratic convention. My mother's best friend was a Humphrey delegate.

    Republicans since that time have been all about inciting divisions, polarizing people, culture wars, and deriving votes from hatreds of all kinds. I don't think I could even vote for one if I agreed with him or her, simply because it would be not just a vote for the representative, but a vote for putting that party in charge of the House, or the White House with all its attendant departments.

    These are not people to be trusted with government ever.
  • MuslDrew

    Posts: 463

    Aug 29, 2008 10:08 PM GMT
    I was a social liberal-fiscal conservative who leaned towards the Democrats most of the time. I registerd as a Democrat this primary season and voted for Hillary. I'm very supportive of Obama. I doubt I'll vote for any Republican at any level in the near future. Our previous state administration was mostly, if not all, Republican and was plagued with a great deal of corruption and deception. Only one Republican survived the last election and she has been great. The corruption of the fiscal conservatives coupled with the hypocrisy of so many prominent social conservatives has left me with little trust or confidence in the Republican party nationwide.
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    Aug 29, 2008 11:32 PM GMT
    Lilman, I do hope you appreciate the irony of your post.
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    Aug 29, 2008 11:51 PM GMT
    Although I lean heavily democratic and support some socialist ideals (healthcare, education, etc) I am not a party loyalist. There are dems who are more conservative than some republicans. I will usually vote for the most liberal candidate, as long as I like them - (I am talking about our two dominate parties). Whoever is more likely to extend gay people equal rights and to protect a womans right to control her own body, who has more passion about the environment...I will vote for. I do look at other issues of concern and decide what is most important over the next few years.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 30, 2008 8:57 AM GMT
    Didn't we all learn from our parents never to discuss religion or politics? LOL

    I'm a republican - and have been ever since I saw first hand all the terrific things Ronald Reagan did for our state (California) in his two terms as our governor.....far too many to list here. Later as president, Reagan did many more amazing things for the whole country. We could use a president like Reagan again right now.
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    Aug 30, 2008 9:10 AM GMT
    I have never voted for Republicans and probably never will.

    I particularly disagree with their religious and social positions, but I also disagree with their position that cutting taxes will solve every problem. Clearly, it doesn't.

    For people who place 'limited to no government' on a pedestal, they sure like to control women, supress minority rights, embrace religious radicialism, and spend borrowed money like a drunken sailor.

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    Aug 30, 2008 3:38 PM GMT
    How anyone can be gay and vote for a party that opposes gay rights in its platform, is beyond me.

    The two parties are not what they were in the beginning.

    My Dad always said, "Republicans care about money, Democrats care about people." When you think it about, that's really very true.
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    Aug 30, 2008 10:40 PM GMT
    I would say that I could probably be a Democrat if I had grown up somewhere else other than the city I am in.

    All I have known are Dem. mayors and majority Dem. on council. We were one of the only cities to be progressive towards gay people. So the gay issue local has been seen as a non-issue now since neither side see it as a problem to grant partner's benefits.

    Yet people are leaving here in droves. The money mismanagement and the outright ignoring of requests to show the money trail has led the city to not trust the government. However with the Repubs in a severe minority and constantly moving to the suburbs with their money, those that are left in the city are left with high property taxes and increasing school taxes. The government continues to build things to distract the voters instead of courting business to bring their jobs here.

    The local Repubs. are so disorganized and filled with corrupt members that it is no surprise that I do not feel either side will run the country effectively in a majority.

    I have a major distrust of both parties and have looked at some other parties and what they stand for.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 30, 2008 11:04 PM GMT
    I'm a registered Democrat, and I will vote democrat in the presidential in the fall. I have on occassion voted for a local republican candidate when I thought they were better qualified to bring new ideas and talent to the job they're running for. There isn't a whole lot of damage that a republican is going to do to gay rights when he's running for the Public Utilities Commission, so on those rare occassions when it was strictly about a local job I've considered the person over the party. When it comes to national elections one has to deeply consider not only the person but the party platforms and where they stand ideologically on things like equal rights, human rights, social equality, health care, fiscal responsibility, international relations and whole host of other issues. When the major issues of the day are on the line there is only one party that currently makes sense, and that is the democratic party. But there you have the answer as to why once in a blue moon I might vote for a republican as outrageous as the thought is. If you seen some of the clowns that run for office in South Dakota you would understand why once in a great while the lesser of two evils might not be a democrat.