TENNIS ELBOW

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    Oct 15, 2012 5:51 PM GMT
    My doctor suggested physiotherapy
    A trainer who works with injured athletes suggested a week or so of rest and no physiotherapy which might exacerbate the inflamed tendon

    Any experience with either total rest or physiotherapy?
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    Oct 15, 2012 7:28 PM GMT
    Lateral epicondylitis, and yes, rest and ice help greatly, however, a visit or two to a physical therapist would probably be smart. They can diagnose and see how severe it is, provide useful stretches and treatment advice.

    they can also do ultrasounds, electrical stimulation, and possibly iontophoresis- depending on circumstances. (i was a PT aide for 2 years).

    Hope you get better soon.
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    Oct 15, 2012 7:32 PM GMT
    Did you get it playing tennis? Or doing something else?
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    Oct 15, 2012 7:35 PM GMT
    Currrently suffering the same, not sure just a week of rest will do it. I am too busy to sort a physio session myself but my friends wife is one and she told me a few exercises to do. So far, 6 weeks in, I have figured out which exercises kick it off and which don't so I am using my own programme but the pain is still there at times, hopefully it will diminish, if not, I will relent and head to the Docs/physio!
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    Oct 15, 2012 7:48 PM GMT

    Have played tennis for many years and have suffered from tennis elbow. I went through physical therapy treatments to increase my range-of-motion. Also I wore a counterforce brace which really helped! Other than that ice, anti-inflammatory, and rest helps.
  • unicoman1

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    Oct 15, 2012 7:50 PM GMT
    Wow that's so funny I was just looking into that.... having some issues with mine. Hurts like a MOFU when I bang it!
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    Oct 15, 2012 8:38 PM GMT
    I've had tennis elbow for a long time and haven't played tennis in years. It comes and goes and I'm convinced I'll never get rid of it. Rest is the best thing but it's tough to do if you like to work out or be active.
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    Oct 15, 2012 8:41 PM GMT
    Anyone tried one of these things?

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/25/phys-ed-an-easy-fix-for-tennis-elbow/
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    Oct 15, 2012 9:41 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the tips
    A friend of mine, a woman gym rat suggested 2 minutes ice, 3 minutes heat repeated 4 times for 20 minutes a few times a day
    Very frustrating as gym is my time to decompress
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    Oct 15, 2012 10:07 PM GMT
    JSB7742 saidDid you get it playing tennis? Or doing something else?


    I don't play tennis but I have had in the past tennis elbow from working out in the gym
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    Oct 15, 2012 10:40 PM GMT
    Sam54 said
    JSB7742 saidDid you get it playing tennis? Or doing something else?


    I don't play tennis but I have had in the past tennis elbow from working out in the gym


    I agree with the ice/heat/anti-inflammatory approach. Also try eliminating any exercise you do at the gym that involves twisting your wrist. You get tennis elbow when the tendons roll over your bones. For tennis players, it usually means you have bad form on a particular shot (usually the backhand), which is why you never see pros with tennis elbow. The good news is you can get rid of it for good if you figure out what's causing it and correct the problem, in addition to treating it.
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    Oct 16, 2012 1:48 AM GMT
    Although I'd do 15 min ice and 15 min heat with ibuprofen.
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    Oct 17, 2012 1:16 AM GMT
    I thought tennis elbow meant you used your elbow as a makeshift tennis racket cause you're too poor to buy a real one.
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    Oct 21, 2012 6:54 AM GMT
    That NY Times article on the rubber bar definitely sounds like an interesting prospect.

    Shoulder, elbow, and forearm stretches do wonders.... check out Phil and Jim Wharton's stretch book.

    Also, PT exercises to strengthen the shoulder, maybe with a regular Theraband, could be really good.

    Tai Chi is supposed to be able to help. I think acupuncture could get you healing quickly too.
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    Oct 21, 2012 5:58 PM GMT
    Last year I thought I had tennis elbow but it turned out to be a bone spur. I couldn't see it or feel anything there in the early stage, when it was most painful. Could hardly even lift a glass of water. I'm pretty sure if a doc examined without an xray he'd never have known what it was. Only later did the lump appear. The pain stopped once it stopped growing. Can only see it now when I bend the elbow at about 90 degrees, not when my arm is outstretched nor bent all the way. And now the arm seems to work normally again so I'm just leaving it.
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    Oct 23, 2012 8:14 AM GMT
    Currently recovering from tennis elbow, never knew how sore it could be, the pain when it was really inflamed was quite bad. I had to stop weight training for 3 months, used ice packs, anti-inflammatory meds and had some physio.

    A previous poster was correct to say that you need to figure out what caused it, mine was poor lifting techniques and not allowing my body to recover after workouts. All the warning signs were there but I pushed on through until my body made me stop.

    Hope OP you get yours sorted soon.

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    Oct 23, 2012 9:10 PM GMT
    One of the guys brought a flexbar (recommended above) to tennis last week for everybody to see/try. It's cool. He's using it to treat an injury other than tennis elbow.

    8480008L.jpg

    If the injury is tennis-related, the comment above about backhand technique applies. There are many great instructional videos to review on the 'Net on the right way to hit a backhand, including the proper grip.

    1337-2006_04_19_grip_guide_6(1).jpg

    Some people also recommend using a racquet with a bigger grip, less stiffness, and lowering string tension. I switched to a 5 grip after having tennis elbow.

    It goes without saying that weightlifting and tennis go together, to prevent injuries.

    I've had tennis elbow twice and played through it, using aspirin or ibuprofen, massaging the area, and paying special attention to backhand technique.

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    May 13, 2013 5:04 AM GMT
    I suppose this really depends on your own preference/health/goals, but I'd highly recommend going through with PT. My therapist did wonders for my lateral epicondylitis, and he helped me invest in a long-term solution that really was best for me.