How Exercise-Friendly Is Your Body? A Genetic Test Claims to Tell You

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    Oct 17, 2012 12:40 PM GMT
    http://healthland.time.com/2012/10/11/does-your-body-benefit-from-exercise-you-can-find-out/?iid=hl-article-mostpop1

    Is that daily jog really doing your body any good? A new test purports to tell you whether you’re genetically wired to benefit from exercise — or not so much.

    As the New York Times reports, the genetic test is developed by British company XRGenomics, and is based on the findings of a 2010 study that identified about 30 gene variations that predicted how fit an individual may become through aerobic endurance activity.

    The study’s authors, including researchers from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Louisiana, discovered the gene variations by genotyping muscle tissue of study participants who completed 6 to 20 weeks of endurance training. People’s aerobic fitness levels were gauges by looking at increases in their VO12 max — the body’s ability to circulate oxygen to muscles during exercise.

    Not surprisingly, the results led to an onslaught of requests for a genetic test, so the study’s lead researcher, James Timmons, a professor of systems biology at Loughborough University in England, and his colleagues filed a patent for the gene variants and developed the test. It’s not the first such test on the market: there are others (none of which are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration) that say they can predict whether young, aspiring athletes are better suited to sprinting or long-distance running, for example. But these test focus only on single genes, while XRGenomics’ product, with its analysis of 30 gene variants, is more reliable and scientifically validated, say its developers.

    Curious gym-goers can send the company a cheek swab, and within six weeks they will receive results identifying them as low- or high-responders based on their DNA profile. It’ll cost you, though: the basic test and report run about $318; the price goes up to $478 for a more detailed analysis and personalized exercise recommendations from the company’s experts.
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    Oct 17, 2012 11:32 PM GMT
    I was taught that muscles adjust according to the stresses placed on them,
    or something like the specificity theory?

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    Oct 17, 2012 11:41 PM GMT
    I used to work for a genetic company in Australia and we as staff members all got to do the test for free.

    I found out I was moderate endurance - moderate power meaning I was neither on the genotype profile of being more suited to endurance or power, however just in the middle. Therefore my genes indicated I had a fairly equal proportion of Type I slow twitch and Type II fast twitch muscle fibres.

    I received a printed report detailing what sports suited me best and an endurance and power guide (very general), detailing what % Heart Rate and time I should be training to get the most efficient results.

    To be honest though I personally I wouldn't pay that much just to find out information that really I kind of knew already. icon_razz.gif
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    Oct 17, 2012 11:46 PM GMT
    I already know that my body is designed for endurance, but I'm going to continue doing resistance/hypertrophy training because I don't want to look like a marathon runner.
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    Oct 17, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    bananamilk saidI was taught that muscles adjust according to the stresses placed on them,
    or something like the specificity theory?

    That's correct. However, that "adjustment" will vary based on how much oxygen is circulated through the muscles (VO12 max). Some people simply get very little benefit from exercise. For them, diet makes more difference (I'm one of those).