The Hidden Sodium in Chicken

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    Oct 21, 2012 4:45 PM GMT
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    "About one-third of the fresh chicken found in supermarket meat cases has been synthetically saturated with a mix of water, salt, and other additives via needle injections and high-pressure vacuum tumbling. The process is designed to make naturally lean poultry meat juicier and more tender."

    http://www.cookinglight.com/eating-smart/nutrition-101/sodium-in-chicken-00412000070041
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    Oct 21, 2012 10:02 PM GMT
    Isn't that similar to brining? I don't think a more tender and juicier chicken is a bad thing. It just sucks that you're paying for water, since chicken is sold by weight.
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    Oct 21, 2012 10:15 PM GMT
    Helios69 said"... The process is designed to make naturally lean poultry meat juicier and more tender." heavier, so they can get more $ per pound.
    Fixed.
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    Oct 21, 2012 10:33 PM GMT
    Yep, it's brining - soaking meat in saltwater so that it absorbs more liquid so it cooks juicy every time. Your grandma did it and so did mine. The reason Costco rotisserie chickens are always so plump, meaty and moist is because they aren't just soaked but injected with brine. Since I don't add salt to anything and don't eat much processed food I have a low salt intake so I brine all I want, rinsing before cooking of course.