Credit Card Fraud Charges

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 01, 2008 11:42 PM GMT


    So, I've recently been experiencing a lot of mysterious charges to my credit card a few days ago. While I was checking my Visa account online and saw some charges I didn't make. I decided to research these and they ended up being subcriptions to pornography, and it's not the kind you'd all enjoy either (girls are gross lol).

    After phoning my Visa company about this, the customer representative I was talking to told me that a bunch of transactions were being made that day, and I didn't even touch my card. I flipped the shit out learning that those transactions being made almost totalled $200. I even phoned customer support for each of those porn sites yelling "WHO DID THIS TO ME?!" and ended up cancelling my card immediately.

    I have to admit, I am scared that this kind of shit happens, and I'm pissed that people do this shit too. I do like shopping online though. Is there any type of program that can secure credit cards onlne? A lot of my friends suggested paypals.com, but I wanted to know everyone else's opinion. Is there also another type of program that can protect my computer from possible hijackers?


  • theONLYallan

    Posts: 69

    Sep 02, 2008 12:00 AM GMT
    why freak out?

    it's not like you're responsible for any of these charges..

    these kinds of things happen all the time.
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    Sep 02, 2008 2:53 AM GMT
    I'm with Allan, don't be scared. It's your bank and credit card company's job to protect you from fraud. There's a lot they can do with smart cards and personal identification technology that they just don't use. If they were losing money they'd do something about it. And you're protected by the law. Just relax and go shopping - when your new credit card arrives anyway.

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    Sep 02, 2008 3:07 AM GMT
    The other things you can do:
    -shred any credit card statements.
    -Don't conduct online financial transactions over Wifi - in case someone is piggybacking you and hacks into your laptop. (I know I know sounds implausible and I didn't believe people could do that...until it happened to me back in 2004 and the guy booked a $2200 trip to Vegas on my Discover card!!!)
    -Do not autosave your passwords to financial sites on your home/work computer or laptop. Someone could come along, check your favorites for you bank site and get in with 3 or 4 clicks!
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Sep 02, 2008 3:13 AM GMT
    about 7 or 8 years ago, i had this happen with my debit card, a waiter skimmed it when he took it to the back.
    Mine was about 600, and when i told the bank, the money was immediately back in my account (at least that night or the next day), the card was canceled, and a new one was on it's way.
    thankfully it was in the early days of online banking, I had gone online to check my balance, and discovered it almost immediately instead of when i stated to bounce transactions or the following month when my statement came.
    3 of us at the table paid with cards, and we all got hit.

    I see you're in Canada, so I'm not sure how it works up there, but my bank (Bank of America) has a feature on credit cards called shopsafe, you can get a temporary credit card number, that will only work for one vendor, although you can use it multiple times at that vendor for up to a year.
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    Sep 02, 2008 4:16 AM GMT
    This has happened to me a couple of times in the last year, but I caught it on the same day, before there was much damage.

    One thing that bothers me about firefox is that it seems to save my credit card numbers in some autofill buffer. I type the first couple of numbers and the whole thing spills out. Bad.

    I don't quite understand the scam, though. Most of the charges are about $5, to all kinds of left wing charities. Then there are a few bogus orders of about $50 of merchandise, delivered to a fictional name with a non-existent address within my zip code. The merchandise gets shipped out and returned to the sender. Where does the scammer make money?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 02, 2008 4:38 AM GMT
    z0mg haxxorz are everywhere.
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    Sep 02, 2008 5:03 AM GMT
    I recommend a good security set up if you are going to use your credit card online for any purchases and who doesn't these days. Keep your Operating System up to date with patches, employ a good quality firewall (no windows firewall is not enough imho), employ a good anti-spyware/anti-virus/anti-rootkit/anti-Trojan solution. Avoid storing the number on the computer.
  • Mars

    Posts: 158

    Sep 02, 2008 5:52 AM GMT
    Everyone else on here seems to have a happy ending to report. Thats a good thing for them. I, however don't have such a happy ending to my story. This happened to me aboutn 8 years ago and I was ultimately held responsible for ALL charges.
    I learned that there were disputable charges happening within 24 hours of having used my card at an American Eagle store at my local mall. It seems that the kids who worked there got my number after I had made a purchase there and they were buying grow lights (presumably for their marijuana plants) with my card number online, and the charges showed up on my statement as 'ABC Farm Supplies'. and because, after about 3 months of dealing with my bank on the issue, I could not prove to their satisfaction that I was not the one who made the charges even though I ultimately ended up flat out inviting them to my house to inspect the premisis for any of the merchandise in question, I was held liable for $500 in charges that were not mine.
    And just last year, my dad went to use his debit card at the local grocery store and was declined because, as it turns out, his card number (not his actual card and not hisPIN number) had been used within only minutes in 2 different cities that were from 30 to 400 miles away from where he lives. Though after a 30 day investigation of his claim he was given his money back he was warned that if in fact the bank were not able to catch the guilty party, regardless of proof, he would be held liable for the charges.
    As a small business owners we were also told that if the true perpetrators had not been caught (which is sadly too often the case) we would be the next in line to be held responsible regardless of any precaution we may take. You see, banks do not take this sort of thing lightly and without question, someone WILL be held responsible in the end regardless of true guilt. The banks ALWAYS get their money in the end.
    My point to all this is that in spite of what others have said on this topic, you should deffinately take this very seriously and stick with the investigation as closely as possible to ensure your desired outcome. No matter what they may say, in the end, your bank doesn't really care as much about you as they do their own bottom line. This is a simple fact in the world of business.
    I should add that both experiences that I cited above are with 2 different banks that are not affiliated with each other. Like I said, in today's world, it is simply the way business has to be done. ID theft is all too prevalent and we all need to be VERY diligent.

    Good luck with this, as I know just how much it can really suck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 02, 2008 6:05 AM GMT
    It's why you should never answer emails from ailing Nigerians itching to give you $1M.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 02, 2008 6:42 AM GMT
    Another suggestion is to get yourself a prepaid credit card. It has a set amount that you put on it and if someone happens to steal the number, it wont effect your credit score.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 02, 2008 6:47 AM GMT
    I was recently In Rio de Janiero and to make a long story short.....someone put a drug in my drink. Next thing I knew I woke up the next day in my hotel room and my computer (with EVERYTHING on it). all my money and ALL my credit cards were gone. It was a disaster.

    When I got home, it was a nightmare straightening things out. There were thousands of dollars of unauthorized charges on my cards.

    I've been told by the banks that I will not be responsible for any of those charges. But it is a pain to file the paperwork, cancell all the cards and get new ones.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 02, 2008 7:56 AM GMT
    Hi guys,

    There are many tips to give, and having worked with merchant credit card processing and processors here are just a few:

    Read the credit card agreement, particularly in relation to lost cards and unauthorized charges.

    Use a credit card, not a debit card. They are not the same and don't work the same way.

    The moment that you notice an unusual charge, call the card issuer as instructed and stop using the card in question immediately.

    Turn off autofill in any browser (you can turn it off in firefox too).

    NEVER EVER write your social security number in an e-mail. Additionally, do not write any account numbers in e-mail. Tech guys will know this, but e-mail is a point A to point Z system, not a point A to point B system.

    CROSS-CUT shred everything that has your name, your address, your social security number, or your account number on it. Strip-shredding is not sufficient.

    Do not follow links to online services in e-mail. Type URLs (web addresses) directly into the browser yourself.

    The only thing that you should have installed on your computer is a anti-adware program and an anti-virus program. Your entire network should be behind a router. In other words, your computer should not directly be connected to a modem. Additionally, disable wireless network capabilities if you're not using the wireless features of a router. If you are using wireless features on your network, they must be encrypted.

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    Sep 02, 2008 10:16 AM GMT
    Push for chip and pin, problem solved.
  • Puppy80

    Posts: 451

    Sep 02, 2008 11:27 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidThis has happened to me a couple of times in the last year, but I caught it on the same day, before there was much damage.

    One thing that bothers me about firefox is that it seems to save my credit card numbers in some autofill buffer. I type the first couple of numbers and the whole thing spills out. Bad.

    I don't quite understand the scam, though. Most of the charges are about $5, to all kinds of left wing charities. Then there are a few bogus orders of about $50 of merchandise, delivered to a fictional name with a non-existent address within my zip code. The merchandise gets shipped out and returned to the sender. Where does the scammer make money?


    You have to be really really careful with this one. They usually will just do small charges or card authorazations for a few months to make sure you're not paying attention and the account stays active. Then suddenly they'll hit your account for several hundred dollars. I was hit a few months ago for this online game site for about 80 bucks that I didn't subscribe to. My bank reversed the charge for me. Now I noticed this card authorization for some random place and I searched the phone number on my statement and it said it was some fraud protection place. But to be careful cause like I said they will end up zapping your account.

    Another good thing is to do a identity theft type thing on your credit report with the big 3 services so you know if someone has gotten ahold of your info.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Sep 02, 2008 12:26 PM GMT
    Thanks for writing the thread. Its something that should be discussed and all of us should be reminded how easy it can be to become a victim of fraud.
    I'd have called the card company immediately upon seeing something funny, report it and cancel the card. I hope everyone notices your thread. It can
    cause your credit score great harm.

    I'd even develop a mental "response" to follow if you lose a card, find inappropriate charges or find your identification compromised.
  • Puppy80

    Posts: 451

    Sep 02, 2008 3:12 PM GMT
    Some of the best advice I've heard is to make a scan or photo copy the front and back of everything in your wallet just in case it's lost or stolen. Then you know all your cards and have numbers to call and cancel. Just remember to keep that copy in a safe and secure location icon_smile.gif
  • theONLYallan

    Posts: 69

    Sep 03, 2008 1:37 AM GMT
    Fable saidPush for chip and pin, problem solved.


    i just got my new chip & pin visa infinite (in canada).. icon_biggrin.gif

    i like the idea of keying my pin number in place of a signature.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:50 AM GMT



    Thanks for all the help, I appreciate it. I think after several hours of anxiety and walking in circles, I think I'm slightly calming down. I've never really been frauded or scammed by people I don't know before, well with the exception of that one homeless guy that scammed $20 from me lol, but I don't wanna talk about that.


    I feel a lot more secure knowing that I'm not the one that has to deal with shit like this. I guess it's inevitable, but it's just a matter of dealing with these situations properly. And I suppose it good to be aware that this stuff can happen. And all that advice is definitely gonna take effect too. No more autofill icon_wink.gif


    Haha who knew there was a downfall to using credit cards. This world is a cruel, cruel place...




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:53 AM GMT
    Sedative saidIt's why you should never answer emails from ailing Nigerians itching to give you $1M.




    lol I guess I should start by ignoring those e-mails from ailing Nigerians.