Why does my toilet water outline itself with a brown line?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:08 AM GMT
    Well?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:08 AM GMT
    Feces.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Oct 27, 2012 12:10 AM GMT
    If it's in the toilet tank, it's rust from the metal parts submerged in water.
    If it's in the toilet bowl, uh, maybe you should clean it more often.
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:13 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidIf it's in the toilet tank, it's rust from the metal parts submerged in water.
    If it's in the toilet bowl, uh, maybe you should clean it more often.


    or just plain sewage
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    Oct 27, 2012 12:14 AM GMT
    Most likely impurities in the water supply, brown is usually iron. Mine is red which is from algae, the problem gets worse during warm weather. Contact your council or water company for more advice. Some of my mates have Veolia water and this is a common problem for Veolia customers.
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:15 AM GMT
    A brown line usually indicates the mineral iron in the water is reacting with oxygen at the surface of the water in the bowl to form rust. These rust particles attach themselves to the porcelain surface at the water/air boundary and build over time.
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    Oct 27, 2012 12:15 AM GMT
    tereseus1 said
    Webster666 saidIf it's in the toilet tank, it's rust from the metal parts submerged in water.
    If it's in the toilet bowl, uh, maybe you should clean it more often.


    or just plain sewage


    No, not true. Gravity drains out the sewage when the toilet is flushed. Tidal flooding would be the only exception to this rule.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Oct 27, 2012 12:17 AM GMT
    ART_DECO saidA brown line usually indicates the mineral iron in the water is reacting with oxygen at the surface of the water in the bowl to form rust. These rust particles attach themselves to the porcelain surface at the water/air boundary and build over time.


    While not technically true, he is correct in saying its iron.
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:17 AM GMT
    ART_DECO saidA brown line usually indicates the mineral iron in the water is reacting with oxygen at the surface of the water in the bowl to form rust. These rust particles attach themselves to the porcelain surface at the water/air boundary and build over time.
    Finally, someone who's as nerdy as me, and knows the technologically correct answer. icon_lol.gif
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:28 AM GMT
    No doubt its minerals.

    Live near the country folk here, often they have well water....you should see THEIR rings. Plus they keep fixtures in place for 40 or more years.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Oct 27, 2012 12:30 AM GMT
    you live in florida
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    Oct 27, 2012 12:37 AM GMT
    so.....i guess you're not supposed to drink it huh??.....what about the dog?...
  • camfer

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    Oct 27, 2012 12:46 AM GMT
    It exists because you do not use a pumice stone to remove the line.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Oct 27, 2012 12:48 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidWell?


    You don't clean your toilet enough....lol
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    Oct 27, 2012 1:42 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    ART_DECO saidA brown line usually indicates the mineral iron in the water is reacting with oxygen at the surface of the water in the bowl to form rust. These rust particles attach themselves to the porcelain surface at the water/air boundary and build over time.
    Finally, someone who's as nerdy as me, and knows the technologically correct answer. icon_lol.gif


    We have this problem; it's manganese, along with lime and some iron. Go out and buy some Lime Away and use it in the bowl. Leave it for about an hour. You can also get citric acid crystals (any wine making store) in a sack like sugar. Take 6 tablespoons, mix it in 1/4 cup of warm water, then pour it into the tank and wait 3 hours. This will make the tank demineralized.
    Throw 5 tablespoons in the dishwasher and that will bring it back to it's white finish.

    Do this in the washing machine as well with whites.

    Pumice is an interesting idea, but it scores the porcelain and allows the minerals to penetrate into the sides of the bowl.
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    Oct 27, 2012 1:46 AM GMT
    Put a Clorox tablet in your tank.
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    Oct 27, 2012 1:49 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidPut a Clorox tablet in your tank.


    We tried bleach tablets etc. but no go.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Oct 27, 2012 1:52 AM GMT
    runny, watery, poooop
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Oct 27, 2012 1:56 AM GMT
    meninlove said Pumice is an interesting idea, but it scores the porcelain and allows the minerals to penetrate into the sides of the bowl.


    Haven't had the pumice scratch porcelain at all. It's very soft.
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    Oct 27, 2012 2:41 AM GMT
    Actually, most of the time it's plain old calcium scale from hard water. Bacteria and algae growing in it turn it brown. Some people do get iron and manganese deposits, but those are fairly rare in Florida, especially for municipal water. (Although we have seen a few private wells with metals problems.) Also, in some places, like here in the cascades, for example, there is enough dissolved silica in the water that clay forms colored deposits in the toilet bowl.
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    Oct 27, 2012 2:54 AM GMT
    camfer said
    meninlove said Pumice is an interesting idea, but it scores the porcelain and allows the minerals to penetrate into the sides of the bowl.


    Haven't had the pumice scratch porcelain at all. It's very soft.


    I'm guessing it depends on the medium the pumice is in. The previous owners of our house used a pumice stone. Ugh. Scratched the porcelain finish right though, and that's where the buildup is stubborn.
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    Oct 27, 2012 3:01 AM GMT
    Obviously because your foundation is too dark. Try a lighter shade that'd work best with your complexion.
    359bk10.jpg

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 27, 2012 3:07 AM GMT
    it's called scale...

    clean the bowl more often
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Oct 27, 2012 3:26 AM GMT
    Clean it with CLR (Calcium Lime Rust)

    S_18419_L.jpg
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Oct 27, 2012 3:28 AM GMT
    What a shitty thread.