Where do the good gym results come from?

  • Dominican_Gen...

    Posts: 379

    Oct 27, 2012 5:29 PM GMT
    I hope this subject has been posted before, but it is never bad to have a reminder. When you see people doing progess on the gym, where do that progress come from?

    IMHO, the formula is something like this:
    80% - Diet and nutrition
    10% - Rest and muscle recovery
    7% - Actuall gym/sport workout
    3% - Suplementation

    I have never used serious roids and if/when I do that 3% may change, but what's your take on that? With all the advertising and marketing in the fitness industry it is easy to loose track of the real important stuff.

    Care to give your input/experience?
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    Oct 27, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    Consistency.
    Proper form.

    But then I can drop 80 lbs in five months and look the way I do so what do I know.
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Oct 27, 2012 7:48 PM GMT
    I know that everyone says that it is 90% diet but I tend to disagree. I think training and lifestyle (outside of diet) is around 50% of the battle. Diet is very important but training is necessary. Maybe it is just my personal experience and what has worked for me.
  • SwimBIkeRun94...

    Posts: 480

    Oct 27, 2012 7:52 PM GMT
    I think there's a huge variable with the "diet" factor based on age.

    Lucky me, I can still eat just about whatever I want, whenever I want, with only small consequences.

    The key to results is consistency and frequency. If I take a week off from the gym, it shows. If I go to the gym 10x/week, my milkshake brings all the boys to the yard.
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:18 AM GMT
    50% motivation
    50% dedication
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1766

    Oct 28, 2012 9:24 AM GMT
    Awh I hope not, I can't sleep more than 6 hours
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    Oct 28, 2012 10:35 AM GMT
    You forgot to add genetics. That's a pretty huge portion of it.
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    Oct 28, 2012 10:51 AM GMT
    xrichx said50% motivation
    50% dedication


    this.
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    Oct 28, 2012 10:58 AM GMT
    xrichx said50% motivation
    50% dedication


    That's a nice thought, but those two things are meaningless without proper diet and form. I can have all of the dedication and motivation in the world, but it eating french fries everyday and and swinging weights around won't help anyone each their goal...unless that goal is frustration.

    but those are certainly part of the equation.
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Oct 28, 2012 11:28 AM GMT
    Good question, and good responses.

    A lot of this depends on how you define your terms. Are your workouts intense, balls-to-the-wall, "I couldn't do one more rep"... or are you just going through the motions? I totally agree that form is more important than weight, but you do have to challenge yourself. The body does not like to change, you have to force it. That means pushing yourself pretty hard, and as others have said, on a consistent basis. If you are not sweating and worn out at the end of your workout, what exactly did you accomplish?

    Diet: A strict, clean diet is critical, but it has to include enough calories, especially protein, to signal the metabolism: "Ok, we have energy to spare; go ahead and make those muscles bigger." Eat clean, but eat enough to grow.

    Rest and recovery: I would put a higher percentage on this, especially these days. The guys I know in their twenties don't sleep!! Maybe this is not true of everyone, but I feel like with cable tv, internet, texting, etc., no one ever gets any down time. We are evolved to rest and sleep for looong stretches every night -- artificial light is a very recent invention in human evolutionary history! Sleep is when muscles grow. That can't happen with only 4 or 5 hours of recovery per night.

    My $0.02
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    Oct 28, 2012 11:45 AM GMT
    Dominican_Gent saidI hope this subject has been posted before, but it is never bad to have a reminder. When you see people doing progess on the gym, where do that progress come from?

    IMHO, the formula is something like this:
    80% - Diet and nutrition
    10% - Rest and muscle recovery
    7% - Actuall gym/sport workout
    3% - Suplementation

    I have never used serious roids and if/when I do that 3% may change, but what's your take on that? With all the advertising and marketing in the fitness industry it is easy to loose track of the real important stuff.

    Care to give your input/experience?


    1. Understanding your Goals

    Progress has to be measured, if you want to get 'bigger' its good to have a goal - i.e. working towards a bigger chest - 1cm improvement in x weeks / months

    2. A plan to achieve those goals

    Working with what resources you have available including time, gym membership, budget for trainers etc if you need them, supplements. PLAN how you're going to get there ( eg Work out 5 nights a week for 1 hour, supplementing properly, resting properly, using a Weights coach / PT to help)

    3. Dedication to the Plan

    The meat and potatoes of the exercise - Doing the work, not letting shit get in the way.

    4. Review of your progress

    All plans can be tweaked, reality checked along the way - sometimes injury can set us back, review of the plan and going back to stage 2 as required helps to keep motivation, direction and dedication to the plan alive.



    The components you list above will contribute of course..
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Oct 28, 2012 11:51 AM GMT
    GWriter saidGood question, and good responses.

    A lot of this depends on how you define your terms. Are your workouts intense, balls-to-the-wall, "I couldn't do one more rep"... or are you just going through the motions? I totally agree that form is more important than weight, but you do have to challenge yourself. The body does not like to change, you have to force it. That means pushing yourself pretty hard, and as others have said, on a consistent basis. If you are not sweating and worn out at the end of your workout, what exactly did you accomplish?


    I was told the opposite of this. I heard that if you don't walk away from your work out feeling refreshed and energized then you didn't do it right. There's so much contratry information, it's hard to know what will work and what will not work.

    This has lead me to believe that there is no one formula. Different people grow in different ways and it's based largely on what actually works for you as an individual.

    I'm always up for hearing what works for other people though because I'm still trying to figure out what works for me.
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Oct 28, 2012 5:44 PM GMT
    FireDoor211 said
    GWriter saidGood question, and good responses.

    A lot of this depends on how you define your terms. Are your workouts intense, balls-to-the-wall, "I couldn't do one more rep"... or are you just going through the motions? I totally agree that form is more important than weight, but you do have to challenge yourself. The body does not like to change, you have to force it. That means pushing yourself pretty hard, and as others have said, on a consistent basis. If you are not sweating and worn out at the end of your workout, what exactly did you accomplish?


    I was told the opposite of this. I heard that if you don't walk away from your work out feeling refreshed and energized then you didn't do it right. There's so much contratry information, it's hard to know what will work and what will not work.

    This has lead me to believe that there is no one formula. Different people grow in different ways and it's based largely on what actually works for you as an individual.

    I'm always up for hearing what works for other people though because I'm still trying to figure out what works for me.


    I agree it depends a lot on what your goals are. I know a lot of natural bodybuilders and guys with pretty impressive physiques. None of them finish their workouts feeling "refreshed." That sounds like a commercial for some piece of shit exercise equipment geared to overweight housewives. Sorry, I don't mean to seem like an asshole. But building muscle is not "refreshing" -- it is hard work. Don't take my word for it. Ask the biggest guy in your gym (who isn't on steroids) if he works out to feel "refreshed."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2012 5:53 PM GMT
    Push the plate away!
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    Oct 28, 2012 5:53 PM GMT
    One word: DIET!!!
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    Oct 28, 2012 6:11 PM GMT
    If it's only 7% working out. . . why bother working out?

    Diet is a big deal, of course. . . but to me, working out consistently is equally important
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    Oct 28, 2012 6:16 PM GMT
    I may catch some flak for this, but I think genetics is by far the biggest factor. Everything you have to do to get the body you want is based on that. You have to adapt your diet to how you burn fat and gain muscle. Your energy level and ability to add muscle is based on genetics.

    That isn't meant to say that people who have excellent bodies don't put in the work to get them. Having good genetics by itself isn't enough. You have to be smart and take advantage of what you have to shape your body the way you want it.

    It also isn't meant to be an excuse for people who have bad genetics, like me (bad thyroid, slow metabolism). I may never be a bodybuilder, but I don't give up on getting myself into better shape.
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    Oct 28, 2012 6:19 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidConsistency.
    Proper form.
    This*^&

    xrichx said50% motivation
    50% dedication
    THIS***
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    Oct 28, 2012 6:33 PM GMT
    100% Consistency/Dedication

    Everything else will stem from that. If you are truly dedicated, you will educate yourself about proper nutrition, training habits, supplementation, rest cycles, and so forth. Conversely, if you make excuses as to why you can't be consistent in any of these areas, you will achieve less than optimal results.

    I suppose this is true of anything worth doing in life.
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    Oct 28, 2012 7:17 PM GMT
    It is an interesting question, and there have been many good responses. A lot of you have raised very good points but I'm not going to quote everyone.

    My formula- what I tell people when they ask me:

    10%- Working out. There are 168 hrs.in a week, and I spend about 3 hrs/day 5 days a week in the gym. That includes warm-up and stretching time.

    25%- Mental. This includes things like motivation, discipline, focusing on your workout, etc. Listen to what your body is telling you!

    25%- Rest. Your body grows and recovers when you are resting, not when you're training. You've got to get enough sleep(and that varies from person to person) if you want to build muscle.

    50%- Diet. You have to feed your body proper nutrients, and abs are still made in the kitchen!

    The thing to always bear in mind is that everybody is different i.e. every body is different. Just because a workout or diet plan works for me doesn't necessarily mean you'll get the same results. You have to learn what works for you.

    Do the math.
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    Oct 28, 2012 7:54 PM GMT
    Diet was the major factor for me in shedding 25 lbs since Aug 1 of this year.

    I also managed to force myself on the treadmill to do HIIT. Believe me, it works.

    I do treat myself to some bad foods but only on the weekends and I limit the amount.

    Some foods I completely cut out: doughnuts, fries, Papa John's, power bars (basically just sugar) and Trader Joe's Powerberries (again, just sugar) and bbq chips.

    Disciplining yourself to get to the gym and eat right isn't easy, but when it happens, the benefits you get make the sacrifices well worth it.
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Oct 28, 2012 8:15 PM GMT
    100% genes.

    That's not to say you can't achieve a body you want with a lot of hard work. For some people, it is just immensely easier.
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    Oct 28, 2012 8:19 PM GMT
    Rest is severely underrated, and the problem with diet is people have a very skewed perception of their own body composition and their diet habits (e.g. "what exercises can I do to tone muscle? I know it's not my diet because I already eat really well blah blah blah" when in fact they have an extra 25 lbs of fat on them they don't even realize they do and the solution is entirely diet based).
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    Oct 28, 2012 8:21 PM GMT
    All of the above responses are good because I don't follow them entirely. That's why I'm still a tubby. icon_lol.gif
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    Oct 28, 2012 8:31 PM GMT
    Bullwinklemoos saidAll of the above responses are good because I don't follow them entirely. That's why I'm still a tubby. icon_lol.gif


    1) You are so not a tubby.

    2) I do think genetics has a small role to play in here. Don't get me wrong - it's not everything, but I think that is one of many factors to the perfect equation.