raccoon as pets??

  • theONLYallan

    Posts: 69

    Sep 03, 2008 1:56 AM GMT
    Is it possible??

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    Sep 03, 2008 3:05 AM GMT
    Probably after a couple hundred years or so of selective breeding.
  • olden

    Posts: 194

    Sep 03, 2008 3:50 AM GMT
    Wild animals do not make good pets. No way, no how. Dogs have lived with Man for tens of thousands of years and have developed a mutual dependency - dog hunts for Man, Man feeds dog. Now look at the Cat. Cats have been with Man for thousands of years. At present the cat is about half domesticated. About twenty years ago, I read that the Russians were working on domesticating the Eland, a large African antelope, to use for meat. Since I have not read anything about this in years, it looks like it was a flop.
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:34 AM GMT
    They're insanely cute, yes, but raccoons aren't pets.

    Although some of them are willing to put up with humans just for the free food.

    raccoon
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:43 AM GMT
    I had one as a pet - and others that I just fed. They are moody and suspicious, even when tamed. I also had a possum (they dont live very long) and a fox.
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    Sep 03, 2008 5:26 AM GMT
    jesus christ! you HAD a fox or you ARE a fox? i think i have the vapors... i need a mint julip, pronto... chop chop!
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    Sep 03, 2008 5:52 AM GMT
    Really!? A fox!? =D How did that happen? Did you find him? Where'd you keep him? Did he have a name? What did you feed him with? How was he, personality-wise?

    OMGAFOX!!!!111uno =D
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    Sep 03, 2008 8:05 AM GMT
    In my psychology textbook, I read about how a person who had a pet raccoon for a long time (since it was a baby) got two of his fingers bit off because the raccoon reverted back to its natural instincts.

    Maybe not the best choice for a pet, though my mom had a pet monkey, and my uncle had a pet squirrel. =P
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    Sep 03, 2008 9:03 AM GMT
    I will laugh at your rabies.
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    Sep 03, 2008 11:21 AM GMT
    Like most animals, they're incredibly cute and sweet as babies, less so once the hormones kick in.

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    Sep 03, 2008 11:31 AM GMT
    When I was young I had a friend who had a pet raccoon that he'd raised from infancy. They do not really tame well. It was good with him even though I would occasionally bite him if it was not in a good mood. They are also very destructive as it had done far more damage to his house than any dog or group of dogs I'd ever known.

    I had a pet skunk years ago and I found that they far more capable of domestication. They tend to be like dogs in temperment although everyone assumes (incorrectly) that they are like cats.

    Raccoons are cute, but they don't make good pets.
  • Barricade

    Posts: 457

    Sep 03, 2008 12:59 PM GMT
    They are cute but kinda mean even as babies. On the other hand my friend says they taste good. icon_smile.gif
  • crinnigan

    Posts: 1

    Sep 03, 2008 2:29 PM GMT
    Rent the Documentary "Grey Gardens"
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    Sep 03, 2008 2:41 PM GMT
    They are ok for just a little while when they are young but never could be a great pet. They are very defensive and distructive but so dang cute. We let ours go after raising them for about 3 or 4 months. One still comes around about every night but he is no pet LOL.
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    Sep 03, 2008 2:54 PM GMT
    No no no no no. No way.
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    Sep 03, 2008 2:59 PM GMT
    crinnigan saidRent the Documentary "Grey Gardens"




    "Raccoons and cats become a little bit boring," sighs Edie Beale towards the end of Grey Gardens. "I mean for too long a time."
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:11 PM GMT
    Because of fur trapping where I grew up, there were many pups of various creatures that were found and often kept and raised as novelty pets, given to local kids who would care for them. The issue of rabies never came up....we were more afraid of armadillos and warned of leprosy. Most of these creatures lived/were raised outdoors and would come around and eat cat food/scraps with all the stray cats that were fed. Ones that were considered pets would be let into the house, but never allowed to stay in for the night and could not be house trained. But you could pet them and hold them.
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:13 PM GMT
    One of our fellow RJrs has a squirrel as a pet. Cute as hell!
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:17 PM GMT
    msw1 saidBecause of fur trapping where I grew up, there were many pups of various creatures that were found and often kept and raised as novelty pets, given to local kids who would care for them. The issue of rabies never came up....we were more afraid of armadillos and warned of leprosy. Most of these creatures lived/were raised outdoors and would come around and eat cat food/scraps with all the stray cats that were fed. Ones that were considered pets would be let into the house, but never allowed to stay in for the night and could not be house trained. But you could pet them and hold them.


    You mean they actually got along with the stray cats? Or did some of them flee at the sight of the other?
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    Sep 03, 2008 4:22 PM GMT
    Fable - rabies is not so bad, keeps me trim, although the foaming can be embarrassing.

    As for getting along...they were not close. They would be side by side while eating sometimes, but that is all. I dont remember any major conflicts, not even with the dogs.
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    Oct 27, 2008 12:11 AM GMT
    Have you ever watched the animated version of Pocahontas? What an obedient, helpful racoon she had as a pet, who also latched well to John Smith. Pity her little hummingbird pet did not cotton on to him so well and buzzed around him like an annoying insect! icon_biggrin.gificon_lol.gif
  • JayneCobb

    Posts: 709

    Oct 27, 2008 12:36 AM GMT
    My neighbors had a pet racoon that they raised from birth, it was really nice and never bit anyone.

    It was like a weird cat emotionally.
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    Oct 27, 2008 3:38 AM GMT
    Why would you guys want a pet that is the animal equivalent of a.....

    burglar Pictures, Images and Photos....Burglar Pictures, Images and PhotosBurglar Pictures, Images and Photos
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Oct 27, 2008 3:56 AM GMT
    As far as the commentary about foxes go, there was a good experiment on domesticating them. Dimtri Belyaev decided to domesticate the silver fox in order to study the process of domestication and the impact on organism. By selectively breeding the individuals who were the tamest, he essentially turned fox cubs into puppies, spending the last 26 years of his life on the project, though it continued after his death. Under very strict selection criteria (about the 5% tamest males and the 20% tamest females each generation), it only took about 10 generations for the foxes to eagerly seek out humans in non-aggressive ways.
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    Oct 27, 2008 4:20 AM GMT

    Probably not.

    They look too cute not to be pets, but I'd imagine it to be extremely difficult to domesticate a raccoon. Plus, they're evil icon_smile.gif. Even if it was possible to keep one as a pet, there is also that possibility that they can act unpredictable, aggressive and develop rabies.

    And besides, who wants a raccoon chewing on their crap anyways?