What are your thoughts on Schrodinger's Cat?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:38 AM GMT


    I believe that the cat has actually become an ogre. A SEVEN foot tall ogre! With a beard! And by opening up the box/hatch/whatever, it becomes exposed to our air and turns into a cat again.

    I believe I'm right. icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 28, 2012 4:26 AM GMT
    An interesting theory and movie. I think the only thing that may influence if the bomb goes off is the cat itself. I don't know how this works, but it is kinda cool to think about the possibilities they talked about.
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    Oct 28, 2012 4:32 AM GMT
    it's a big pile of horseshit...
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    Oct 28, 2012 4:40 AM GMT
    Everything is merely waves of probability until it's wave function is collapsed by observation. The only problem with the cat is the cat is there to observe this event; therefore a human isn't required. Just like "if a tree falls in the forest but no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound?" The answer is "no"...it does NOT make a sound. A tree does not make a sound when it falls. It creates waves of energy that the human ear and brain interprets as "sound". But for that to happen, a human ear, brain and body must be present, therefore it does not make a sound.
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    Oct 28, 2012 4:52 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidEverything is merely waves of probability until it's wave function is collapsed by observation. The only problem with the cat is the cat is there to observe this event; therefore a human isn't required. Just like "if a tree falls in the forest but no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound?" The answer is "no"...it does NOT make a sound. A tree does not make a sound when it falls. It creates waves of energy that the human ear and brain interprets as "sound". But for that to happen, a human ear, brain and body must be present, therefore it does not make a sound.


    Uh oh, this is from that psudo-science video What the bleep do we know
  • Kel_

    Posts: 1360

    Oct 28, 2012 4:55 AM GMT
    I like cats. I think they're cute and adorable.
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    Oct 28, 2012 7:27 AM GMT
    If you cannot see the cat in the bunker, was it ever really there? Did the cat exist in the first place?
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    Oct 28, 2012 12:45 PM GMT
    mikeinslc said
    Scruffypup saidEverything is merely waves of probability until it's wave function is collapsed by observation. The only problem with the cat is the cat is there to observe this event; therefore a human isn't required. Just like "if a tree falls in the forest but no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound?" The answer is "no"...it does NOT make a sound. A tree does not make a sound when it falls. It creates waves of energy that the human ear and brain interprets as "sound". But for that to happen, a human ear, brain and body must be present, therefore it does not make a sound.


    Uh oh, this is from that psudo-science video What the bleep do we know



    Huh?
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Oct 28, 2012 1:03 PM GMT
    not another one of these... people, it's a just a metaphor. it's a critique of the copenhagen interpretation. it has nothing to do with the cat being dead or alive. it has nothing to do with the cat at all. the idea is a possible occupancy of two states with certainty but unknown to the observer until observation.
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    Oct 28, 2012 1:57 PM GMT


    Hmmm...sound is vibration. Trust me, if a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, it still makes a sound. Record it remotely and then later play it back. You'll hear it crash. icon_wink.gif
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    Oct 28, 2012 1:57 PM GMT
    calibro saidnot another one of these... people, it's a just a metaphor. it's a critique of the copenhagen interpretation. it has nothing to do with the cat being dead or alive. it has nothing to do with the cat at all. the idea is a possible occupancy of two states with certainty but unknown to the observer until observation.


    Correct! The idea of superposition is that we may consider any possible outcome according to its relative probability as determined by the distribution function. So after one experiment we could say the cat has a 50% chance of being either alive or dead. We won't know until the observation is made. However, if we never make any individual observation and repeat the experiment enough times, we can say with mathematical certainty that 50% of the cats are alive and 50% are dead.
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    Oct 28, 2012 2:12 PM GMT
    calibro saidnot another one of these... people, it's a just a metaphor. it's a critique of the copenhagen interpretation. it has nothing to do with the cat being dead or alive. it has nothing to do with the cat at all. the idea is a possible occupancy of two states with certainty but unknown to the observer until observation.


    Exactly.

    Unfortunately the way Schrodinger's Cat is explained in many cases only confuses people to think that it is either that it is purely a philosophical question or an actual experiment that uses real cats.

    Better to watch a more applicable explanation.



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    Oct 28, 2012 2:30 PM GMT
    Quantum Mechanics is a very strange theory, indeed. It makes absolutely no sense whatsoever to the intuition, but it is outlandishly good at describing the world around us.

    That's important, because a lot of the people that brought us QM actually didn't want to accept its consequences. Einstein is a famous example, who came up with his own thought experiment. Schroedinger is another.

    There are many quantum physicists that created thought experiments to show that this or that feature of QM was impossible. They thought of them as paradoxes that showed how QM or a particular interpretation of it was wrong.

    As with Zeno's paradoxes, experiment ultimately proved almost all quantum paradoxes a limit of human understanding. Superpositions of large quantum objects have been observed, and if someone bothered building a Schroedinger's Cat experimental assembly, he or she would likely generate a superposition of a cat dead and alive. Including a 50% visit from the SPCA.
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:34 PM GMT
    So that's why I always seem to be getting in my own way. Well now it makes sense.
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    Oct 28, 2012 5:36 PM GMT
    theantijock saidSo that's why I always seem to be getting in my own way. Well now it makes sense.


    Your wave of potential keeps interfering with itself
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Oct 28, 2012 5:42 PM GMT
    Oh my god that was such. Painfully dumbed down explanation of the idea...

    What thoughts are you referring to? I didn't see a question about the theory...
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    Oct 28, 2012 5:45 PM GMT
    If they can transfer this theory to warp drive engines...I'll revisit this topic...Other than that...I'm telling PETA..icon_lol.gif
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    Oct 28, 2012 5:53 PM GMT
    on Schrodinger's cat:

    Maybe. Maybe not.

    (equal parts Quantum Mechanical and Taoist).
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Oct 28, 2012 5:53 PM GMT
    Let me try to add my two cents... This kind of macroscopic superposition of quantum states requires that a coherence between the wave functions of all the individual atoms is maintained for a significant amount of time. Quantum coherence is, however, very susceptible to disruption - and kind of random collision, scattering event, etc. will do it. That is, byt the way, what most "observations" are. To avoid that kind of disruptions, experiments demonstrating quantum coherence are generally carried out in ultra-high vacuum and at very low temperatures. A live cat, however, lives in a wet environment at room temperature. That means, ou have lots of thermal fluctuations, collisions of water molecules with other constituents of the cat, etc. In fact, if you didn't have those, the cat would be dead. In such an envirnment, quantum coherences cannot be sustained for long, femto- to picoseconds at best. Hence, you won't have a superposition of a cat in a live and dead quantum state for any length of time.

    Now, back to petting my two cats, who are very much alive and purring...