How does it really feel like being the citizens of...

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    Oct 28, 2012 5:13 AM GMT
    I know that many countries like Canada, Spain, Brazil have legalized and socially recognized Same Sex Marriage and by that way, the countrymen accepted the fact that the nation should treat LGBT community equally.

    But, I want to know is that really occurs when it comes to day to day business.
    I mean, do the society accept more freely the gay people just like any other random fact?

    My bros living in such countries, how is your experience in these senses?
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:04 PM GMT
    Still depends where you live in Canada. Stupid people seem to breed and spread their ignorance around.
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:09 PM GMT
    my bf is brazilian, there is so many hot young gays there, its accepted in all as ok, i find hard to meet straight ones lol

    but then families still have same problems with it and in work place being gay is normal for him,
    he works with others who are open but there are still jerks like some guys yelled out his car at him when he was on the street walking home some gay bash crap, i dunno how gay he was walking for a guy driving by to notice (lol)

    but that was outside the city, but he says its fine there in most parts,
    some areas gays just dont go,
    thats in Rio
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:12 PM GMT
    It's like anywhere else. Most of the gay-friendly parts in those countries tend to be in the major cities. But people in small towns or villages aren't quite as open minded about those sorts of things. Then of course, there's the age factor where younger people tend to be more accepting of the LGBT community than older people.

    When it comes to Spain, I'd say the most liberal and gay friendly parts are Madrid and surrounding areas, Barcelona and most of Catalunya, Balearic Islands, Basque Country, and Canary Islands. As for the more conservative parts of the country, I'd say Galicia, Cantabria, Extremadura, Ceuta, and Melilla.
  • runnermtl

    Posts: 129

    Oct 28, 2012 3:47 PM GMT
    Having moved to Canada - Montreal specifically - it has taken a while to actually come to terms with the fact that people really don't give a shit that I am married to a man. It was very strange at first, after having dealt with homophobia/ignorance all my life, but I love it.
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:51 PM GMT
    Canada has adjusted well, imho to this; some pissing and moaning at first but the lates poll shows 66% are accepting of it. We don't really have a 'redneck' region in the country. I don't think most people give a shit when it comes down to the crunch, and we have glbt in all walks of life, living open, successful lives.
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    Oct 28, 2012 3:52 PM GMT
    mpyear2010 saidI know that many countries like Canada, Spain, Brazil have legalized and socially recognized Same Sex Marriage and by that way, the countrymen accepted the fact that the nation should treat LGBT community equally.

    But, I want to know is that really occurs when it comes to day to day business.
    I mean, do the society accept more freely the gay people just like any other random fact?


    We find this (in the bold) very true.
    For a good year after getting married in the backyard in this small town, we had a sign in the truck that said, "Just Married" .
    We fully expected a few sneers, and had one, from another driver when in traffic, but usually strangers approached, sometimes winding down their car windows to yell congratulations. There is a large retired population here and they have been incredible.

    As well, when we married the crowd that came or wanted to come were a mix of Atheists, Catholics, Muslims, Sikhs, and a couple of Evangelists.

    The Muslim family down the street lent us chairs, the large Sikh family around the corner always talk to us, ask about my husband lol, and now say they are starting a petition in the neighbourhood to ask us not to move away next year.

    We're floored - and this is traditionally a very conservative leaning town.

    -Doug
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    Oct 28, 2012 4:03 PM GMT
    thanks guys.....the feedback makes me so much interested to move to these countries for at least some part of my life to enjoy that kind of freedom icon_razz.gif !!
    as usual meninlove, thanks for your wonderful reply icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 28, 2012 4:16 PM GMT
    mpyear2010 saidI know that many countries like Canada, Spain, Brazil have legalized and socially recognized Same Sex Marriage and by that way, the countrymen accepted the fact that the nation should treat LGBT community equally.

    But, I want to know is that really occurs when it comes to day to day business.
    I mean, do the society accept more freely the gay people just like any other random fact?

    My bros living in such countries, how is your experience in these senses?


    South Africa here. I think every single country will have examples of people not excepting LGBT people, regardless of laws... That's human nature for you. Some criminals will focus on LGBT, just like they do other minority groups.

    I really believe my country is ahead of the curve. In both the workspace and outside of it, I have never met anyone who judge me for being gay. I have had people come to me and ask me a ton of questions (which some people would find offensive...) but, it was just that they wanted to learn more about LGBT, today, they are all great people. At the office, church, gym, even school, not any issues.

    For an African country I'm proud of south Africa's ability to make the LGBT community feel included. In some instances, I feel we have more rights than straights, lol.

    Again, not all might share my view...
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    Oct 28, 2012 5:25 PM GMT
    WorthTheEffort saidmy bf is brazilian, there is so many hot young gays there, its accepted in all as ok, i find hard to meet straight ones lol

    but then families still have same problems with it and in work place being gay is normal for him,
    he works with others who are open but there are still jerks like some guys yelled out his car at him when he was on the street walking home some gay bash crap, i dunno how gay he was walking for a guy driving by to notice (lol)

    but that was outside the city, but he says its fine there in most parts,
    some areas gays just dont go,
    thats in Rio

    That's about right. I live in Rio, at the city. Never had any problem with acceptance at all, there are several places for gay guys to go do gay stuff.
    You won't be discriminated for being gay at the streets or public places, unless you're that kind of person that loves drawing attention to yourself. Straight women, straight guys and lesbians that do that are also discriminated so it has nothing to do with sexuality.

    There are also places where there's nothing for gay guys to do, so as long as you know where you are you won't have problems with homophobia.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Oct 28, 2012 5:30 PM GMT
    In my experience, when comparing the descriptions of other western contries experience with being gay in general, and here, I'd say it's no different day to day. The only difference is our federal government steamrolled the provinces, unlike what's being done in America.

    So no, it hasn't changed my life considerably.
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    Oct 28, 2012 9:12 PM GMT
    yourname2000 saidLiving in Vancouver, it's just not an issue at all. I'm out to everyone and anyone. T and me aren't big on overt PDA, but we do peck hello/later, play footsie, etc...it's pretty obvious we're a couple in public, lol. Call each other 'babe', stuff like that.

    Before equality up here, we had the same religious nutters saying the sky would fall in....gay issues filled the news....hysteria ensued sometimes. After equality: nothing. There's nothing to complain about, so we're generally not in the news at all (except when there's a case of high school bullying, I guess). If anything, it's killed the gay ghettos --there's simply no need to cloister together. A gay wedding is no more "alarming" than an inter-racial or inter-religious coupling.

    We're just average, ho-hum members of society, imo. Nothing special about being gay up here now.


    That, plus the fact that Canada and Canadians are cool, is the reason why I'd like to live there....or at least retire there.