High Protein Vegetables!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 02, 2012 10:20 PM GMT
    374829_295123950598408_32955463_n.jpg

    Mmmm! I love ALL of these!

    How about you?
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    Nov 02, 2012 11:06 PM GMT
    Spinach: Yes
    Kale: I think so?
    Broccoli: Okay
    Cauliflower: No
    Mushrooms: Okay
    Parsley: I don't know
    Cucumbers: I don't know.
    Green Peppers: Yes.
    Cabbage: No
    Tomatoes: YES!

    This is very interesting since I focus on meat for my source of protein. I'mn definitely gonna be eating alot more spinach. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 02, 2012 11:11 PM GMT
    How bioavailable is the protein in those veggies compared to the egg? I believe eggs are awesomely absorbable by the body.

    And what's the quality of the proteins? The egg protein is perfect.
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:00 AM GMT
    great info... thanks for posting
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:02 AM GMT
    Sweet! Thanks for posting this. I'm a huge fan of all of these but I love spinach and eggs the best.

    I'm seriously wanting to eat some eggs and lift hard right now. Nom Nom Nom!
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:02 AM GMT
    Beans are a vegetable and have more protein than any of the veggies listed. Cabbage isn't a good source of protein. Looks like bogus and misleading information to me. Google tomato nutrition facts and look how much is in a tomato. It's not all bioavailable or complete either.
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:02 AM GMT
    This is a great contradiction for the people who say, "Wait. You're not eating any meat? Where's your protein?!"

    Thank you!
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:05 AM GMT
    Night_Owl saidThis is a great contradiction for the people who say, "Wait. You're not eating any meat? Where's your protein?!"

    Thank you!


    I'm a vegetarian. These are not good sources of protein. Seriously, get your nutrition information from somewhere reliable. RJ forums are not a good place since anyone can post anything regardless of education.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 03, 2012 4:07 AM GMT
    1) the most common cellular substance is protein, so it makes sense.
    2) animal protein is more bio available, especially when cooked.
    3) considering veggies are 70-90% water, these numbers are bullshit.
    4) what are their sources?
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    Nov 03, 2012 1:56 PM GMT
    I don't really understand what these percentages mean- there is clearly way more protein in chicken breast than a cucumber if you go by grams per serving- especially since cucumbers and tomatoes are mostly water.

    Also, lot of veggies need to be cooked in some way in order for you to digest them. Broccoli and spinach (and even carrots) are almost worthless if you eat them raw- they'll just make you constipated. I steam most my veggies. Your body can get the nutrition it needs from them that way and they taste way better- don't even need salt or dressing.

    A great resource on veggie health is Worlds Healthies Foods:

    http://www.whfoods.com/foodstoc.php

    It tells you how to prepare each food in the way to get the most nutritional value.
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    Nov 03, 2012 3:21 PM GMT
    I decided to crunch some number, being curious about how MUCH protein you get from meat vs vegetables.

    So far : 4 oz steak - 28 grams of protein
    I head of cauliflower, largest size - 16.6

    2 eggs - 12.5 grams of protein

    Broccoli, 1 head (called a stalk, not a spear which is smaller) 11 to 12 inches-
    8 grams of protein

    One 3 oz chicken breast - 24 grams of protein

    One lb of spinach - 13 grams of protein

    It appears that though vegetables contain more protein percentage wise, it requires much more volume in consumption to match that of a small portion of meat.
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    Nov 03, 2012 3:27 PM GMT
    Octo lavo vegeterian here for about 20 years. I couldn't do just veggies. Even with beans and legumes I still crave whey shakes, cheese and eggs and a few times a year I seem to just need some fish.

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/277983-how-much-protein-is-in-vegetables/
    "Spinach contains 5.3 g of protein in 1 cup, asparagus and broccoli contain 4.6 g, collard greens and Brussels sprouts contain 4 g. Green peas contain 8.6 g of protein in 1 cup....
    ...According to The Harvard Medical School of Public Health, the average adult in the U.S. gets his protein from 15 percent of his daily calorie intake, which is equivalent to 75 g of protein for those who need 2,000 calories a day. "
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Nov 03, 2012 3:41 PM GMT
    These percentages seem suspect.

    Still, there isn't one thing on that chart that isn't great stuff., even the beef, chicken and eggs.

    Just for grins, a recipe:

    Prep some pasta. Use spirals, or radiattore, or a nice tight sauce-holding shape.

    While it is cooking, saute mushrooms in a little olive oil and add garlic and salt and black pepper. Dump in a container of ricotta and a package or two of frozen spinach and get the whole thing nice and hot.

    Then drain the pasta and mix it all together, grate on some real parmesan.

    Healthy. hearty and tastes great!
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    Nov 03, 2012 3:44 PM GMT
    I don't like parsley but all others are good
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    Nov 03, 2012 3:53 PM GMT
    JOOU saidI don't like parsley but all others are good


    Juice it with carrots. It's very good tasting.
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:13 PM GMT
    Mum will always tell me to eat mushrooms...

    "Har...!! please finish your mushrooms! they are good for you"
    Me: icon_rolleyes.gif but I ate enough cabbage already.
    "No! you finish now!..
    Me: behind her 47.gif.

    Now I see she actually won! icon_rolleyes.gif mum always wins!


    I hated Vegetables when I was a kid! especially spinach..My mum showed me this!

    original.jpg
    Yes I eat them thinking ill be strong!! like Popeye but I was miserably icon_cry.gif suffering inside eating them.

    then again back to theory and reality Mum won! icon_rolleyes.gif

    * now i dont hate any of them cause I know but to be honest cucumbers are b o r i n g ! so as Cauliflower! icon_rolleyes.gif

    Team Broccoli! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 03, 2012 4:30 PM GMT
    looks like I'll be picking up some spinich, mushrooms, and some eggs icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 03, 2012 8:45 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidBeans are a vegetable and have more protein than any of the veggies listed.


    They're a legume actually icon_idea.gif
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    Nov 03, 2012 8:50 PM GMT
    I was wondering about the beans myself. Yes, they aren't TECHNICALLY veggies, but chick peas and such has lots of usable protein!
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    Nov 03, 2012 8:58 PM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    Night_Owl saidThis is a great contradiction for the people who say, "Wait. You're not eating any meat? Where's your protein?!"

    Thank you!


    I'm a vegetarian. These are not good sources of protein. Seriously, get your nutrition information from somewhere reliable. RJ forums are not a good place since anyone can post anything regardless of education.


    Vegetarian here too. For 17 yrs as a matter of fact. icon_smile.gif
    Not trying to start a war/argument/fight here. But I've noticed in many instances when someone posts nutritional information, especially on Vegetarian topics, you are the first person to always shoot it down with claims of that it's not true or they are wrong. Yet you never seem to show examples of what it should be.

    So? What in your "humble" opinion then are good sources of proteins from vegetables other than "beans" and tomatoes? Please enlighten us. (not implying at all that you don't know.)

    Tristan
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Nov 03, 2012 9:00 PM GMT
    YUM spinach! I make a spinach gratin that will make you guys swoon too.....
  • KJayasuriya

    Posts: 1253

    Nov 03, 2012 9:12 PM GMT
    Thanks for sharing. I enjoyed this very much! icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 03, 2012 10:33 PM GMT
    RunintheCity saidI was wondering about the beans myself. Yes, they aren't TECHNICALLY veggies, but chick peas and such has lots of usable protein!


    I'm not sure if it's a technicality or a convention, but okay, let's say not technically unless you throw those chickpeas in a salad. It is vegetation. Not that the same holds true for tossing in bacon bits unless they're faux bits.

    When I have a chipotle-spiced black bean burger which is mostly textured vegetable protein, black beans and rice, do I really require a vegetable on the side.
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    Nov 03, 2012 10:41 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidIt's very good to eat our vegetables but in order to get a reasonable amount of protein from say, a dark green leafy vegetable you'd have to eat a ton of it to provide you with enough protein for all our or body's protein building needs.

    For example, although kale is 45% protein it only has two grams of protein per cup (eight ounces). So if you want a serving of protein that provides you with roughly thirty grams of protein you're going to have to eat !FIFTEEN CUPS OF KALE! in order to acquire thirty grams of vegetable protein. Two cups is one pound so you're going to have to basically eat seven pounds of green leaves to get a decent amount of protein. This is not feasible unless you're a cow. icon_lol.gif


    Man, I had it all wrong! Now what to do with all this kale...
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    Nov 05, 2012 9:32 AM GMT
    musclefetish1 said
    bluey2223 said
    Night_Owl saidThis is a great contradiction for the people who say, "Wait. You're not eating any meat? Where's your protein?!"

    Thank you!


    I'm a vegetarian. These are not good sources of protein. Seriously, get your nutrition information from somewhere reliable. RJ forums are not a good place since anyone can post anything regardless of education.


    Vegetarian here too. For 17 yrs as a matter of fact. icon_smile.gif
    Not trying to start a war/argument/fight here. But I've noticed in many instances when someone posts nutritional information, especially on Vegetarian topics, you are the first person to always shoot it down with claims of that it's not true or they are wrong. Yet you never seem to show examples of what it should be.

    So? What in your "humble" opinion then are good sources of proteins from vegetables other than "beans" and tomatoes? Please enlighten us. (not implying at all that you don't know.)

    Tristan


    I never said tomatoes have viable amounts of protein ever.

    Beans can be used as a vegetable or as part of the protein group. Once the protein quota has been met with beans, the rest carry over to the vegetable group. It is a plant, has way more soluble fiber than oats, has protein only limited by the amino acid methionine, which is supplied by grains or nuts and seeds.

    Honestly speaking, read the nutrition facts label or look up whatever vegetable you are considering eating in the proper portion size. Then consider the PDCAAS, the protein digiestibility-corrected amino acid score, which considers both limiting amino acids (such as methionine in beans, and lysine in grains) as well as how absorbable the protein is from the digestive tract. You'll see that soybeans are as high as beef at 0.9 of the protein being absorbed, but vegetables are at the 0.75. That means you'd have to increase the quantity of vegetable eaten by 25% in order to use it as a viable protein source. Frankly, since 10% of the population actually eats the amount of vegetables they are supposed to per day, recommending vegetables as a means of protein intake is a poor nutritional guideline. Furthermore, since vegetables are low in calories per volume, they are low in protein per volume. 1 g of protein = 4 Calories. Most non-starchy vegetables have calories in the range of 1 Calorie (leaf veggies) to 7 Calories (carrot/broccoli). Add to that the fact that most of that protein isn't bioavailable to the body, vegetables, outside of beans (which yes are a legume but count as veggies if you meet your protein quota) are not viable for protein intake unless you process them and buy it in supplement form. People who take hemp protein supplements are trying to do this, however it also comes with more calories from fat unless processed to remove the fat. Of course, vegetarians usually try to get away from processed foods, but then look at the hemp protein supplements...

    Also, it is not my job to patrol forums for piss poor nutrition information that random idiots take for fact. You wouldn't take financial advice from just anyone would you? Would you let anyone without a psych/social work credential do psychotherapy? Would you let anyone without an MD perform surgery and diagnose you (well yes, some people let chiropractors do that lol)?


    This chart merely states that while spinach may be composed of 49% protein, it is not a good source of dietary protein, which this chart misleads you to believe. It is merely stating the constituents of the cell, and yes, all cells are made of fat, protein, carbs, and nucleic acids. You could say the same thing about human skin--yea it's composed mostly of protein, but from a dietary standpoint, it is mostly fat. That's why you remove chicken skin to remove the fat, even though skin is primarily composed of protein, it is mostly considered dietary fat.