RECREATIONAL use....

  • Jo3x

    Posts: 29

    Nov 07, 2012 4:34 PM GMT
    ..... gets popular recognition. This is major, I think it will snow ball the legalization of all drugs, at least for medical usage if not "recreational"

    go on Colorado and Washington.

    Jox
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    Nov 07, 2012 4:41 PM GMT
    Jo3x said..... gets popular recognition. This is major, I think it will snow ball the legalization of all drugs, at least for medical usage if not "recreational"

    go on Colorado and Washington.

    Jox


    Both States are going to see an unprecedented surge in tax revenues from this .

    Though some pundits have claimed it won't be that much, I think it will as these Sates will become holiday destinations much like Amsterdam with the wonderful exception of not having to leave the country. As well, the spin-offs in taxes on hotel accommodations, restaurant meals (lol) etc will also experience a nice surge. It takes it out of the hands of the illegal trade, which should also reduce some judicial and policing costs.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Nov 08, 2012 3:02 AM GMT
    Federal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:03 AM GMT
    Awesome to go to 7-eleven and just ask for a quarter bag. (plus tax of course)icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3284

    Nov 08, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidFederal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.


    I cant get how a state can enrich itself in violation of federal law.

    It is no different than selling the drugs in a state store.

    The DEA regulations are over the top and need reform.

    I cannot see how these laws can be implemented without some big changes to federal law.
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:19 AM GMT
    Voters in Detroit approved the city's Prop M yesterday. Those over 21 can now possess 1 oz or less of marijuana in their home, car, or on private property.
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:55 AM GMT
    musclmed said
    Webster666 saidFederal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.


    I cant get how a state can enrich itself in violation of federal law.

    It is no different than selling the drugs in a state store.

    The DEA regulations are over the top and need reform.

    I cannot see how these laws can be implemented without some big changes to federal law.


    The Executive Branch of the U.S. Federal government might not have sufficient resources to adequately enforce certain laws. A fiscally conservative "smaller government" means that Federal law enforcement resources may be stretched. Further, Federal law enforcement agencies may have to prioritize the pursuit of violent criminal ahead of the pursuit of non-violent criminals.

    In the mean time, I hope that state governments enjoy rich tax revenue streams.
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:56 AM GMT
    musclmed said
    Webster666 saidFederal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.


    I cant get how a state can enrich itself in violation of federal law.

    It is no different than selling the drugs in a state store.

    The DEA regulations are over the top and need reform.

    I cannot see how these laws can be implemented without some big changes to federal law.


    Which is why the federal ban on drugs needs to be totally overturned or SERIOUSLY and DEEPLY revised.
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    Nov 08, 2012 4:07 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidFederal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.

    This might be of concern to some dealers, but occasional recreational users are probably not worrying too much about federal authorities coming to their door.
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    Nov 08, 2012 4:14 AM GMT
    GAMRican said
    musclmed said
    Webster666 saidFederal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.


    I cant get how a state can enrich itself in violation of federal law.

    It is no different than selling the drugs in a state store.

    The DEA regulations are over the top and need reform.

    I cannot see how these laws can be implemented without some big changes to federal law.


    The Executive Branch of the U.S. Federal government might not have sufficient resources to adequately enforce certain laws. A fiscally conservative "smaller government" means that Federal law enforcement resources may be stretched. Further, Federal law enforcement agencies may have to prioritize the pursuit of violent criminal ahead of the pursuit of non-violent criminals.

    In the mean time, I hope that state governments enjoy rich tax revenue streams.
    Which if you look at it, that's the diametric opposite of the GOP mantra "small government"
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    Nov 08, 2012 4:58 AM GMT
    Calcasieu said
    musclmed said
    Webster666 saidFederal laws (criminalizing marijuana) trump state laws.


    I cant get how a state can enrich itself in violation of federal law.

    It is no different than selling the drugs in a state store.

    The DEA regulations are over the top and need reform.

    I cannot see how these laws can be implemented without some big changes to federal law.


    Which is why the federal ban on drugs needs to be totally overturned or SERIOUSLY and DEEPLY revised.


    Agreed. What we've been doing for decades on the 'war on drugs' doesn't work. Let's try something new .... legalization
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:28 PM GMT
    Someone here will recall: What was that gawd-awful website Michael Steele put together when he was chairing the GOP? The one where he freaks you out by walking onto the screen?

    (EDIT: Found it. It was a reboot of "GOP.com," back in 2009, including a running blog from then-chairman Steele called, "What Up?" Tres hip!)

    http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2009/10/new_gop_web_sit.php

    Anyway, Steele's big idea was allowing "Americans" to go online and post their suggestions on what should be America's (specifically, Congress') top priorities, and people could vote up or down on whether they agreed with individual proposals. Steele asserted the top ideas will be turned into legislation, demonstrating the "party of new ideas" will indeed listen to the people.

    After a couple months, the number-one, highest-rated, most-favorable suggestion?

    Legalize (but regulate) marijuana.

    GOP shut that part of the website down and said no more about it. icon_lol.gif

    I'd like to know, though, why we can't have Regulated Cannabis on the 2016 Democratic platform.
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:41 PM GMT
    dayumm saidSomeone here will recall: What was that gawd-awful website Michael Steele put together when he was chairing the GOP? The one where he freaks you out by walking onto the screen?

    (EDIT: Found it. It was a reboot of "GOP.com," back in 2009, including a running blog from then-chairman Steele called, "What Up?" Tres hip!)

    http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2009/10/new_gop_web_sit.php

    Anyway, Steele's big idea was allowing "Americans" to go online and post their suggestions on what should be America's (specifically, Congress') top priorities, and people could vote up or down on whether they agreed with individual proposals. Steele asserted the top ideas will be turned into legislation, demonstrating the "party of new ideas" will indeed listen to the people.

    After a couple months, the number-one, highest-rated, most-favorable suggestion?

    Legalize (but regulate) marijuana.

    GOP shut that part of the website down and said no more about it. icon_lol.gif

    I'd like to know, though, why we can't have Regulated Cannabis on the 2016 Democratic platform.


    And the 2016 republican platform! I've been to a few conventions and well aware of how much is consumed.
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    Nov 08, 2012 3:50 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    Agreed. What we've been doing for decades on the 'war on drugs' doesn't work. Let's try something new .... legalization


    Yep, de-criminalize it, tax it and spend the money on preventive education (especially for young people).