Is there a definitive science based review/analysis/research site for supplements that I can use to make an informed decision about what I should or should not be taking, if anything at all? TKS!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 09, 2012 7:20 PM GMT
    Was getting some advice from a trainer about diet and nutrition.

    I eat very healthy, drink a protein shake (whey protein from Whole Foods 365 Brand) after I workout, lots of water throughout the day, eat at regular intervals, take the following: a mutli-vitamin, vitamin D, glucosamine/msm/chrondriotin for joints and androgel for low T.

    The trainer suggested that I take Amino X and he explained why.

    Do I really need to take Amino X? Where is the science?

    Is there a definitive science based review/analysis/research site for supplements that I can use to make an informed decision?

    Thanks!
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    Nov 09, 2012 9:57 PM GMT
    It takes a lot of research sorting the wheat from the chaff sometimes, and much of it is trial and error. Just because I respond well to a particular supp doesn't necessarily mean that you will.

    Having said that, the sites I find helpful are:

    www.Bodybuilding.com

    They have detailed explanations of the different supps, and I find the user reviews a good general guide.

    This site: http://supplementreviews.com/ can also be helpful.

    I don't know of any sites that are going to give you hard science on individual brands etc., that's something you and Google need to figure out for yourselvesicon_smile.gif
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    Nov 09, 2012 10:21 PM GMT
    Sungod17 saidIt takes a lot of research sorting the wheat from the chaff sometimes, and much of it is trial and error. Just because I respond well to a particular supp doesn't necessarily mean that you will.

    Having said that, the sites I find helpful are:

    www.Bodybuilding.com

    They have detailed explanations of the different supps, and I find the user reviews a good general guide.

    This site: http://supplementreviews.com/ can also be helpful.

    I don't know of any sites that are going to give you hard science on individual brands etc., that's something you and Google need to figure out for yourselvesicon_smile.gif


    Both of these sites are considered "lay" websites.

    To answer the OP, no there is not such a database yet. Furthermore, supplements are not regulated by the FDA until they cause adverse effects. It is officially the responsibility of the manufacturer to ensure the active ingredient is present in the right quantity/quality, which it often is not, and there is no regulation on manufacturing practices to prevent contamination of supplements with ingredients not on the label. They also don't have to list all that is in the container if they don't want to.

    Use at your own risk.

    There are 3rd party reviewers like NSF, which university sports dietitians look for to prevent their NCAA athletes from testing positive for banned substances, which is actually common if you aren't using 3rd party reviewed supplements.

    Supplements are basically a marketing scam. There is no need to take anything other than your multi-vit and vitamin D, which both have good research behind for supplementation. Glucosamine is still controversial as beneficial or placebo. I stopped taking it because it's $60/bottle...

    Also, be aware that taking testosterone will increase the risk of prostate cancer.
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    Nov 10, 2012 1:03 AM GMT
    I looked at bodybuilding.com a few years ago, and gave up on it. (Although I have to say that I really admire their marketing models.) The product manufacturers supply ludicrous pseudo-science babble. A few contributors look up abstracts on PubMed and argue about them, but they don't look at the actual paper or appear to understand what they're babbling about in the first place. If you can read the medical literature, go straight to PubMed then get the relevant articles at the nearest university library.

    One striking thing I noticed was that of the few real studies that get published on this stuff, most are a really simplistic trial with a small number of elite athletes. (Or for weight loss stuff, a few morbidly obese people.) People who already have perfect metabolism and hormone production. An argument could be made that it would be more interesting to see whether the stuff could benefit the average weekend warrior. Which is who all the marketing is aimed at.
  • morleyq

    Posts: 175

    Nov 10, 2012 4:34 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidSupplements are basically a marketing scam. There is no need to take anything other than your multi-vit and vitamin D, which both have good research behind for supplementation. Glucosamine is still controversial as beneficial or placebo. I stopped taking it because it's $60/bottle...

    I know it's anecdotal, but I've seen sufficient improvement from Glucosamine/MSM/Chondrotin that I figure I might as well take it. So do my dogs after the vet recommended it.

    A lot of this stuff is marketing scam and I'm guessing a high-profit margin given that every other week it seems I see various brands being sold for buy-on-get-one-free. Why would anyone buy this stuff when it's not half off?

    You also need to compare the potency of what you're buying carefully. The last Glucosamine tablet I took was about 1/3rd of my current one and if you read the label carefully, said to take 2 at a time.

    Right now I'm taking Osteo Bi-Flex which not only regularly goes on BOGOF sales, but also has $4-6 coupons in the paper. So instead of paying ~$40 for two bottles, I'm paying ~$10! The bottle says to take twice a day, but I figure that's overkill and like with various vitamins will simply end up in my urine so I probably only take it 5 times a week. Thus my $10 investment lasts for maybe half a year. I'm willing to risk that much even if it is just for a placebo effect.

    Before games or tournaments I also take B-100 complex (and I stay away from the various 5-hour energy supplements). Some days I play better than others, but I don't know how much that has to do with the B-complex.

    I don't do the multi-vitamin, but I do eat a lot of veggies (including uncooked and unpeeled). Just had some carrots and radishes -- shared, of course, with the dogs.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 10, 2012 4:45 AM GMT
    Pick up some Life Extension magazines.
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    Nov 11, 2012 2:30 AM GMT
    Thanks for all your input and insight!

    I am going to continue eating healthy, whole foods, a whey protein shake, a multi-vitamin, the glucosamine and my vitamin D.

    Thanks again!

  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 11, 2012 2:42 AM GMT
    Be a caveman and eat plants and animals. You'll grow bigger and survive diseases.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 11, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    But SixStar Protein shakes will get you bigger.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 12, 2012 3:01 AM GMT
    It's all trial and error. Try different supplements/brands until you find the right one(s) that work for you. If a trainer tells you to take XYZ supplements, then he's just trying to sell you XYZ supplements.
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    Nov 12, 2012 3:19 AM GMT
    As a trainer myself, my opinion is that you're good with the stack you've got going.

    Basically the only "necessary" supplements I would recommend for everyone is a good whey protein powder and a good multi (beware cheap multis; they use ingredients in forms that are not very absorb-able i.e, magnesium oxide vs. magnesium citrate, etc.).

    Unless you're planning on becoming a bodybuilder, those supplements will help you achieve your goals.

    Taking a BCAA (branch chain amino acid) supplement can be helpful when taken before, during, and/or after your workout. It helps your body recover faster from intense exercise, and can sometimes decrease delayed onset muscle soreness. But all this info can be found on those "lay" websites listed in previous posts. Taking BCAAs definitely will only help you, but if you're training with a trainer that works at a large chain gym, he might just be trying to meet his sales quota for the month, which is totally fine, but just don't let him tell you that you HAVE to buy a certain supplement. But certainly take into consideration his suggestions.