Dropping out of college: Terrible idea?

  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Nov 13, 2012 1:48 PM GMT
    Maybe some of the mature men on here can give a good opinion, or at least get some entertainment from my woes. I'm doing terrible in school, already at my second school, been going at it for a year and a half. I know that I'm in the right subject area and I love my major (apparel design), I just don't have the drive to get through the years of schooling. Part of my problem may be maturity (I graduated high school a year early and went straight to college), but the rest is just discipline and drive. 98% of the time I couldn't give a flying shit about my schoolwork or grades, I just want to crawl in a hole and die at the thought of classes right now. My ideal plan would be to go back to school later, maybe after some work experience and more drive and determination. Plausible?

    But how bad of an idea is it to go out into the world in 2012 with just a high school diploma? Will I die? Will I be struck with lightning?

    Thanks for listening to my ramblings, all opinions appreciated.
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Nov 13, 2012 1:49 PM GMT
    As apology for a whiny thread, here's a little hunk for the day:

    tumblr_md4t7tUbU61rjliszo1_500.jpg
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    Nov 13, 2012 1:50 PM GMT
    Drop out. For the vast majority of people, all they learn in college is how to consume drugs and alcohol and still remain employable.
    Best to drop out now and steer clear of long term debt.
    I have a couple of advanced degrees I'd be willing to sell you for cheap.
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    Nov 13, 2012 1:50 PM GMT
    How many years do you have left?
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Nov 13, 2012 2:02 PM GMT
    McQueen saidHow many years do you have left?

    A million.
    I'm in an associates program that can transfer into a bachelors. In the associates I still have a year and a half, maybe a little less. But I've been steadily failing 2 classes every semester so...
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    Nov 13, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    kevmoran said
    McQueen saidHow many years do you have left?
    A million.
    I'm in an associates program that can transfer into a bachelors. In the associates I still have a year and a half, maybe a little less. But I've been steadily failing 2 classes every semester so...
    I ended up doing 3 years for a 2 year program because I dropped some classes, and I'm glad I got it over with. Some days I'll think about how fucking awful it was and be so glad that I can just look for a career now.
    I didn't have the financial side to worry about though so I dunno if that's a deciding factor for you.
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Nov 13, 2012 2:16 PM GMT
    McQueen saidI ended up doing 3 years for a 2 year program because I dropped some classes, and I'm glad I got it over with. Some days I'll think about how fucking awful it was and be so glad that I can just look for a career now.
    I didn't have the financial side to worry about though so I dunno if that's a deciding factor for you.

    I don't either because I got enough scholarships that my dad was able to pay. But that's almost worse because we have a set amount of money put aside, and I'm afraid of wasting all of it now when I could use it much more wisely a few years down the road. Blegh can I just marry a rich man or what.
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    Nov 13, 2012 2:40 PM GMT
    I have a masters in physics and am a phd candidate right now, but i am frustrated and fed up, I wish i had looked for a job after my masters and not gone into phd program, phds and masters are overrated, if you are able to get a job that pays well without the education then go ahead for it.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Nov 13, 2012 2:47 PM GMT
    Take that marry a rich man dream out of your mind. While some old guy might find you attractive now, in a couple years he'll dump you for the next young kid. Get this really straight and firm in your mind ... no one cares about you but you and you have to take care of you for the rest of your life ... take a good look at the people panhandling for money and check out the people in the soup lines ... you could become one of them ... your parents are not going to be there to help you forever, someday you have to return the favor and help them out a bit too. It's a cruel world that has no pity on anyone, so give yourself every advantage that you can. .... REALLY, you can't find any friends in college you like to study with???
  • Pontifex

    Posts: 1882

    Nov 13, 2012 2:50 PM GMT
    Are you sure you are studying the right area? If you don't have drive to do put in the effort maybe you aren't as interested as you think.

    That being said... I meandered my way through school with my interest and goals changing on a monthly basis for a few years, Then I took some time off, came back and did pretty well. A lot of people aren't capable of doing that. Most people who take some time off end up not going back and never manage to get back on track. If you don't have the drive right now I'm not sure that it would be a great idea.
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    Nov 13, 2012 2:50 PM GMT
    A lot of people are successful without going to college. But they usually had a plan.

    Before you drop out, ask yourself "what would I do instead?"

    Without an answer, you will just be floating in the wind...
  • PR_GMR

    Posts: 3831

    Nov 13, 2012 2:51 PM GMT
    Hang in there.. and finish! You can't see the forest from the trees now because you're young, but a full college education matters a lot. I dropped from college when I was in my twenties... but went back and finished a film degree 7 years late. Strongest thing I've ever done. Maybe take a break for a year.. but do go back and finish.

  • Nov 13, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    Dropping out entirely looks like not the best Idea.. is it possible for you to take half of the courses each semester? this way you will pay less (is this the case in your Uni?). Or, you can break for a while, and continue again later. It will take more time, but at least you can finish it. I am among people who believe that education is very important and it is a saving for your future.. and when you have a degree, you will be paid more icon_biggrin.gif

    Keep fighting...
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    Nov 13, 2012 3:04 PM GMT
    Quick question because I honestly don't know, but does one actually need a degree for apparel design? E.g. art degrees. Sure they're out there, but you don't actually need one to be a successful artist. If you want to design apparel, maybe try to get a start actually doing some design work.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 13, 2012 3:05 PM GMT
    Note: unless you're very, very lucky, you will not go far on a high school diploma. By not far, I mean McDonald's (though they do pay quite well).

    The point of a degree isn't what it's in nowadays. It's to show commitment and a willingness to learn. A partial degree will, to many major employers, be a black mark.

    As for coming back yo it, it's tough. Took me six years to get Bach. Now in 24, in my first year, and way behind everyone else. Just get it done. An Associates Degree in only two years. You've been in school for, what, a semester? You need a goal in mind to drive you. Apparently just the degree isn't enough. That is something you need to find.

    What do you ultimately want o o with our life, is this the way to get there, and what else is needed?
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    Nov 13, 2012 3:13 PM GMT
    kevmoran saidMaybe some of the mature men on here can give a good opinion, or at least get some entertainment from my woes. I'm doing terrible in school, already at my second school, been going at it for a year and a half. I know that I'm in the right subject area and I love my major (apparel design), I just don't have the drive to get through the years of schooling. Part of my problem may be maturity (I graduated high school a year early and went straight to college), but the rest is just discipline and drive. 98% of the time I couldn't give a flying shit about my schoolwork or grades, I just want to crawl in a hole and die at the thought of classes right now. My ideal plan would be to go back to school later, maybe after some work experience and more drive and determination. Plausible?

    But how bad of an idea is it to go out into the world in 2012 with just a high school diploma? Will I die? Will I be struck with lightning?

    Thanks for listening to my ramblings, all opinions appreciated.


    I was raised with a saying "Bite the bullet and do it."

    Try figuring out WHY you don't have the drive. If you have the money to not go into huge debt AND you have a major you love (two factors to why many people leave college), something else is a problem. If its the desire to get out and be in the "real world," you will have plenty of time for that later on.

    I agree with other's, my Master's hasn't done me squat (except for be a great experience) but you need a college degree to get a decent job. That's just how it works now unless you know the right people or are extremely lucky. So unless you were related to Steve Jobs, bite the bullet.
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    Nov 13, 2012 3:16 PM GMT
    There are individual cases where it's ok to drop out.

    Yours isn't one.

    Doing poorly and not being motivated are far from being good reasons to drop out.

    Dropping out to start Facebook = Good choice

    Dropping out because you're doing badly and just don't care = Terrible reason.
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    Nov 13, 2012 3:49 PM GMT
    I know how difficult it is to get inspired by certain classes. I got discouraged by college and stopped going to pursue flipping real estate. I wish I had completed my degree in my early twenties. I might be farther along in a good paying career I enjoyed.

    Be patient, stay focused and push through. You can do it.
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    Nov 13, 2012 3:53 PM GMT
    smartmoney saidDrop out. For the vast majority of people, all they learn in college is how to consume drugs and alcohol and still remain employable.
    Best to drop out now and steer clear of long term debt.
    I have a couple of advanced degrees I'd be willing to sell you for cheap.


    It sort of all depends on if the degree is marketable. There is no reason to go into debt for a degree that will never pay back.

    If you think the job market is strong based on your research then maybe you should go ahead.

    Will having the degree raise your standard of living or open the door to a career you really want? Do you want a higher standard of living?

    If you don't have the drive and determination maybe you should take a break and try later.

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    Nov 13, 2012 3:55 PM GMT
    Well, I don't know about America, but here all the people I know who decided to stop studies "temporary", never went back to it. Keep in mind it will be difficult to go back on this decision, especially if you hate studying so much.
    But if you really feel that it is what you have to do, then don't listen to anybody and trust your intuition icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 13, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    I am a college instructor and some may be surprised or not like my advice.

    I think that you should consider dropping out and getting a job at an entry level in the fashion field. Chet some real world experience and develop a work ethic. Come back to this when your maturity level is better. You will appreciate the education more and focus and do better in your courses.

    I always want people to stay in school and succeed, but it seems like you've already identified the problem. Perhaps working a while will remind you of what you are missing out in by not being in school.
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    Nov 13, 2012 4:05 PM GMT
    Definitely stay in school. The reasons go on and on. It sets you apart from others who don't have your level of education. It proves that you have the discipline to complete a long-term endeavor. These things are just the tip of the iceberg.

    Plus, it'll make for an awkward job interview when the interviewer asks "So why did you leave school?" and your reply is "I couldn't give a flying shit about my schoolwork or grades." icon_wink.gif

    I went back for a grad degree (law) after 10 years in tech so please trust me when I say that school is WAY more doable when you're younger. I didn't like the program, but I'm VERY glad I stuck it out.

    If you're lucky enough to have the finances to get an education, I strongly recommend you hang in there.

    Good luck!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 13, 2012 4:07 PM GMT
    From my viewpoint, the important thing is to have a plan. If you don't like college or your courses, what do you have to put in its place? I would absolutely be against you quitting and then struggling, looking for a job and feeling, I'll say, "challenged".. not a good scene at such a young age.

    My suggestion is to drop the courses you are failing, keep the ones you aren't and really look for a job. I like the input you have received above about "entry in the fashion world". Whatever you do..... make sure to keep
    something positive in your life and always remain open minded about finishing school, even if you do quit and work a job.

    I just think quitting without work right now would be a mistake.
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    Nov 13, 2012 4:08 PM GMT
    My knee jerk reaction is to say "stay in school and get your degree", but I don't know enough about your industry to say that for certain. Do you need a degree to get a job in the industry? Do you need a degree to get paid well in the industry? Do you need a degree to advance beyond gofer work in the industry? Not all jobs in the apparel design industry are actually designing clothing and for more of the advanced positions I pretty much guarantee that you need a degree.

    I'm very concerned about your lack of drive. Will that translate into your work ethic as well? If the answer is either "yes" or "maybe" you need to do something about it. Maybe the answer is to drop out and get a taste of the real world and how hard it is to make a living and make ends meet. You're young enough to waste a year or two to find out, but I wouldn't waste too many.

    Perhaps you can get an entry level job in the industry either to test the water or to allow you to finish your degree part time. Many people drop out with the intention of going back to finish later, but large numbers of them never get around to going back and get stuck in life's rat race. Think long and hard before dropping out. The college process is only a few years out of a lifetime, but in the overall the benefits far outway the struggle to get through it.
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    Nov 13, 2012 4:16 PM GMT
    Sometimes it's OK to take a break, but I think it's important that "taking a break" does not equal "never going back."

    I took a year off after high school because I knew I didn't want to jump straight into college. High school was tough for me (socially and mentally, not academically), and I was very driven to just make some big changes, get out in the world, and do some work.

    That year ended up being the best thing I could have done. I moved out to California, got a decent job to keep me busy and give me some good work experience, and funny enough, it drove the point home that college was something I really needed to do if I wanted to continue to excel in my career field.

    So I applied that fall instead, ended up deferring until the following spring (didn't start until almost two years after high school), but when I got there, I knew why I was doing it and it felt like the right time for me. I still went through a couple phases of, "What am I doing here?!" but I'm glad I finished, and I definitely don't think I would have achieved what I have today without making it through school.

    Best of luck, whichever path you choose!