Sugar Intake when Gaining

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    Nov 14, 2012 2:40 AM GMT
    So I keep track of my calories and daily intake of nutrition. I'm doing great eating my calorie goal (which is tough in itself), but I realize I'm taking in a lot of sugar unintentionally.

    For example, today I'm at 160 grams, and that's only from my breakfast, 2 pieces of fruit, some fruit yogurt, and the rest is milk. I never have chocolates or junk food. I do drink a lot of milk to get the calories up throughout the day between main meals.

    So question is, anyone know a suggested amount of sugar that someone who is gaining should generally consume? Of course I'd like to gain lean muscle, but I'm concerned that this sugar will contribute to un-wanted fat. Should I even worry about this?

    Thanks in advance!
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    Nov 14, 2012 6:21 AM GMT
    I think you're fine. I've heard that experts suggest consuming sugar (or simple carbs) in the morning after you get up and right after a work out.
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    Nov 14, 2012 6:55 AM GMT
    You should put your weight on your profile before I dole out my advice, but in short, it is not something you should worry about.

    There are different recommendations for sugar. However, the one I go by is:
    http://www.iom.edu/Global/News%20Announcements/~/media/C5CD2DD7840544979A549EC47E56A02B.ashx

    which is the link from http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary-guidance/dietary-reference-intakes/dri-tables

    It says less than 25% of your total kcal should be from added sugars. Milk is naturally occuring, not added sugar as found in candy, sodas, empty calorie food items such as pasteries. It is lactose. Unless you're getting GI discomfort from the lactose, you shouldn't worry about it. It gets broken into galactose and glucose. Galactose doesn't do anything except raise blood sugar until it gets converted into glucose by your liver.

    Gaining weight just means eat more calories than normal--so if that comes from sugar, what's wrong with that? Clean up your diet later after you've gained the weight. If you don't have a set goal for weight and expect to be getting bigger and bigger and bigger the rest of your life, you're in for huge disappointment and fattness until you take steroids, which I personally don't recommend. That said, without you putting your weight on your profile, I can't gauge your frame size and make a proper recommendation of whether weight gain is a good idea for you anyway, assuming all is natural.

    You also never said if you're eating 160 g of sugar or if that is 160 g of carbohydrate. Big difference. 160g of carbs is fine since fruits, vegetables, calcium drinks, and grains (preferably using whole) all have carbohydrates. You're not going to eliminate major food groups from your diet, right?
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    Nov 15, 2012 4:19 AM GMT
    Thanks for the responses.

    I currently weight 150. The 160 grams of sugars are all sugars combined. Gathered from fruit, dairy, carbs, and whatever else. Basically whatever is shown on the nutrition facts. They're all "healthy" sugars but I thought what's sugar is sugar? Shouldn't it all be limited?

    I do make sure to get my calories and if that means taking in extra sugar then I will. This is my first time gaining so my goal weight for now is 165-170, which I think is ideal for my 5'10" height. Although I'm gaining, I'd still like to gain clean pounds as much as I can. I'd like to be presentable year-round =)
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    Nov 16, 2012 6:33 PM GMT
    Consider using choosemyplate.gov and tracking your diet for 3-4 days. You are confusing carbohydrate with "added sugars," the latter of which the general population is told is "bad" because it causes unwanted weight gain due to the lack of satiety sugar-sweetened beverages and foods have. In your case, seriously, just eat.

    There is a minimum required intake of ~130g of carbohydrate per day to maintain the tissues that can only use carbohydrate for metabolism. These tissues lack mitochondria required to use fat as an energy source: lens of eye, red blood cells (hence maintaining regular blood sugar from a dietary standpoint is a goal without having your body have to output stores from liver/muscle), nephron of kidney. Some tissues prefer to use carbohydrate: muscles and nervous system tissues, but they can also use fat and ketones, respectively, in less than ideal situations.

    The difference between carbohydrate and sugar is the length of the polymer and the composition, in some cases. Starch is glucose units in strands of 100s of glucose units, which is broken down more slowly than are the sugar units of glucose found in units of 2: sucrose, lactose, maltose. Additionally these have fructose and galactose, which aren't used by the body until they pass the liver, making them slower sugars than glucose. Anytime fructose or galactose goes through the liver, it has a chance of being converted into fat instead of glucose, depending on the body's current physiological need.
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    Nov 19, 2012 5:04 AM GMT
    ADA recommendation for sugar intake is 40g per day.