Muscle / Gym guys, need your advice.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 4:19 AM GMT
    What would you think if someone (like me) asks you randomly in the gym: "Hey you seem like you know what you are doing. I would like some help on exercises, would you mind helping me out during some days?" Or something along those lines...

    I have someone in mind to ask (we were in the same orientation group), but I haven't seen him at the gym at all and he used to be a PT, but I have only seen him around campus. However, I need someone who I regularly see at the gym to help. I got a few people in mind.

    Thanks guys.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 4:20 AM GMT
    sounds like someone wants to cruise the gym.....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 6:36 AM GMT
    This is tricky.

    As someone who does have a clue, I often just shrug when I see folks do the most idiotic things, and...they do do some stupid ass stuff.

    I've offered free advice a time or two and it's generally not well received. (Ignorant people are, after all, ignorant.)

    I think the answer to your question is how it's framed what it's about, and if the person you see seems approachable.

    I can't stand folks who won't do a little research for themselves. When it gets down to it...a muscle has a certain range of motion. It's really not that complicated. You can train for muscular, or sacroplasmic, hypertrophy; train to raise your AT or whatever. It's all well documented science.

    I think, in most cases it's not a bad idea to train intuitively, and watch those who seem like they really know what they're doing.

    All, that being said, if a person is seriously committed, I don't mind telling them they need to eat, or go home and recover (that's where the gains are made).

    Personal trainers...the vast majority in franchised gyms...are often idiots...with no sound basis in experience, nor training other than being a glorified rep counter, and often are completely clueless. E.g., having a 50 year old overweight woman do NASM unbalanced exercises: stupid in the n'th degree. She needs to walk every night with her husband, for starters. Unbalanced exercise is the last thing she needs. Weight bearing exercise for her as she gets into motion.

    Free advice: stay cool. It effects your exercise performance in a major way. If you see a moron in rubber sweats, a hat, or a ghetto outfit....believe the obvious: that person doesn't know how to approach training in the most effective way. DUMB.

    The answer, I guess, is you have to be perceptive. We all have the same 24 hours in a day. If you see me circuit training, and I'm humming along, please, let me get my training done. That doesn't mean I'm not a giver, nor a nice guy. That means I need to execute my own plan for success which includes lifting, cardio, stretching, etc....and...I need to get it done before it's time to eat again. It's science. You need to approach it that way. Exercise science, to be exact with specific goals.

    On a side note, yesterday on theheart.org there was a study that as few as 7 HIIT sessions can markedly improve AT (much more than steady state cardio). I've been touting it for years, and..it's ultra cool.

    As far as the person you've singled out, well, if you see them the worst thing they can say is no (well, maybe beat you up, etc.). It's all about perception of where the other person's head is at. Yes, gyms, are cruisey...lots of gay / bi guys go to them (for obvious reasons like GETTING AND STAYING IN SHAPE), and there are times where folks are more approachable than others. You need to be sensitive to that. You also need to learn to study on your own, put on your big boy pants, and...be a real boy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 6:54 AM GMT
    Honestly, working out with less experienced people is a huge favor, I am reluctant to do that for good friends of mine. My workout suffers because of the time spent on explanation, setting weights etc. im glad to do it for people i know. Seems
    like a way to cheap out on training sessions, or at least that's the case when friends of mine have asked the same thing. Just think about that when going to ask someone that question.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 6:57 AM GMT
    no, i wouldn't, its a pretty big commitment training someone, its much more involved than just asking for a spot. if you aren't sure about your form on certain exercises, there are probably some volunteer trainers in a college gym who can help you out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 6:58 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidHym...my question is, "Are patrons of a gym allowed to provide instruction in a weight room or with resistance equipment and not be responsible for any injuries that may be incurred?

    I'd probably suggest the person seek a personal trainer.

    And my first thought altogether? I'd be inclined that someone wants something for free and is trying to use me.

    But hey, if the guy is hot and he offers to blow me in the locker room then I'll seriously consider it.


    Everyone signs a wavier in almost every gym. It's been common practice for decades.

    Many, many, many personal trainers are ill qualified. That's why they started certifications, but, just a few really arm the person with everything they need.

    Training with folks, who are also gym members, is pretty common. Gyms get pissy if trainers train folks for money and they don't have their hand in the pot.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 7:00 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidHym...my question is, "Are patrons of a gym allowed to provide instruction in a weight room or with resistance equipment and not be responsible for any injuries that may be incurred?

    I'd probably suggest the person seek a personal trainer.

    And my first thought altogether? I'd be inclined that someone wants something for free and is trying to use me.

    But hey, if the guy is hot and he offers to blow me in the locker room then I'll seriously consider it.


    The last sentence was the best answer lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 10:33 AM GMT
    I have to agree with a lot of what Chuckystud says.

    First, do your research- there's tons of info on how to do exercises on Youtube, etc.

    Your approach to this person is everything. I don't mind talking and maybe giving a few pointers, but don't interrupt me in the middle of a set! When I'm resting between sets, or stretching is a better time to talk to me.

    Saying something like "Hi, I'm X. I'm new at this, would you mind if I asked you a couple of questions about training?" is more likely to get a favorable response from me than starting out asking for direct help.

    Remember that the guys who are serious about their training are in the gym to work, not socialize. When I'm in the gym that's my time for me.

    We all started somewhere.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 12:29 PM GMT
    I don't think anyone would want to do it, specially for a random guy.

    Maybe if the guy wanted to fuck ya he would do it though.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 1:17 PM GMT
    You could split the difference on the great advice offered above and ask him what resources he uses/used to develop his routine. That could be your basis for starting your research and breaking the ice with someone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 8:53 PM GMT
    Good answers. Definitely need to rethink.

    I kinda thought that someone would be excited to help because I guess it can be an ego boost. Also this isn't a membership fee gym. Its a university gym, so there is a somewhat community aspect to that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 9:03 PM GMT
    I think if you see someone doing something that you don't know how to do exactly that it's alright to ask him what he was just doing and why, but I don't think you can ask a stranger to train you.

    I never mind when someone just asks for some advice. It's obviously a compliment and very nice of them to think I might know the answer.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2012 9:22 PM GMT
    imasrxd saidI think if you see someone doing something that you don't know how to do exactly that it's alright to ask him what he was just doing and why, but I don't think you can ask a stranger to train you.

    I never mind when someone just asks for some advice. It's obviously a compliment and very nice of them to think I might know the answer.


    Yea I jumped the gun too quickly on asking for the whole PT thing. Just a few exercises and small advice is good enough for me. One time thing is good enough.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 16, 2012 12:39 AM GMT
    I wouldn't mind being asked for advice...flattered even...but if you say "for several days," I might be wary of how great a demand you want to put on my time. Just ask for help when you need it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 16, 2012 6:40 AM GMT
    You can always ask someone for a spot which doesn't take much time from their workout, otherwise it's typically most efficient to train on one's own. Asking repeated advice from individuals trying to train would be very disruptive to them and there's no reason to because qualified personal trainers with great reputations and credentials demonstrate exercises and give out training advice for free on YouTube. Since YouTube there's no excuse for anyone to have bad exercise form, yet it's still endemic in gyms what with people flinging weights around, relying on momentum and not isolating the muscle they're supposed to be training but working everything else (example - working their back and arms on the ab and lat pulldown machines).

    I'd take a beginner's program off RJ or bodybuilding.com and learn proper form from YouTube.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 16, 2012 7:01 AM GMT
    dude if you live in a university just find a workout buddy. I am sure that you have one friend that goes to the gym and knows his way around it. Just be his training partner and I am sure he will help you out (at least that is what I did). Not only that but you will be closer friends.
  • pelotudo87

    Posts: 225

    Nov 16, 2012 7:06 AM GMT
    I like the asking for a spot idea. I have met a TON of people by asking them for spots all the time, and once you get to know each other, you can pick their brain / ask for lifting advice once you get to know him.

    An idea for a pretty painless spot: if you don't want to get a spot on bench, you could always do preacher curls or barbell curls and ask for someone to help you get one or two more reps.

    Have you tried any online resources? Try bodybuilding.com. Search the forums and exercise videos. They are good resources. Check the avatars of the guys posting in the forums: if they look jacked, and multiple jacked guys agree with each other, you know that the advice is probably pretty solid, lol.


    Hope that helps!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 16, 2012 7:20 AM GMT
    people who are achieving results love to share the knowledge go for it ask , but everything you need to know is on bodybuilding.com and its all free
  • mindblank

    Posts: 275

    Nov 16, 2012 7:26 AM GMT
    If you're actually wanting advice and not to cruise, then go with a specific question in mind (but it may also open doors to make a gym buddy out of him or cruise or whatever).

    "I've noticed you seem to know what you're doing and I was wondering ____[insert specific question here]_____?"

    I know, easier said than done.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 16, 2012 2:36 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidPersonal trainers...the vast majority in franchised gyms...are often idiots...with no sound basis in experience, nor training other than being a glorified rep counter, and often are completely clueless. E.g., having a 50 year old overweight woman do NASM unbalanced exercises: stupid in the n'th degree. She needs to walk every night with her husband, for starters. Unbalanced exercise is the last thing she needs. Weight bearing exercise for her as she gets into motion.

    You said it, sister.

    I relocated a lot the past few years and joined several different gym chains and each one offers a free personal training session, an "assessment" if you will, with the expressed purpose of selling a series of training sessions (which is where gyms make their real money). Each and every time in advance I've notified the assigned trainer that I do yoga on a stable surface but given a variety of health and balance issues I absolutely should not work on any type of unstable surface, i.e. stability and bosu balls, and should not be performing lunges, complex compound movements or any type of cardio bootcamp/P90X type exercising. Yet each and every time the trainer blithely ignores me and stresses my knees and back out and risks having me fall by having me do crazy things like jumping alternate lunges and bosu ball squats because, I suspect, they want to prove their value and rationalize their fees by engaging clients in needlessly exotic and complicated looking crazy ass shit that no one else on the gym floor is doing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2012 6:07 PM GMT
    About 3 to 4 months ago, I started back into my lifting routine after having taken several years off.

    I attend the same gym as my housemate. Personally, I tend towards being very easily distracted. For that reason, I don't like it when he talks to me while I am there or when his personal trainer talks to me while I am there. Not because I do not like them, but because I have to focus otherwise I'll get nothing done.

    I don't mind being asked for a spot, but I would be slightly rattled if someone asked to chat about an exercise... once that happens I've lost focus and I, personally, find it challenging to get back into the exercise mindset.

    I found after about two months that I may benefit from increased structure and exposure to other exercises/routines/etc.

    As has been said, many PTs out there have little more than a 16 hour class under their belt. I searched for a PT who had a college degree in exercise kinesiology. I found someone, looked up his uni training (went to the university's website to see what they teach their students), and spoke with the gentleman about his knowledge, training etc... with exercise focused on injury prevention. It has been helpful just to get a bit more advice etc. about some exercises.

    My view was, that I needed find someone with expertise, training, etc... that I can ask... and then give them something for that service. It isn't fair for me to expect someone to give me something without recompense. IMHO.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2012 9:33 PM GMT
    Don't do it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2012 9:52 PM GMT
    If you know the guy at least a little bit, then sure. But not out of the blue.

    I prefer to work out by myself, but every once in awhile I really do enjoy meeting up with friends. That way we can take each other through our routines and shit, so we both end up learning some new exercises, and at the very least I have someone to spot me for the heavier lifts.

    Doubt I classify as a "muscle/gym guy" but I think I know my way around a gym well enough, and that's my two cents!