General fitness advice for someone starting from the ground floor...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 17, 2012 4:47 PM GMT
    I'm thinking Im going to need to do a lot of basic strength training. How can I start off? Are there any exercises, routines, and basic supplements I can start with?
  • jmanorlando

    Posts: 205

    Nov 17, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    Review the workout plans that Rockjock provides it is a great way to start. http://www.realjock.com/article/1164

    If this is your first attempt here are some other things I would do:
    a. Take a before pic, months down the road you will be glad you did
    b. Don't move a mountain on day one, learn the machines, lift movements and get comfortable with form first and then increase from there.
    c. Most likely you won't see a difference after 2 weeks, before you should start to notice small changes after three.
    d. Serious commit to 30 days to form the habit and don't make excuses to skip or pass.
    e. Track progress, this way you see how you are doing. Exercise a, x reps at x weight
    f. If you want to lose weight - get an app like myfitnesspal (it helps)
    g. Watch what you eat and drink - Reduce pizza, burgers, fired foods and high calorie drink. Increase nuts, veggies and natural items.

    Good luck on your quest.
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    Nov 17, 2012 7:19 PM GMT
    My biggest advice to you is find ways to keep motivated in your training because for some people that is the biggest factor to why they stop altogether.

    Change up your routine every 8-10 weeks, and or find different classes which you might like, kickboxing, etc.

    staying motivated will keep your consistently at the gym and be sure to record your progress icon_biggrin.gif
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2603

    Nov 17, 2012 10:01 PM GMT
    Give yourself plenty of rest between workouts.

    Recovery is as important as exercising.
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    Nov 18, 2012 7:36 PM GMT
    Save years of effort and get the greatest result in the least amount of time by emplying proper form, even if it means sacrificing weight. There is no excuse for you (or anyone else on the gym floor, for that matter) to use bad form with all the free YouTube vids by qualified trainers with good reputations demonstrating and/or explaining how to properly perform specific exercises.

    The two biggest detriments to good form is cheating by using momentum to lift a heavier weight (most of you know about that already) and not isolating the muscle the exercise is targeted to work by gripping bars tightly and pushing or pulling through your hands or feet instead of leading (in most cases) with your target muscle followed by your elbow followed by your hands (this is probably new to most of you) and not squeezing the target muscle at the peak of contraction (that part may sound familiar). Some examples to elaborate:

    - For chest exercises squeeze and push with your pecs first (imagine squishing a finger between them), push your elbows second and hands (if at all) third; otherwise, you're working your arms more than your chest on benches and flys.

    - For lat exercises, contract your lats first (imagine squishing a finger between your shoulder blades), pull with your elbows second and your hands third; otherwise you're working your arms more than your lats on pullups, lat pulldowns and rows.

    - For biceps, contract and pull your bicep first, your forearms second and your hands third (when feasible, think of your hands as dead weight); otherwise, depending on the exercise you're working your back more than your biceps.

    - For seated ab crunch machines, contract and pull down with your abs first, elbows second and hands OFF or lightly resting on the handles; otherwise, you're just bowing forward and flinging your chest down - looks mighty impressive, but you're just working your back and bypassing your abs.

    - For leg extensions, try to contract and isolate your quad and keep your feet unengaged as dead weight.

    - For leg curls, don't pull with your feet, try to contract and isolate your hamstrings pulling with THEM followed by your calves and as minimally as possible by your ankles and your dead weight feet.

    And on those two most traditionally female of machines, on which they are unusually proprietary, most females are clueless:

    - Almost every woman on the buttblaster works her hips instead of her glutes because she pushes with her toes instead of her heels, works the lower third of the movement instead of the upper third, and doesn't contract the working glute and relax the non-working one.

    - Almost every woman on the abductor and adductor machines work their hips instead of their thighs and glutes because they push with their feet instead of with their knees. They also rarely even try to perform a wide range of motion. I've learned to keep my feet off of the footpads to ensure I push only with my knees.
  • SuperCell

    Posts: 28

    Nov 19, 2012 1:31 PM GMT
    Great advice so far

    make sure you nail your diet!
    super important, up the cals, plan your days meals.
    More food less " mass shakes"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 19, 2012 3:26 PM GMT
    Rule #1: Have fun.

    Rule #2: Refer to rule #1.

    Because if it's not fun, you're not going to stick with it.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Nov 22, 2012 4:28 AM GMT
    1) You've got to enjoy working out.
    2) Make up a work out schedule (for instance, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, right after work), and stick to it.
    3) Learn proper form (the correct way to do an exercise), to get the most out of your workout, and to avoid injuries.
    4) Start with light weights, then very gradually move up.
    5) Creatine is the only supplement that ever did anything for me. All the protein powder and other miracle supplements are a waste of money.






  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 22, 2012 4:39 AM GMT
    Webster666 said1) You've got to enjoy working out.
    2) Make up a work out schedule (for instance, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, right after work), and stick to it.
    3) Learn proper form (the correct way to do an exercise), to get the most out of your workout, and to avoid injuries.
    4) Start with light weights, then very gradually move up.
    5) Creatine is the only supplement that ever did anything for me. All the protein powder and other miracle supplements are a waste of money.








    Does creatine help with anything other than aesthetics?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 22, 2012 6:16 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidRule #1: Have fun.

    Rule #2: Refer to rule #1.

    Because if it's not fun, you're not going to stick with it.


    This.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2012 12:28 PM GMT
    Everythings said so far is right on the money. Diet is so important - I worked out for a year and has no progress because I wasn't eating enough (quantity and healthy wise). Last 3 months My friend introduced me to his workout system -- my gains have been bigger in that span than it was durin the entire year. (eventually) pushing/challenging yourself to try higher weights is important too-- but never sacrifice form to lift more. The worst feeling in the world is wanting to go to the gym and having to convince yourself not to because of an injury

  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Nov 23, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    Try lose weigth meditation buddy.(You Tube ).. Before I never believe is this meditation or hypnosis stuff. But now I am a firm believer. When you meditate, it will be planted and program in your subconcious mind that your are slim, attractive and no longer overweight.

    Strangely I start to believe and behave like a fit guy that I always wanted to be. I dont like fatty food any more, I eat less, I enjoy exercising, I feel guilty when eating junky food.

    Before you start working on the outside , try work in the inside. Our mind will instruct our body to be what it was told to do (kinda suicide bombing brain washing ). It work for me.. People at work start noticing and asking what do I do and I start to look good..Good luck
  • CanYouKeepUp

    Posts: 92

    Jan 10, 2013 8:34 PM GMT
    If you're a beginner just getting started, you're likely feeling slightly intimidated.

    Any new activity of any type can seem a bit scary at times. Since there are so many different exercises to perform in a weight training program, this only adds to the stress that you're feeling.

    However, if you're equipped with some basic information, you'll be in the position to get going.

    The great news is that as a beginner you will experience results at an accelerated level. You will notice differences in how you feel and look in as little as a few weeks.

    The main points to know.
    1/
    Perfect Proper Form
    First things first - get proper form down pat when you're just starting. Getting off on the wrong foot with form will just lead to incorrect habits. If you're uncertain about any exercises or need guidance on what proper form is for any exercise you are going to attempt to do, book a session with a personal trainer to show you.


    2/
    Focus On Major Lifts First
    Next, you'll want to focus on major lifts first during the workout.
    Any exercise that works more than one muscle group needs to come ahead of those that work on a single group.
    The reason for this being that those exercises are going to take much more energy to complete, therefore you want to be feeling fresh.
    These include the exercises of bench press, squat, deadlift, shoulder press, and bent over row. If you're using machines, they will likely be called leg press, chest press, seated shoulder press, horizontal row, and lateral pull-down.


    3/
    Use A Rep Range Between Eight To Twelve
    Beginners would be best advised to perform somewhere between eight and twelve reps. Since you likely aren't going to be using an extremely heavy load, this will enable you to work in a slightly higher rep range while still seeing significant strength and muscular size and definition improvements.
    Once you get more used to the different weight lifting exercises, then you can bring the rep range lower if you want to really focus on bringing your strength level up.


    4/
    Take At Least One Day Off Between All Workouts
    Another smart tip for all beginners is to aim to take at least one day off between each workout you do. This is going to really help control the degree of soreness you experience as well as helping to prevent you from feeling too overwhelmed with numerous sessions each week.
    A full body workout is typically the best choice for those who are new to weight lifting and it will allow you to hit all the body parts three times a week for optimal results.


    5/
    Don't Forget To Stretch
    Stretching is something that many people, whether beginner or not, leave out from their workout. This is a big mistake however as the stretching is significantly going to decrease the amount of soreness you experience while increasing your range of motion so you're able to benefit more from the lifts you do complete.


    Try to perform ten minutes of stretching after each workout you do, focusing on all the major muscle groups. You can also perform stretching activities on your day off while watching television for instance to further help reduce the amount of soreness you experience.


    6/
    Focus On Eating Before And After The Workout
    What you eat before and after your workout is going to play a big role in how well you perform during that workout and how quickly you recover afterwards.
    While as a beginner it's unlikely that you're going to really start meticulously planning your food intake, making an effort to make sure you're eating foods containing both protein and carbohydrates before and after your workout will go a long way towards helping you get better nutrition.


    7/
    Combine Weight Machine Exercises With A Few Free Weight Movements
    Generally speaking, free weight exercises are superior to weight machine exercises, but for the beginner using weight machines is a nice way to ease into the process of weight lifting, while also helping ensure you are using proper form. To get the best of both worlds, consider combining some free weight exercises with machine exercises.
    Most people can easily learn how to do free weight exercises such as bicep curls, tricep extensions, lateral raises, and so on, but using a leg press machine before jumping into squats, a chest press machine before attempting bench press, and so on can allow you to obtain a greater comfort level while having that machine guidance.


    8/
    Do Your Cardio Training After Your Lifting
    Lastly, another common misconception beginners have is that they should be doing their cardio before they proceed to their lifting. This is actually backwards; cardio should be done after your weight lifting or in another session altogether. This is because of the fact that you want the most energy for your lifting since it's going to primarily depend upon muscle glycogen, while moderate cardio can utilize fat as fuel.
    Doing your weight lifting first also ensures that you can put the most energy into the lifts, increasing the strength gains you realize.