Body Image

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 19, 2012 6:23 PM GMT
    New article in the New York Times highlights the fact that body image problems are not a woman/girl issue alone.

    Muscular Body Image Lures Boys Into Gym, and Obsession

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/health/teenage-boys-worried-about-body-image-take-risks.html?hp&_r=0
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    Nov 19, 2012 8:01 PM GMT
    Really, when I read that trash this morning, I wanted to throttle whoever wrote it and slap his/her editor. A typical example of yellow journalism. It presents a boy who uses protein supplements and misleadingly conflates that with the side effects of steroid use. Repeatedly and deliberately. Also notice how long is the list of just plain stupid retractions and corrections they've already had to attach to the end of the article, as of 0600 this morning.

    The article also implicitly states that weight-training and dietary control are wrong because the only legitimate route to athleticism is genetics.

    I'm sure a few kids are harming themselves through overtraining and misusing supplements. However this article misses the mark entirely. And it's hardly an epidemic. When I happen to drive past the high school, what I see are hordes of shockingly obese kids waddling down the street, sucking on sugar water as they go. That's the epidemic.
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    Nov 19, 2012 10:05 PM GMT
    Meh, just another anti-fit article written by a jealous fatass.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Nov 19, 2012 10:20 PM GMT
    I'm not going to debate the merits of the writer's ability, but the topic can not be so easily dismissed.

    The Adonix Complex or muscle dysmorphia is quite real and indicated in the DSM.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adonis_Complex

    - David icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 19, 2012 11:21 PM GMT
    Actually, there is debate on the nature of "Muscle Dysmorphia" as well as it's "reality".

    And it's not in the DSM. Maybe in DSM V, though that has yet to be determined, since it's not out yet.
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    Nov 19, 2012 11:24 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidReally, when I read that trash this morning, I wanted to throttle whoever wrote it and slap his/her editor. A typical example of yellow journalism. It presents a boy who uses protein supplements and misleadingly conflates that with the side effects of steroid use. Repeatedly and deliberately. Also notice how long is the list of just plain stupid retractions and corrections they've already had to attach to the end of the article, as of 0600 this morning.

    The article also implicitly states that weight-training and dietary control are wrong because the only legitimate route to athleticism is genetics.

    I'm sure a few kids are harming themselves through overtraining and misusing supplements. However this article misses the mark entirely. And it's hardly an epidemic. When I happen to drive past the high school, what I see are hordes of shockingly obese kids waddling down the street, sucking on sugar water as they go. That's the epidemic.


    Amen
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Nov 21, 2012 7:03 AM GMT
    bryanc_74 saidActually, there is debate on the nature of "Muscle Dysmorphia" as well as it's "reality".

    And it's not in the DSM. Maybe in DSM V, though that has yet to be determined, since it's not out yet.


    As I understand it, Muscle Dysmorphia is a subset of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and has been included as it's own separate disorder as far back as the DSM III R (it's been awhile since i have studied abnormal psych, so I am happy to be corrected). I know there are some new considerations for the DSM V.

    Thanks for the clarification.

    - David icon_wink.gif