Starting a business in this political climate

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 19, 2012 8:51 PM GMT
    A few years ago, I was finishing my bachelors and asked the group if it was worth investing in college or jumping the gun and starting a business. The overwhelming feedback was that starting a business is the most rewarding experience that people on this forum have had.

    Further, despite a few never starting college, most have graduated with a 4 year degree which seemed like a good safety net

    So after 3 years of full time salary work, I am burning inside to start a business. I began to look up books on amazon.com on how to do it but reading the reviews, I can't help but feel that no book on there can lend itself good advice on being an entrepreneur.

    So without further ado, if you brilliant and happy business owners are still keeping up with this forum, post some advice some someone who wants to break free of the 9 to 5. If there are good books that have helped, that also would be great !

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 19, 2012 8:53 PM GMT
    Oh yeah, go from 9 to 5, to 24/7.

    What's your business plan?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 19, 2012 9:17 PM GMT
    9 to 5 is a figure of speech, and I agree having a business isn't the beginning of vacation or retirement from your life.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Nov 19, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    As long as you've got a product or a service or a skill that's in demand, you're on your way.
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    Nov 19, 2012 10:44 PM GMT
    "The political climate" doesn't necessarily have anything to do with it. Many of the questions are probably specific to exactly what sort of business you want to start and to where you live. Are you going to do this with your own resources or do you want someone else to pay for it? Is your type of business heavily regulated in your state? Can you get started while still working your day job or will you have to make a big leap?

    Most states will have some sort of information packet for entrepreneurs that will help you figure out if your idea is possible. Sometimes there are so many licenses, bonds, and facility requirements that it's not feasible without deep, deep pockets, or moving to another state.

    But I'm sure all that is covered in the "how to" books. Buy two or three of them, work through the steps, and write up your business plan. Don't buy new copies - there are tons of used ones available for a couple of dollars.