Hiking and mountain biking.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 20, 2012 12:50 AM GMT
    Why not combine the two? I love to do both.

    Buy a really expensive mountain bike (they're VERY light) and carry it over the grounds that are too rough to ride. Ride on the grounds that are smooth, or at least smooth enough to ride over (experience levels may vary).

    Camp out when it's dark, and start again the next day.

    This is what I would call the ultimate "hiking" trip. icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 20, 2012 4:10 AM GMT
    icon_confused.gif Because bicycles aren't allowed on most national forest trails?
    Also 25 or 30 pounds is "really light" for 100 yards, but not so much after five miles, especially when it's a really awkward shape to carry.


    Now if only they'd also ban the commercial horse pack tours...
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    Nov 20, 2012 4:20 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidicon_confused.gif Because bicycles aren't allowed on most national forest trails?
    Also 25 or 30 pounds is "really light" for 100 yards, but not so much after five miles, especially when it's a really awkward shape to carry.


    Now if only they'd also ban the commercial horse pack tours...
    That just means there's work to be done. Hiking and mountain biking are closely related in many aspects.
  • stee99

    Posts: 317

    Nov 20, 2012 6:19 AM GMT
    Great idea but you need to carry all your other gear as well as the bike.
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    Nov 20, 2012 11:38 AM GMT
    stee99 saidGreat idea but you need to carry all your other gear as well as the bike.
    That just makes it more of a challenge.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Nov 20, 2012 12:17 PM GMT
    What I often do is go trail running for an hour or so and then head back to the car to change, eat some power bars and get on my mountain bike for an hour or so. Not quite the same as what Paul proposes, but similar.

    When I'm on a hike over the course of a day or more, I don't want to be lugging my bike along.
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    Nov 20, 2012 1:41 PM GMT
    Paul-

    Just get into cyclo-cross. Its really just biking and..... hiking/running.
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    Nov 20, 2012 9:38 PM GMT
    aspenbutcher saidPaul-

    Just get into cyclo-cross. Its really just biking and..... hiking/running.
    I've actually considered that; and my hybrid bike would be perfect for it. May give it a shot soon.
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    Nov 21, 2012 3:09 PM GMT
    I enjoy the best of both these adventures. !! To combine them would be ultimate. I have thought about this during Summertime, as less gear would be needed. Just some food, water and a hammock !!
    Sometimes I do start a mtn bike ride and have locked it up to hike !!
    I have come up w/great day multi adventures, hike, bike, river rock hop.
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    Nov 24, 2012 5:24 AM GMT
    barehiker saidI enjoy the best of both these adventures. !! To combine them would be ultimate. I have thought about this during Summertime, as less gear would be needed. Just some food, water and a hammock !!
    Sometimes I do start a mtn bike ride and have locked it up to hike !!
    I have come up w/great day multi adventures, hike, bike, river rock hop.
    Two of my coworkers just took three days off this week to go to an 84 mile mountain biking trail in north Florida. They camped out two nights, and hiked some of the trail when they were tired from riding.

    In other words, they stole my idea before I ever got a chance to bring it up to them. Damn them fuckers. icon_lol.gif

  • Jan 30, 2014 2:37 AM GMT
    I have bicycled across the US 20 times.
    There is a mt biking route known as THE GREAT DIVIDE . and it goes from Whitefish, MT. to Pie town, N.M. I think it is nearly or over 2000 miles long and it is largely single track, unimproved roads and very little pavement.
    You MUST hike and bike and push and carry and really have it together as far as outdoor skills go.I have been on sections of the route where it intersects or coincides with other well known and mapped bicycle routes criss crossing this region of the US.
    You can contact an otganization called OUTDOOR ADVENTURE GROUP to purchase maps and they have a magazine that has a "personals section" with people looking for others to join them for bicycle adventures around the World and aive seen many planning to take that trip.
    I think you would love this-especially any section from Montana down to Colorado
    The adventure group can supply you with imformation regarding equipment and its important to make proper choices and be prepared.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14305

    Feb 17, 2014 4:29 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    stee99 saidGreat idea but you need to carry all your other gear as well as the bike.
    That just makes it more of a challenge.
    That is a good, valid point. The only thing is that you are going to be very tired and sore after hiking up a massive mountain carrying a bike when the trails get too rough or too steep.