Lower back pain during squats, deadlifts etc.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 22, 2012 4:24 AM GMT
    Is it normal to have pain in that part of your body after squats, deadlifts and lunges?
  • odietamo

    Posts: 58

    Nov 27, 2012 6:58 AM GMT
    No. Well, depends on the pain. It's normal to feel an ache afterwards, while a sharp or burning pain is not normal and disconcerting.

    I'd suggest stretching and warming up more. I found I still got intense back pain until I started doing Pilates. Then after doing Pilates I found all that back pain kinda disappeared.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 27, 2012 7:00 AM GMT
    Pain? No. Discomfort and fatigue? Yes.
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    Nov 27, 2012 7:13 AM GMT
    Be careful, dude. You don't want to herniate yourself. Definitely stretch and warm up the muscle before using it; that will go a long way in helping prevent any injury.
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    Nov 27, 2012 7:16 AM GMT
    Apex0111 saidBe careful, dude. You don't want to herniate yourself. Definitely stretch and warm up the muscle before using it; that will go a long way in helping prevent any injury.


    Actually the evidence says otherwise.

    Make sure you're not arching your back either in or out too much squatting. You want to keep a more neutral/flat back...so slightly less arched than you would sitting upright perfectly straight. Some stiffness is normal though - your back is baring a lot of weight but it shouldnt be sharp pain.
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    Nov 27, 2012 7:17 AM GMT
    You didn't do a very good job of describing the location, nor type of pain, that you are having.

    Erector spasm is common with squats, deadlifts, or sometimes...even walking.

    You need to work both sides (your back and your abs). You also need to stretch post workout.
    '
    If you have sciatic pain (down your leg) that means you have some compression going on. That's often caused by an imbalance. You can get temporary relief by stretching your low back out on the left press (uncompressing the sciatic). You can go to a chiro, but, too much leads to ligament laxity and does not work on the cause, but, just the symptom.

    A dull ache is pretty normal, especially if you aren't squatting properly and you're putting your low back into overload. Work on your form if that's the case.

    DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness) is pretty common. Light work the area, along with NSAIDS, will make it feel better faster.

    Likely, you're trying to lift too much, in poor form. Make sure you execute in proper form.

    If the pain is chronic, a physical therapist can examine your body mechanics to see what's the underlying cause.
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    Nov 27, 2012 7:18 AM GMT
    Apex0111 saidBe careful, dude. You don't want to herniate yourself. Definitely stretch and warm up the muscle before using it; that will go a long way in helping prevent any injury.


    THIS IS FAULTY ADVICE.

    Never ever, never, stretch a cold muscle, unless you are a highly trained, and conditioned, athlete. To do so is asking for trouble. Always stretch POST-WORKOUT, fully warmed up.

    Best to warm up with low load. Stretching pre workout is not recommended. Save it for the end.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 27, 2012 7:19 AM GMT
    Pain is the brain's way of telling you that something is wrong. Stop what you're doing and find a physiotherapist, not a trainer, to help figure out what's wrong with your technique.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 27, 2012 7:21 AM GMT
    et vous sont belle.
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    Nov 27, 2012 7:22 AM GMT
    WTF do I know, but...

    Ever have disc issues previously? Bulging or leaking discs? If so tread lightly. Have a knowledgeable trainer critique your form and technique. Leg length discrepancy and un-level hips? You don't want to get micro tears going on or further a bulge into nerve impingement. Numb leg or pain radiating down the leg? Hope not.
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    Nov 27, 2012 1:41 PM GMT
    Warm up and check your form. What type of pain are you having?
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    Nov 27, 2012 2:04 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    Apex0111 saidBe careful, dude. You don't want to herniate yourself. Definitely stretch and warm up the muscle before using it; that will go a long way in helping prevent any injury.


    THIS IS FAULTY ADVICE.

    Never ever, never, stretch a cold muscle, unless you are a highly trained, and conditioned, athlete. To do so is asking for trouble. Always stretch POST-WORKOUT, fully warmed up.

    Best to warm up with low load. Stretching pre workout is not recommended. Save it for the end.


    Not faulty just incomplete. I should have said not to perform static stretching. You want to do low intensity movements before any lifting prior to lifting though. There are dynamic stretches you can do that don't fully stretch out a cold muscle like static stretching does. My point was you want to do something prior to a workout to increase blood flow and warm up your muscles.
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    Nov 28, 2012 6:29 PM GMT
    Apex0111 said
    chuckystud said
    Apex0111 saidBe careful, dude. You don't want to herniate yourself. Definitely stretch and warm up the muscle before using it; that will go a long way in helping prevent any injury.


    THIS IS FAULTY ADVICE.

    Never ever, never, stretch a cold muscle, unless you are a highly trained, and conditioned, athlete. To do so is asking for trouble. Always stretch POST-WORKOUT, fully warmed up.

    Best to warm up with low load. Stretching pre workout is not recommended. Save it for the end.


    Not faulty just incomplete. I should have said not to perform static stretching. You want to do low intensity movements before any lifting prior to lifting though. There are dynamic stretches you can do that don't fully stretch out a cold muscle like static stretching does. My point was you want to do something prior to a workout to increase blood flow and warm up your muscles.


    You pretty much nailed it. Warmup + dynamic stretches before workout, Cooldown + Static Stretches after workout
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    Nov 28, 2012 6:39 PM GMT
    Pain in the lower back from squats and deadlifts is often caused by bad form, specifically rounding the back and not keeping your shoulders back. I'd suggest you have someone take a look at your form to make sure you're doing the movements correctly.

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  • bobbyddadd

    Posts: 85

    Nov 28, 2012 6:47 PM GMT
    JumpMan_Josh said
    Apex0111 said
    chuckystud said
    Apex0111 saidBe careful, dude. You don't want to herniate yourself. Definitely stretch and warm up the muscle before using it; that will go a long way in helping prevent any injury.


    THIS IS FAULTY ADVICE.

    Never ever, never, stretch a cold muscle, unless you are a highly trained, and conditioned, athlete. To do so is asking for trouble. Always stretch POST-WORKOUT, fully warmed up.

    Best to warm up with low load. Stretching pre workout is not recommended. Save it for the end.


    Not faulty just incomplete. I should have said not to perform static stretching. You want to do low intensity movements before any lifting prior to lifting though. There are dynamic stretches you can do that don't fully stretch out a cold muscle like static stretching does. My point was you want to do something prior to a workout to increase blood flow and warm up your muscles.


    You pretty much nailed it. Warmup + dynamic stretches before workout, Cooldown + Static Stretches after workout


    I totally agree with above.
    Muscle flexibility is very important when working out. During squats or dead-lifts, make sure your pelvic are in slight anterior tiling.(A tip to remind yourself not to bend over too much or too less to prevent herniating disc.)
    After you done warm up and stretches, you still felt pain while you doing squats or lifting. That means you overload your capacity. Cut back couple pounds and increase gradually.
    "Pain" is a warning sign. Don't just ignore. Adjust a little bit something, maybe weights or posture. Or it will cause the consequence you will never expect.
    The bottom line, working out is for getting healthy or improving body image, not to get hurt.
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    Nov 28, 2012 6:49 PM GMT
    Try watching some videos on proper form when doing squats and dead lifts. They are incredible workouts but extremely dangerous when not done right. I am sure youtube or even RJ has some decent videos.