Challenge: name a fault of the political candidate/party you support

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 09, 2008 3:32 AM GMT
    I think many of us have had the very frustrating experience of getting into a political debate with an overzealous supporter of a different political candidate. For me the worst part is when that person portrays his political candidate of choice as a saint, as if that candidate had no points to critizise. So I wanted to make a challange and see where it goes. Let's see if you can point out one aspect that you dislike/disagree about the political candidate or party that you support. Even small things are fine.

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    Sep 09, 2008 3:35 AM GMT
    I'll go first: I'm for Obama, but I didn't really appreciate it when he called out Palin about her earmarks:



    The thing is he himself had a lot in earmarks:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/14/us/politics/14campaign.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

    I know he's pointing out Palin's inconsisitency between appearing to be anti-earmark and receiving a lot of them, and not so much critizing her for receiving them in the first place but...
    ... his own earmark record kinda weakens his argument.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Sep 09, 2008 5:58 AM GMT
    I am voting Obama as well, and I agree with you about the earmarks thing. I think this has been a pattern for him ever since he abandoned the campaign finance system, spat on the rights of Americans by voting to protect the telecom companies who sold out the privacy of their customers, and so on.

    I am terrified he is going to end up exactly like our current president - unwilling to take responsibility for any position or for any action.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Sep 09, 2008 6:13 AM GMT
    I wish McCain was more polished in his public speaking. He comes off as fidgety and rough around the edges compared to the very polished and, admittedly, impressive public speaking style of Obama. After Bush, it would be nice to have a President that has a bit more polish, because Bush never was one to impress from the podium. That said, I'll take substance over style any day.
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    Sep 09, 2008 6:14 AM GMT
    Obama, voting for the FISA thing. Tsk tsk tsk.
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    Sep 09, 2008 10:07 AM GMT
    Chester A. Arthur---those whiskers, eww. Get a good barber, man!
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    Sep 09, 2008 10:12 AM GMT
    Senator Hillary Clinton - bitch isn't the damned candidate.
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    Sep 09, 2008 5:55 PM GMT
    dowal saidI'll go first: I'm for Obama, but I didn't really appreciate it when he called out Palin about her earmarks:



    The thing is he himself had a lot in earmarks:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/14/us/politics/14campaign.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

    I know he's pointing out Palin's inconsisitency between appearing to be anti-earmark and receiving a lot of them, and not so much critizing her for receiving them in the first place but...
    ... his own earmark record kinda weakens his argument.


    actually Obama has no earmarks this year. Also if you look at obamas ear marks last year it comes to about 25 dollars per person in illinoise as opposed to palins 325 per person in alaska. that is a huge difference
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    Sep 09, 2008 6:02 PM GMT
    Just one?

    American Presidential Election (November 4th):

    Mr. McCain - his support for the continuation of Bush's tax cuts;

    Mr. Obama - he keeps talking about change in his speeches but does not do a good job of detailing what the changes are and how they will impact the USA for the better. I don't think I should have to go to a website to find this stuff out!

    Canadian Federal Election (October 14th):

    Mr. Harper and the Conservatives - very slow in reacting to the problem of global warming;

    Mr. Dion and the Liberals - do not articulate a clear vision except for the environment (which they did little about when in power).
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    Sep 09, 2008 6:08 PM GMT
    Liberals: Choosing Dion as their leader. The man has the charisma of a... uck, out of witty remarks right now. That aside, I'm with Surreal in wanting to hear more out of them than the environment.
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    Sep 09, 2008 6:16 PM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidObama, voting for the FISA thing. Tsk tsk tsk.


    Absolutely. He brushed it off as a non-issue.

    "Given the legitimate threats we face, providing effective intelligence collection tools with appropriate safeguards is too important to delay. So I support the compromise, but do so with a firm pledge that as president, I will carefully monitor the program," Obama said in a statement hours after the House approved the legislation 293-129.

    http://blog.washingtonpost.com/the-trail/2008/06/20/obama_supports_fisa_legislatio.html

    Other than that, he says "um" and stutters too much during interviews, and doesn't rebut McCain/Palin mis-information forcefully enough.
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Sep 09, 2008 6:45 PM GMT
    blink777 saidLiberals: Choosing Dion as their leader.


    Yeah, she's got a nice voice, but I can't stand to look at her on stage. icon_lol.gif (j/k)

    SurrealLife, you would have been proud of Barack if you'd have seen him at the AARP convention. He and McCain were interviewed and Obama was very specific about his positions, while McCain gave rhetoric. I think you can watch it on the AARP website. I saw it on CSpan (I was bored and turned there on a whim). Obama was all substance and style. McCain was just there.

    I do agree with ruck_us though, Obama needs to give stronger rebuttals. Giving people the benefit of the doubt, too often, and thinking they're smarter than they are, causes the polls to be too close.
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    Sep 09, 2008 6:55 PM GMT
    I am voting for Obama, but his achilles heel is that he is intelligent. He should be dumbing down his message, calling names and spewing smug wisecracks, and generally playing to the fears and irrationality of the majority of Americans.

    Apparently this works.
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    Sep 09, 2008 7:00 PM GMT
    I do agree with ruck_us though, Obama needs to give stronger rebuttals. Giving people the benefit of the doubt, too often, and thinking they're smarter than they are, causes the polls to be too close.

    Obama hopefully is not too nice a guy to be a leader. I am always suspicious of leaders I like. The Canadian leader Jean Chretien was a real political streetfighter when it came to elections and parliamentary debate.

    The Clintons are both ruthless. Robert F. Kennedy was supposedly very nasty (according to Gore Vidal who said that John was much nicer). And FDR for all of his very comforting "fireside" chats was very manipulative and calculating. You certainly did not want to cross him, because he would never forget or forgive.

    I will try and find Obama's speech at the AARP convention.
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    Sep 09, 2008 7:05 PM GMT
    XRuggerATX saidI am voting for Obama, but his achilles heel is that he is intelligent. He should be dumbing down his message, calling names and spewing smug wisecracks, and generally playing to the fears and irrationailty of the majority of Americans.

    Apparently this works.


    Exploiting irrational fear is a favourite technique of politicians, tabloid newspapers, TV news programs, etc.. My favourite is "getting tough on crime". Despite all evidence that crime rates are going down in Canada, it seems we can never have enough cops. Another one is exploiting people's insecurities about the economy. For some reason we believe that who the leader is has a tremendous impact on the economy, when so many other factors come into play.
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    Sep 09, 2008 7:53 PM GMT
    Having grown up seeing Ronald Reagan make awesome speeches as our California governor for two terms, and then being fortunate enough to witness all he did for our country for two terms as one of the most popular presidents ever, I can't help but wonder how great it would be if John McCain had the electricity to deliver a speech like President Reagan did. John McCain is not a dynamic speaker. With that being said though, I'm confident a President McCain has what it takes to be one of the most honest, hard working presidents on record.
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    Sep 09, 2008 8:06 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 saidHaving grown up seeing Ronald Reagan make awesome speeches as our California governor for two terms, and then being fortunate enough to witness all he did for our country for two terms as one of the most popular presidents ever, I can't help but wonder how great it would be if John McCain had the electricity to deliver a speech like President Reagan did. John McCain is not a dynamic speaker. With that being said though, I'm confident a President McCain has what it takes to be one of the most honest, hard working presidents on record.


    His honest reputation has been shot. I actually bought it for a little while, but the Palin selection reeks of Bush/Cheney/Big Oil. He's sold out, and his rep suffers badly among all but the thoughtlessly consuming masses (which is enough to win, most likely).
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    Sep 10, 2008 2:05 AM GMT
    I'm disgusted with the dems for not hitting the republicans hard with facts about what they've done to this country, by the war, the mess bush/reagonomics has us in financially, the constitutional issues raised by bush and chronies law breaking, etc. I'm equally disgusted that the dems aren't putting out factual examples of their plans from all fronts so the voters know where Obama stands. He needs to get tough, and give hell back to the McSame camp, he should be keeping McSame on the defense, cause there's plenty of issues to do it with, without stretching the truth at all.