Can Texas go from a Republican state to a Democrat state?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 6:08 PM GMT
    I read this today in the Texas Tribune.

    http://www.texastribune.org/texas-politics/texas-democratic-party/texas-democrats-gained-if-only-little-2012/

    Do you think Texas is in a transition state from going as a Red state to Bue state?

    People who live in Texas, what do y'all think?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 6:24 PM GMT
    sorry typo, from Red state into a Blue state?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 6:42 PM GMT
    Who cares? It will still be Texas. It's like you can bathe a whore, he will still be a whore, just with cleaner skin. Look, Texas has oil and football and everything BBQ, but it's a disgusting, redneck, idiot filled pool of degenerate meatheads and morons. Red/Blue they are all the same. No one cares.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 7:01 PM GMT
    California and New Mexico became blue states in part because of the huge increase in Hispanic populations. That is happening in Texas also, but the state also has a large amount of whites moving from other parts of the country which will make any shift from red to blue much slower.
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3274

    Nov 26, 2012 7:42 PM GMT
    Without much demographic change Texas which was Democratic for 100 years then changed to a red state in the 90's.

    If you make the assumption that people will vote solely on their demographic makeup yes it could change.

    But that ignores the clear fact of why it is currently Red and not blue as it once solidly was.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 8:21 PM GMT
    musclmed saidWithout much demographic change Texas which was Democratic for 100 years then changed to a red state in the 90's.

    If you make the assumption that people will vote solely on their demographic makeup yes it could change.

    But that ignores the clear fact of why it is currently Red and not blue as it once solidly was.

    While people do not vote solely on their demographic makeup, like it or not and whether or not it may be right, demographics do make a difference in election outcomes. About 2/3 of voters under 30 voted for Obama and about 2/3 of single women voted for Obama. About 3/4 of Hispanic voters voted for Obama. About 3/4 of gay and lesbian voters voted for Obama. More than 90% of African American voters voted for Obama and although you might want to say that is because Obama is African American, that number is not that far off from what Kerry or Gore received. More people are staying single. African Americans and Hispanics are growing as a percentage of the population. More gay and lesbians are coming out of the closet and identifying as glbt. If Republicans continue to ignore demographics and leave certain parts of the the population feeling left out of their vision, it is only going to make the future more difficult for Republicans.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 9:03 PM GMT
    Can Texas go from a Republican state to a Democrat state?

    When pigs fly. Texas was long a segregationist State, when Southern Democrats (Dixiecrats) were the racists. But the Republican Party saw the opportunity in the Solid South when Democrat President Lyndon Johnson alienated them with legislation like the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act in the 1960s, which empowered Blacks.

    Since then the southern racists have morphed from Democrats to Republicans. Unless the 2 parties flip-flop again, Texas will remain solidly racist Republican for decades to come. The Latino demographics are a potential factor for change, but so long as Republicans in the Texas State legislature (as in other Red States) can keep playing voter redistricting tricks, Democrat votes will be diluted and ineffective.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 10:44 PM GMT
    @Smartmoney, excuse me sir, I happen to live in Texas and consider myself a Texans even though i'm not a native from the state. Calling Texas, "a disgusting, redneck, idiot filled pool of degenerate meatheads and morons" it's insulting to me. I've lived in Texas for the past 8 years of my life, and I have seen the many sides Texas has. As in every population, you'll find different types of people, and Texas is definitely not the exception. I would really appreciate it if you retract from your statement. Don't be deceived by stereotypes.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 10:50 PM GMT
    Following on Iceblink previous post,

    http://www.thedailydolt.com/2012/11/15/mitt-romney-unwittingly-demonstrates-exactly-why-he-lost-the-election/
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3274

    Nov 26, 2012 11:43 PM GMT
    Iceblink said
    musclmed saidWithout much demographic change Texas which was Democratic for 100 years then changed to a red state in the 90's.

    If you make the assumption that people will vote solely on their demographic makeup yes it could change.

    But that ignores the clear fact of why it is currently Red and not blue as it once solidly was.

    While people do not vote solely on their demographic makeup, like it or not and whether or not it may be right, demographics do make a difference in election outcomes. About 2/3 of voters under 30 voted for Obama and about 2/3 of single women voted for Obama. About 3/4 of Hispanic voters voted for Obama. About 3/4 of gay and lesbian voters voted for Obama. More than 90% of African American voters voted for Obama and although you might want to say that is because Obama is African American, that number is not that far off from what Kerry or Gore received. More people are staying single. African Americans and Hispanics are growing as a percentage of the population. More gay and lesbians are coming out of the closet and identifying as glbt. If Republicans continue to ignore demographics and leaven certain parts of the the population feeling left out of their vision, it is only going to make the future more difficult for Republicans.


    If it were all about demographics how could a solid blue south turn red in a generation?
    Not everyone is concerned with what leaders will "give them". There is just so much to go around. I personally think the less government has to do with our lives the better. And that philosophy in my mind is the fairest .

    Walter92, that insult thrown at Texan's is the typical comment you will here under the breath of liberals. During 2000 and 2004, the talk of "fly over country" abounded at DNC events. Who is more inclusive and part of a vision now?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2012 11:48 PM GMT
    musclmed said
    Iceblink said
    musclmed saidWithout much demographic change Texas which was Democratic for 100 years then changed to a red state in the 90's.

    If you make the assumption that people will vote solely on their demographic makeup yes it could change.

    But that ignores the clear fact of why it is currently Red and not blue as it once solidly was.

    While people do not vote solely on their demographic makeup, like it or not and whether or not it may be right, demographics do make a difference in election outcomes. About 2/3 of voters under 30 voted for Obama and about 2/3 of single women voted for Obama. About 3/4 of Hispanic voters voted for Obama. About 3/4 of gay and lesbian voters voted for Obama. More than 90% of African American voters voted for Obama and although you might want to say that is because Obama is African American, that number is not that far off from what Kerry or Gore received. More people are staying single. African Americans and Hispanics are growing as a percentage of the population. More gay and lesbians are coming out of the closet and identifying as glbt. If Republicans continue to ignore demographics and leaven certain parts of the the population feeling left out of their vision, it is only going to make the future more difficult for Republicans.


    If it were about demographics how could a solid blue south turn red in a generation?
    Not everyone is concerned with what leaders will "give them". There is just so much to go around. I personally think the less government has to do with our lives the better. And that philosophy in my mind is the fairest .


    The two political parties changed. Dixiecrats (as already mentioned in Art_Deco's post above) no longer exist and Republicans are no longer the party of Lincoln.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Nov 26, 2012 11:49 PM GMT
    No Texas will never change from a red, republican state to a blue, democratic state. The narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs consist of too much of the state's electorate. Texas has continued to swing more to the right despite small but vulnerable democratic majorities in its larger cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. One of the reasons I left Texas in 2001 was because of its rapid shift to the right wing along with its unbearably hot, long summers and the rapidly rising cost of living.
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3274

    Nov 26, 2012 11:54 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidNo Texas will never change from a red, republican state to a blue, democratic state. The narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs consist of too much of the state's electorate. Texas has continued to swing more to the right despite small but vulnerable democratic majorities in its larger cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. One of the reasons I left Texas in 2001 was because of its rapid shift to the right wing along with its unbearably hot, long summers and the rapidly rising cost of living.


    exhibit B.

    although they claim to be tolerant and inclusive. I find liberals to be very intolerant and generally loathe anything but there own self image.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2012 12:01 AM GMT
    Walter92 said@Smartmoney, excuse me sir, I happen to live in Texas and consider myself a Texans even though i'm not a native from the state. Calling Texas, "a disgusting, redneck, idiot filled pool of degenerate meatheads and morons" it's insulting to me. I've lived in Texas for the past 8 years of my life, and I have seen the many sides Texas has. As in every population, you'll find different types of people, and Texas is definitely not the exception. I would really appreciate it if you retract from your statement. Don't be deceived by stereotypes.

    Nah, grammar and spelling still mean something outside the backwoods. I stand by everything I wrote.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Nov 27, 2012 12:12 AM GMT
    musclmed said
    roadbikeRob saidNo Texas will never change from a red, republican state to a blue, democratic state. The narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs consist of too much of the state's electorate. Texas has continued to swing more to the right despite small but vulnerable democratic majorities in its larger cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. One of the reasons I left Texas in 2001 was because of its rapid shift to the right wing along with its unbearably hot, long summers and the rapidly rising cost of living.


    exhibit B.

    although they claim to be tolerant and inclusive. I find liberals to be very intolerant and generally loathe anything but there own self image.

    Oh and the narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs on the right wing are very tolerant and acceptingicon_question.gif You must either be blind or living on another planet. It is the fundamentalist lunatics that are always trying to legislate anti gay hate into law, especially the dumb, sunburned, religious hicks from the lone star state. It is these same fundy lunatics that literally demolished the GOP with their backward racist, homophobic, xenophobic, and sexist tirades.
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3274

    Nov 27, 2012 12:14 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    musclmed said
    roadbikeRob saidNo Texas will never change from a red, republican state to a blue, democratic state. The narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs consist of too much of the state's electorate. Texas has continued to swing more to the right despite small but vulnerable democratic majorities in its larger cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. One of the reasons I left Texas in 2001 was because of its rapid shift to the right wing along with its unbearably hot, long summers and the rapidly rising cost of living.


    exhibit B.

    although they claim to be tolerant and inclusive. I find liberals to be very intolerant and generally loathe anything but there own self image.

    Oh and the narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs on the right wing are very tolerant and acceptingicon_question.gif You must either be blind or living on another planet. It is the fundamentalist lunatics that are always trying to legislate anti gay hate into law, especially the dumb, sunburned, religious hicks from the lone star state. It is these same fundy lunatics that literally demolished the GOP with their backward racist, homophobic, xenophobic, and sexist tirades.


    whatever you say.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2012 12:22 AM GMT
    musclmed said
    roadbikeRob saidNo Texas will never change from a red, republican state to a blue, democratic state. The narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs consist of too much of the state's electorate. Texas has continued to swing more to the right despite small but vulnerable democratic majorities in its larger cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. One of the reasons I left Texas in 2001 was because of its rapid shift to the right wing along with its unbearably hot, long summers and the rapidly rising cost of living.


    exhibit B.

    although they claim to be tolerant and inclusive. I find liberals to be very intolerant and generally loathe anything but there own self image.


    Forgive me for not being tolerant of intolerance, but it is intolerance that lost this last election for Republicans. Republicans can keep telling themselves that it was everyone else was looking for a handout, but sooner or later they need to face the fact that there a lot of Hispanic voters out there that are economically conservative, but see so many conservatives against any kind of immigration reform except for "self deportation" and against providing a path to citizenship for their friends and relatives that are already here. Many gays that voted for Obama are also fiscal conservatives, but the Republican party stands against the Employment Nondiscrimination Act and are against marriage equality that would bring personal economic equality for glbt people as married couples. In 2012 there were still Republicans rallying against legislation to help bring equal pay for women. There are economic conservatives who voted for Obama, because when the Republicans view on the economy seems to exclude them and not treat them equally, it is much easier, even in bad economic times, to give greater importance to other issues.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Nov 28, 2012 1:37 AM GMT
    ART_DECO saidCan Texas go from a Republican state to a Democrat state?

    When pigs fly. Texas was long a segregationist State, when Southern Democrats (Dixiecrats) were the racists. But the Republican Party saw the opportunity in the Solid South when Democrat President Lyndon Johnson alienated them with legislation like the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act in the 1960s, which empowered Blacks.

    Since then the southern racists have morphed from Democrats to Republicans. Unless the 2 parties flip-flop again, Texas will remain solidly racist Republican for decades to come. The Latino demographics are a potential factor for change, but so long as Republicans in the Texas State legislature (as in other Red States) can keep playing voter redistricting tricks, Democrat votes will be diluted and ineffective.


    I don't think so....I can see Texas being in play, possibly as a swing state by the 2016 election.

    Your urban areas (Dallas and Houston) are going to trend more Democratic and you'll have reliable Latino votes in the El Paso area. Statewide, you are going to see a larger emphasis on voter registration among Latinos as well.

    Texas is like what Florida used to be, remember? Back in the day, we had dingbat Republican Senator Paula Hawkins, the self-proclaimed "Housewife From Maitland (Orlando suburb) and ineffective Republican governor Bob Martinez. They are gone (literally, Paula Hawkins has since died). Central Florida was reliably Republican and the only Democratic stronghold was Miami-Dade, Palm Beach and Broward Counties. Fast forward here and the I-4 Corridor is safe in Democratic hands and we have high voter turnout among Latinos. Also (and here's something I think will make you smile).....St. Lucie County, north of Palm Beach has gone for Obama twice. That area is new fertile ground for Democrats and the better news is Jacksonville in Duval County is very close to turning blue--give it one more cycle and it will. That puts know-nothing Republican Congressman Ander Crenshaw from that area in peril for 2014. Plus, that could give us more opportunity to have a Democratic majority in our state Congressional delegation.

    We evolved here in Florida and I'm under the belief that in due time, Texas will as well.

    Now if we could do something about Kansas......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 28, 2012 3:39 AM GMT
    turtleneckjock said
    We evolved here in Florida and I'm under the belief that in due time, Texas will as well.

    You provide a detailed & informed look at Florida politics. But its applicability to Texas is speculation. There are too many differences between them, and too many variables, to make the claim "as goes Florida, so goes Texas".
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 28, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    Give it a little time.. with the hispanic population increasing and if it remains as solidly democratic, it will be competitive in a few short years...

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3274

    Nov 28, 2012 4:49 AM GMT
    Iceblink said
    musclmed said
    roadbikeRob saidNo Texas will never change from a red, republican state to a blue, democratic state. The narrow minded, bible thumping screwballs consist of too much of the state's electorate. Texas has continued to swing more to the right despite small but vulnerable democratic majorities in its larger cities like Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. One of the reasons I left Texas in 2001 was because of its rapid shift to the right wing along with its unbearably hot, long summers and the rapidly rising cost of living.


    exhibit B.

    although they claim to be tolerant and inclusive. I find liberals to be very intolerant and generally loathe anything but there own self image.


    Forgive me for not being tolerant of intolerance, but it is intolerance that lost this last election for Republicans. Republicans can keep telling themselves that it was everyone else was looking for a handout, but sooner or later they need to face the fact that there a lot of Hispanic voters out there that are economically conservative, but see so many conservatives against any kind of immigration reform except for "self deportation" and against providing a path to citizenship for their friends and relatives that are already here. Many gays that voted for Obama are also fiscal conservatives, but the Republican party stands against the Employment Nondiscrimination Act and are against marriage equality that would bring personal economic equality for glbt people as married couples. In 2012 there were still Republicans rallying against legislation to help bring equal pay for women. There are economic conservatives who voted for Obama, because when the Republicans view on the economy seems to exclude them and not treat them equally, it is much easier, even in bad economic times, to give greater importance to other issues.


    John McCain was genuinely for immigration reform. As a Senator he used all of his political capital for it. Obama gave lip service to the concept and still won the election. Obama was never held accountable except one Univsion reporter who asked a off script question. And Obama barely used any capital for the concept of immigration. In fact in his 4 years he presided over the most deportations ever. It is if this past election Obama was in the 2008 drivers seat, as a Washington outsider with a clean record.

    If the 2012 Obama was running against the 2008 McCain would Obama then get majority of the Hispanic vote knowing the 2012 facts? Maybe its a lesson to voters who care about comprehensive immigration have to learn the hard way. If Hispanics are voting Democratic I ask then what the hell for ?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 28, 2012 5:06 AM GMT
    musclmed saidJohn McCain was genuinely for immigration reform. As a Senator he used all of his political capital for it. Obama gave lip service to the concept and still won the election. Obama was never held accountable except one Univsion reporter who asked a off script question. And Obama barely used any capital for the concept of immigration. In fact in his 4 years he presided over the most deportations ever. It is if this past election Obama was in the 2008 drivers seat, as a Washington outsider with a clean record.


    Kind of the same line of talk we keep hearing from Republicans and I really hope conservatives keep up this line of thinking I've been hearing since the election of what Obama (the winner of the election) did wrong and what was wrong with the voters who voted for Obama instead of focusing on how they lost election right up until November 2016. Do you think people look at Democrats as the ones who have blocked the Dream Act from passing? No, that blame goes to Republicans. Which by the way, John McCain withheld his vote the last time it was up.

    Say what you want about Obama, he won. Your candidate lost.
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3274

    Nov 28, 2012 5:15 AM GMT
    Iceblink said
    musclmed saidJohn McCain was genuinely for immigration reform. As a Senator he used all of his political capital for it. Obama gave lip service to the concept and still won the election. Obama was never held accountable except one Univsion reporter who asked a off script question. And Obama barely used any capital for the concept of immigration. In fact in his 4 years he presided over the most deportations ever. It is if this past election Obama was in the 2008 drivers seat, as a Washington outsider with a clean record.


    Kind of the same line of talk we keep hearing from Republicans and I really hope conservatives keep up this line of thinking I've been hearing since the election of what Obama (the winner of the election) did wrong and what was wrong with the voters who voted for Obama instead of focusing on how they lost election right up until November 2016. Do you think people look at Democrats as the ones who have blocked the Dream Act from passing? No, that blame goes to Republicans. Which by the way, John McCain withheld his vote the last time it was up.

    Say what you want about Obama, he won. Your candidate lost.


    A lame response if you want to discuss issues.

    You layed down a reason that Hispanics did not vote for Romney because of the "self deportation" verbiage.

    I say that Hispanics are natural democrats if you look historically at voting percentages. Regan passed sweeping amnesty and Bush Sr received 30% of the vote, ( from Texas mind you) .

    Democrats had control of both House and Senate for quite a long time and Carter never lifted a finger for Immigration.

    I do think it is a great idea to link what Obama promised and what he actually accomplished ( unless reality is suspended). It is a new time when a President gets a free because something is "blocked". That is the way are government is designed, COMPRIMISE.

    I think immigration reform is good for the country, not a neeto cool way to win elections. Rather than a look to 2016, a look to 2014 is more appropriate now.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 28, 2012 5:22 AM GMT
    Texas will be a swing state in the near future. Yes we have some crazy right wingers out in the country just like any other state. Young people are flocking to the state, Hispanics are growing in numbers and you can already see a shift.
    The San Antonio mayor was the Keynote Speaker of the National Convention. That itself should tell you something about where Texas is headed.

    I read all these stupid baseless bashes towards my great home state. Get a clue if you think Texas is only full of ignorant, bible thumping bigots. If Texas were so terrible how did we have the first openly gay mayor of a large city? Not San Fran, Not NYC, Not Chicago.

    My state might have some ignorant people living out in the countryside but what state doesn't.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 28, 2012 5:41 AM GMT
    musclmed said
    Iceblink said
    musclmed saidJohn McCain was genuinely for immigration reform. As a Senator he used all of his political capital for it. Obama gave lip service to the concept and still won the election. Obama was never held accountable except one Univsion reporter who asked a off script question. And Obama barely used any capital for the concept of immigration. In fact in his 4 years he presided over the most deportations ever. It is if this past election Obama was in the 2008 drivers seat, as a Washington outsider with a clean record.


    Kind of the same line of talk we keep hearing from Republicans and I really hope conservatives keep up this line of thinking I've been hearing since the election of what Obama (the winner of the election) did wrong and what was wrong with the voters who voted for Obama instead of focusing on how they lost election right up until November 2016. Do you think people look at Democrats as the ones who have blocked the Dream Act from passing? No, that blame goes to Republicans. Which by the way, John McCain withheld his vote the last time it was up.

    Say what you want about Obama, he won. Your candidate lost.


    A lame response if you want to discuss issues.

    You layed down a reason that Hispanics did not vote for Romney because of the "self deportation" verbiage.

    I say that Hispanics are natural democrats if you look historically at voting percentages. Regan passed sweeping amnesty and Bush Sr received 30% of the vote, ( from Texas mind you) .

    Democrats had control of both House and Senate for quite a long time and Carter never lifted a finger for Immigration.

    I do think it is a great idea to link what Obama promised and what he actually accomplished ( unless reality is suspended). It is a new time when a President gets a free because something is "blocked". That is the way are government is designed, COMPRIMISE.

    I think immigration reform is good for the country, not a neeto cool way to win elections. Rather than a look to 2016, a look to 2014 is more appropriate now.


    Okay, if you want to see it as lame, that's fine. But it is the issue in this thread concerning whether or not Texas may someday be a blue state or at least a swing state. That's what this thread is about. And more of what I see in your response is blame Obama and blame the voter for your loss instead of looking at why conservatives and Republicans do not seem to appeal to Hispanic voters and for that matter gay voters, young voters, single women voters. If Republicans can't figure that out then Arizona and Texas are both on their way to becoming blue. Republicans still have a chance in some midterm elections since fewer go out to vote then, which favors them but if they don't change even that will become more difficult. The country will country will continue to become less white, less heterosexual, more single, and younger people that are in a more moderate or liberal mindset for life and if Republicans don't find a way to change their appeal they are going to be left behind.