Paleo Diet vs Blood Type Diet

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 26, 2012 8:52 PM GMT
    I know there are a lot of proponents of the paleo diet here. I also have been told to look at the blood type diet to help with immune systems issues.

    Paleo means, of course lots of meat and vegetables and no grains. However with blood type A, the Blood Type Diet recommends the exact opposite of the paleo diet: go nearly 100% vegetarian with lots of grains.

    If the primary goal is to lean out, should I try Paleo? Anyone with experience with both diets? Recommendations?
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    Nov 27, 2012 3:09 AM GMT
    Both of those are fad diets that aren't created by nutrition professionals (registered dietitians or nutrition PhDs). Blood type isn't evidence-based and is made of pseudoscience. Paleo also has its flaws, which you are welcome to read about in wikipedia--for example, where are you going to get soluble fiber (which lowers cholesterol) if you cut out beans and oats, or where are you going to get calcium if you cut out all calcium-products? Yea, you can supplement, but that's where you end up paying more. Plus, it's not in your best interest to increase red meat intake because it is highly associated in epidemiological studies with increased colon and pancreatic cancers, plus it is higher in saturated fat, which raises LDL cholesterol, even if you pick lean cuts.

    If your primary goal is to lean out, the way to do that is decrease caloric intake. You could eat the same stuff you are eating now but keep it consistently less and lose weight and fat. Just maintain your typical exercise regimen as much as possible. Don't cut too many calories at once or you won't have energy to exercise. -1 lb/week is -500 Calories per day.

    Follow the eating plan for quality of food at choosemyplate.gov if you want something to track your food intake and evaluate it for free. You're ensured you're getting the proper variety with that tool. Unfortunately their database sucks for food entry, so you often have to pick the closest thing in terms of calories for the portion you ate. You could also try tracking your food intake with myfitnesspal.com, which has an excellent food database, but it will not evaluate your diet according to being a healthy distribution like choosemyplate.gov does. Last, feel free to seek out a registered dietitian in your area at eatright.org, assuming you would like more than a website to help you. It's the only nutrition certification that actually requires significant university-schooling in nutrition...not something you pick up off the internet after you pay a fee. Some states require the RD in order to practice nutrition, but some states do not and it is just a capitalistic advantage to advertise yourself as more educated than other practitioners.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 27, 2012 3:12 AM GMT
    Considering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.
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    Nov 27, 2012 3:42 AM GMT
    Medjai saidConsidering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.


    And clearly you have a comment on every diet and exercise thread regardless of any actual formal education in the field.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 27, 2012 3:48 AM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    Medjai saidConsidering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.


    And clearly you have a comment on every diet and exercise thread regardless of any actual formal education in the field.


    I don't need to, in this case. Not that your assumption is correct. I'm a dietetics major, actually.

    Thats beside the point though. The assertions made in his book aren't just unsupported. They're flat out wrong. His timelines for blood type emergence are wrong. his assumption that blood type codes for anything but that is wrong. There's quite the list.

    There are diets I may disagree with, but this one is simply false in every way. It has no scientific foundation, so everything else has nothing to stand on.
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    Nov 27, 2012 3:49 AM GMT
    Cool well you should put in your profile you're a dietetics major rather than absolutely nothing. Obviously I have a bone to pick with everyone being an expert, and it gets frustrating yet I feel compelled to answer these forum posts.
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:04 AM GMT
    The Blood Type Diet is worthwhile. Pick up his book called Live Right for Your Type and just read the case studies.

    Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo does have credentials as a naturopathic doctor:

    Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo

    "D'Adamo's engaging writing style, enthusiasm for his subject and personalized advice will appeal to those who enjoy taking a hands-on approach to their health and exploring new theories."

    --Publisher's Weekly


    "Dr. D'Adamo is the most amazing healer I know. He has the most advanced natural healing methods incorporating age-old techniques in a very thoughtful way. His knowledge on how the body functions is incredible!"

    --Tommy Hilfiger, Fashion Designer

    "With The GenoType Diet Peter D'Adamo is taking it one level past where most of us stop. He has a virtually encyclopedic knowledge of this topic." -

    --Mehmet Oz MD

    Peter J D'Adamo ND is a naturopathic physician noted for his popular books on the Blood Type Diet. His series of books suggest that appropriate diet and lifestyle depend in part on an individual's blood type. An acknowledged expert in naturopathic medicine, Dr. D'Adamo's numerous publications and bestselling books have greatly contributed to our understanding of dietary individuality.

    Dr. D'Adamo is a prolific writer who frequently contributes to the website. Versant in over ten computer languages, he is the author of four major medical software systems and one music composition tool. He hold numerous patents involving nutritional supplementation, cosmetics and fragrance technology.

    A second generation naturopathic doctor, Dr. D'Adamo has been practicing naturopathic medicine for over 20 years. Best known for his research on human blood groups and nutrition, Dr. D'Adamo is also a well-respected researcher in the field of natural products.

    Dr. D'Adamo gained a Naturopathic Doctorate (ND) from Bastyr College, Seattle WA, in 1982, and is licensed as a naturopathic physician in Connecticut, California, British Columbia, Washington, Ontario and Arizona. He has a medical practice in Wilton, Connecticut.

    In 1990 Dr. D'Adamo was awarded Physician of the Year by The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians. He is Adjunct Clinical Professor for both the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine, Tempe AZ, and the National College of Naturopathic Medicine, Portland OR.

    In 2001 Dr. D'Adamo founded the Institute for Human Individuality (IfHI). In 2003 he instigated the first IfHI biannual conference and certification, at which he was the keynote speaker. These conferences, which have attracted the best and brightest minds in nutritional genomics, have continued through 2005, 2007 and 2009.

    The life work of Dr. Peter D'Adamo is the heart and soul behind The D'Adamo Clinic.

    In September 2009, Dr. D'Adamo created and supervises the first Personalized Medicine rotation shift in naturopathic education at the University of Bridgeport.

    With the publication of Eat Right 4 Your Type in 1996, Dr. D'Adamo became known internationally as an author.

    Dr. D'Adamo's series of books are NY Times Bestsellers, and have been translated into over 65 languages. He has been named the Most Intriguing Health Author of 1999, and his first book Eat Right 4 Your Type was voted one of the "Ten Most Influential Health Books of All Time" by industry analysts.

    Publisher's Weekly called his third book, Live Right 4 Your Type "A Comprehensive and fascinating theory.. Meticulously researched."

    In addition to writing and his medical practice, Dr. D'Adamo is an enthusiastic practitioner of martial arts (Tai Chi and Tang Soo Do), woodworking and cabinetry, sailing and vintage Volkswagen restoration.


    See also: Dr. D'Adamo's Science Writings


    http://www.dadamo.com/dadamo.htm
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:10 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidBoth of those are fad diets that aren't created by nutrition professionals (registered dietitians or nutrition PhDs).


    The statement above can be explained further, given:

    Dr. D'Adamo gained a Naturopathic Doctorate (ND) from Bastyr College, Seattle WA, in 1982, and is licensed as a naturopathic physician in Connecticut, California, British Columbia, Washington, Ontario and Arizona. He has a medical practice in Wilton, Connecticut.

    Bluey2223, since Dr. D'Adamo has the above credential, feel free to let us know how doctors in nutrition disagree with doctors of naturopathic.
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:14 AM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    Medjai saidConsidering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.


    And clearly you have a comment on every diet and exercise thread regardless of any actual formal education in the field.




    The problem is the education. We are a dangerously overweight and sick country because the formal knowledge base is wrong. The Food pyramid is devised to keep big Ag happy. It's killing us.

    If you want to truly be scientific then try Paleo or the blood type diet for one month and journal your statistics every week. That is the scientific method not reading monsanto funded research papers. The head neurologist at Standford used to tell me that exercise was bad for you and if pressed he could show you the research to support that point. Now thats an "education"
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:18 AM GMT
    Alpha13 said
    [...]
    The problem is the education. We are a dangerously overweight and sick country because the formal knowledge base is wrong. The Food pyramid is devised to keep big Ag happy. It's killing us.[...]


    People are just stupid. I've seen such people eat on the subway and what they buy in the supermarket. They just stuff their mouths with crap I would never think of buying or eating.
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:20 AM GMT
    Alpha13 said
    bluey2223 said
    Medjai saidConsidering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.


    And clearly you have a comment on every diet and exercise thread regardless of any actual formal education in the field.




    The problem is the education. We are a dangerously overweight and sick country because the formal knowledge base is wrong. The Food pyramid is devised to keep big Ag happy. It's killing us.

    If you want to truly be scientific then try Paleo or the blood type diet for one month and journal your statistics every week. That is the scientific method not reading monsanto funded research papers. The head neurologist at Standford used to tell me that exercise was bad for you and if pressed he could show you the research to support that point. Now thats an "education"


    Actually, an "education" gives you the ability to critically examine research and see where it's flawed. If your point is that irresponsible use of statistics and science can mislead people, congratulations on stating the obvious.
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:23 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]Medjai said[/cite]Considering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.[/qu


    An you have arrived at this conclusion by reading what someone else wrote about someone else 's option about it.

    Be your own man and your own expert about your own body. Try these things out yourself for first hand knowledge rather than running around repeating, "Man will never fly", because that is the official party line.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 27, 2012 4:31 AM GMT
    Alpha13 said[quote][cite]Medjai said[/cite]Considering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.[/qu


    An you have arrived at this conclusion by reading what someone else wrote about someone else 's option about it.

    Be your own man and your own expert about your own body. Try these things out yourself for first hand knowledge rather than running around repeating, "Man will never fly", because that is the official party line.


    His entire foundation is wrong. Blatantly wrong. As such, whatever he's based the remainder on is also inherently faulty.

    In reference to your other post, I agree the system s faulty. That's why I'll never become a registered dietitian, because I strongly disagree with the Canada Food Guide. But this? This isn't even science. It's tantamount to those old miracle serums people would sell to the desperate centuries ago.
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:35 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    Alpha13 said[quote][cite]Medjai said[/cite]Considering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.[/qu


    An you have arrived at this conclusion by reading what someone else wrote about someone else 's option about it.

    Be your own man and your own expert about your own body. Try these things out yourself for first hand knowledge rather than running around repeating, "Man will never fly", because that is the official party line.


    His entire foundation is wrong. Blatantly wrong. As such, whatever he's based the remainder on is also inherently faulty.

    In reference to your other post, I agree the system s faulty. That's why I'll never become a registered dietitian, because I strongly disagree with the Canada Food Guide. But this? This isn't even science. It's tantamount to those old miracle serums people would sell to the desperate centuries ago.


    Why does disagreeing with the food guide prevent you from becoming a registered dietician?
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Nov 27, 2012 4:38 AM GMT
    uoft23 said
    Medjai said
    Alpha13 said[quote][cite]Medjai said[/cite]Considering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.[/qu


    An you have arrived at this conclusion by reading what someone else wrote about someone else 's option about it.

    Be your own man and your own expert about your own body. Try these things out yourself for first hand knowledge rather than running around repeating, "Man will never fly", because that is the official party line.


    His entire foundation is wrong. Blatantly wrong. As such, whatever he's based the remainder on is also inherently faulty.

    In reference to your other post, I agree the system s faulty. That's why I'll never become a registered dietitian, because I strongly disagree with the Canada Food Guide. But this? This isn't even science. It's tantamount to those old miracle serums people would sell to the desperate centuries ago.


    Why does disagreeing with the food guide prevent you from becoming a registered dietician?


    In Canada, to be a registered dietitian, you need to support the food guide. At east you need to say you will.
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:40 AM GMT
    Wow, that seems odd to me. Whats the point of training someone if your expectation is that they ignore their own judgement and parrot literature. Maybe other provinces don't have such absurd rules?
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    Nov 27, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    uoft23 said
    Alpha13 said
    bluey2223 said
    Medjai saidConsidering the blood type diet is the biggest load of hokum I've ever read I'd recommend against it.


    And clearly you have a comment on every diet and exercise thread regardless of any actual formal education in the field.




    The problem is the education. We are a dangerously overweight and sick country because the formal knowledge base is wrong. The Food pyramid is devised to keep big Ag happy. It's killing us.

    If you want to truly be scientific then try Paleo or the blood type diet for one month and journal your statistics every week. That is the scientific method not reading monsanto funded research papers. The head neurologist at Standford used to tell me that exercise was bad for you and if pressed he could show you the research to support that point. Now thats an "education"


    Actually, an "education" gives you the ability to critically examine research and see where it's flawed. If your point is that irresponsible use of statistics and science can mislead people, congratulations on stating the obvious.



    No, that is called being biased since to critically examine is the same as to be judgmental therefore the issue of the "Schools of Thought" or professional bias. One can partially step out of those traps through empirical method.
  • Medjai

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    Nov 27, 2012 4:48 AM GMT
    uoft23 saidWow, that seems odd to me. Whats the point of training someone if your expectation is that they ignore their own judgement and parrot literature. Maybe other provinces don't have such absurd rules?


    This is Canada wide.

    Being registered pays better, has better benefits, and more job security. And some people really do support the food guide.

    Alpha13 said
    No, that is called being biased since to critically examine is the same as to be judgmental therefore the issue of the "Schools of Thought" or professional bias. One can partially step out of those traps through empirical method.


    I'm sorry, but that made zero sense. I don't know if I agree or not, because I'm really not following.

    For the record, I don't just guess or listen to my professors for my opinion. I base mine off peer reviewed research. That's the only reliable source for me.
  • calibro

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    Nov 27, 2012 5:01 AM GMT
    now seating stupid, party of 2.
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    Nov 27, 2012 5:01 AM GMT
    Are you sure? because the medical colleges in Canada are provincially mandated. The federal government has no authority over them and each province decides what a profession's scope of practice is.

    I find this interesting as a nursing student and I'm really confused by this having to agree with the food guide thing. I can't find anything on google about it. I did find the College of Dietitians of Ontario's application for registration and its nearly identical to the College of Nurses of Ontario in that all the questions are about your ethical, criminal, and educational competencies - nothing so specific as what you do or do not agree with.

    Sorry for all the questions but I'm curious about this because if its true its absolutely absurd and I'd like to find an explanation.
  • Medjai

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    Nov 27, 2012 5:05 AM GMT
    uoft23 saidAre you sure? because the medical colleges in Canada are provincially mandated. The federal government has no authority over them and each province decides what a profession's scope of practice is.

    I find this interesting as a nursing student and I'm really confused by this having to agree with the food guide thing. I can't find anything on google about it. I did find the College of Dietitians of Ontario's application for registration and its nearly identical to the College of Nurses of Ontario in that all the questions are about your ethical, criminal, and educational competencies - nothing so specific as what you do or do not agree with.

    Sorry for all the questions but I'm curious about this because if its true its absolutely absurd and I'd like to find an explanation.


    Honestly, I could find very little myself. However, this has come from several instructors I've had that were registered before they became professors. I could ask them at some point to clarify, but as it stands, that's all I've got.
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    Nov 27, 2012 5:07 AM GMT
    ya you should definitely ask for clarification before giving up on it, especially if you've already spent the time to get the degree. Again, I don't know about BC, but in Ontario its illegal to practice at all if you're not registered with the college.
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    Nov 27, 2012 5:07 AM GMT
    It is myopic to think that RDs blindly follow the food guide pyramid. That was 2 models ago. We have had MyPyramid and now MyPlate since, which are BASIC guides to give people who don't know much about nutrition a means to plan their meals.

    Please forgive older RDs who don't have the science-based and evidence-based and research-based education we now have. Older MDs used to not have the science based education newer MDs have. As times have changed, allopathic medicine has become more evidence-based to differentiate from the quackery that is naturopathic. For example, RDs used to think that too much protein was harmful to the kidneys, but now there is evidence that shows that the hyperfiltration that occurs in kidneys is a normal physiologic response. Theoretically, the previous thought was valid, but evidence-wise it is no longer that. If people are still blaming RDs because eggs went bad, then good, then bad, then good, etc. and the food guide pyramid wasn't your cup of tea for whatever reason, the profession has changed its curriculum and practice.

    Furthermore, the dietary guidelines, which are a LONG document if you care to read, are well-researched by people who know more than you and me. RDs are trained to understand what was written and translate it to the public. But if you'd rather bury your head in the sand because 30 years ago the profession wasn't as science-based as it is now, then live in your hole.

    Also keep in mind that we have a Canadian dietetics student and an American graduate and current dietetic intern speaking. I honestly don't know what Canada does and would be interested in reading up on whatever you disagree with. Is Canada part of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the largest network of food and nutrition professionals that puts out the RD credential in America? AND has like 80,000 members. No other nutrition credential out there has the rigorous requirements or member base. You cannot get an institutional job without an RD, but you can go into business/private practice with any certification you print out on the internet, such as the CCN, the CNS, the CN, etc. Look up their membership bases...it's laughable. It's created by people who didn't want to go back to school for the RD and would rather take a shortcut.
  • Medjai

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    Nov 27, 2012 5:10 AM GMT
    uoft23 saidya you should definitely ask for clarification before giving up on it, especially if you've already spent the time to get the degree. Again, I don't know about BC, but in Ontario its illegal to practice at all if you're not registered with the college.


    You can't call yourself an RD, but the term nutritionist is unlegislated. Unfortunately, a lot of idiots use the term.

    Here's the website for the Canadian oversight board, if you're interested.

    http://www.dietitians.ca/
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    Nov 27, 2012 5:18 AM GMT
    WHERE can i get more details about this Blood type diet thingy...??

    does any of you has it, can anyone share it with me ???


    tanx