Recently quit drinking, but have questions

  • JuneauMike

    Posts: 326

    Nov 27, 2012 9:17 PM GMT
    I recently quit drinking. Please understand I don't have a problem with anyone else who drinks, but it had become unmanageable for *me*.

    I want to transition into a more active lifestyle. Who here has experience with this, and could give me advice? Thanks in advance!
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Nov 27, 2012 9:23 PM GMT
    I don't personally have experience with it, but an ex did. You definitely chose the right venue of an active lifestyle, he always said that was the best decision. Aside from focusing as much energy as possible into fitness, also tell friends and family about what you're doing so that they can steer you in the right direction. Sometimes just knowing that others will be disappointed if you mess up is enough to keep you on track.
  • JuneauMike

    Posts: 326

    Nov 27, 2012 9:37 PM GMT
    kevmoran saidI don't personally have experience with it, but an ex did. You definitely chose the right venue of an active lifestyle, he always said that was the best decision. Aside from focusing as much energy as possible into fitness, also tell friends and family about what you're doing so that they can steer you in the right direction. Sometimes just knowing that others will be disappointed if you mess up is enough to keep you on track.


    Thank you, Kevmoran! I actually did go the, "I quit drinking, help me get there, guys!" route. But 95% of this is on me. A FB friend told me about a program called "Rational Recovery" which I am looking into, also.

    Thanks again!
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Nov 27, 2012 11:37 PM GMT
    JuneauMike saidI recently quit drinking. Please understand I don't have a problem with anyone else who drinks, but it had become unmanageable for *me*.!


    It is like you are apologizing to drinkers for having to quit. I don't get it?
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    Nov 27, 2012 11:56 PM GMT
    I go through my sober phases just to keep myself in check. I am in one right now. For me the key is that I don't avoid alcohol. Otherwise its just constantly in your decision making. Like avoiding going to events, parties, clubs with my friends just cuz you think you might slip up and start drinking. That leads you to miss out of stuff you actually like to do ie. hanging out with your friends just because of the fear of alcohol.

    I still do everything i like to do. But i simply make it clear to anyone i'm going to be hanging out with if possible in advance or at the event that I AM NOT DRINKING. It isn't that hard and most people are supportive. Some might still try to get you to slip up. The key then is just to let them know firmly that you can have fun without drinking and they should not try to offer it again.

    Like a wise stan said: you need deciprin! deciprin come from within icon_biggrin.gif

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    Nov 28, 2012 6:59 PM GMT
    I just had 3 neighbors die from alcoholism. The warning signs was loss of weight and throwing up blood. 3 guys died within a week of Thanksgiving. The lady that owns the house has a bar so she would take care of these types of people. I quite don't understand alcoholism myself. I drink a glass of wine or one beer a day maybe every other day. I don't understand why I would need to drink more?

    Some people who quit drinking start smoking pot more. I would think that is an option. Good luck to you. If you can manage alcohol maybe a drink every so often? Isn't that possible? And have you gone to counseling?
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    Nov 28, 2012 7:05 PM GMT
    I think a lot has to do with your routines and habits. Make sure you start replacing the time that you'd normally have a drink with something else that you enjoy doing. The temptation to go back to your old ways is strongest when you're idle.

    I also think it's important to have a positive mindset. There's a difference between saying "I quit drinking" and saying "I don't drink."

    Oh, and most importantly, congratulations bud for taking such a big step toward being more healthy. Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 28, 2012 7:13 PM GMT
    Just remember there's a difference between not drinking and being sober. It's incomprehensible that you will get to the latter alone.

    I watch people die quite often from alcohol; this is not a moral issue.

    Assuming you're an alcoholic, the love affair between the alcoholic and his alcohol is far stronger than any other relationship. The same man will drink again.

    If you don't want to drink, take advice from people not getting drunk everyday. I wish you luck.
  • JuneauMike

    Posts: 326

    Nov 28, 2012 9:18 PM GMT
    deltalimen saidJust remember there's a difference between not drinking and being sober. It's incomprehensible that you will get to the latter alone.

    I watch people die quite often from alcohol; this is not a moral issue.

    Assuming you're an alcoholic, the love affair between the alcoholic and his alcohol is far stronger than any other relationship. The same man will drink again.

    If you don't want to drink, take advice from people not getting drunk everyday. I wish you luck.


    There were several great replies, yours among them! In the short time since I quit, I have become more active.

    When I've quit before, I never really discussed it. And I failed. This time, I'm looking for advice, and just taking it one day at a time!

    Thanks again for your great advice!
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    Dec 24, 2012 1:35 AM GMT
    I'm not sure what you're really asking, but I suspect you're wondering how you can replace drinking with other activities, to keep from relapsing. Most of the medical treatment around stopping alcohol deals with managing withdrawal symptoms, which it sounds like you've passed already.

    To maintain sobriety, the most success is found by combining psychiatric therapy and medication. More than 70% of people relapse with therapy alone, so it's important to go all out your first time to give yourself your best chance. Therapy can be 1 on 1 with a psychiatrist, but most people do this through a support group, like Alcoholics Anonymous. Medications like naltrexone and acamprosate block the high you get from alcohol, and disulfiram makes you sick when you drink.

    I really takes a lot of effort to pull yourself out of an alcohol abuse cycle, and it's pretty impressive.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Dec 24, 2012 1:39 AM GMT
    don't go to frat parties
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Dec 24, 2012 1:41 AM GMT
    Surround yourself with love and support. If it means making new friends then that is what you have to do. If you haven't already, face the reality that it will be a day to day battle that you can control. If you can put yourself around people who care about you and want to see you succeed in your sobriety then you will be setting yourself up for success.
  • sk8rdom

    Posts: 22

    Dec 27, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    Well as of Jan 24 of 2013 will be 14 years for me with out drinking. Staying sober for me is high on my list of things I do to keep a healthy, happy, active life. While I was a fun guy to be around when drinking, there is an old sayinbg....."alcohol gave me wings to fly, then it took away my sky". Its a long slow process but worth every second of it. shoot me an email if youd like to know more.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 6:55 PM GMT
    JuneauMike said
    When I've quit before, I never really discussed it. And I failed. This time, I'm looking for advice, and just taking it one day at a time!

    Not quite sure what you're looking for. I greatly restricted myself when I realized alcohol was hurting my physical performance, at a time when that was vital to my military career. Career advancement & promotion were more important to me than a martini. I simply prioritized, and had my cocktails on weekends only, if then.

    If that kind of self discipline won't work for you, then you may have an issue that requires some outside assistance to resolve. Nothing wrong with that. Do whatever it takes to get the job done.
  • JuneauMike

    Posts: 326

    Jan 11, 2013 2:08 AM GMT
    6 weeks and 2 days now, I guess I'm doin alright! icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 11, 2013 2:25 AM GMT
    JuneauMike said6 weeks and 2 days now, I guess I'm doin alright! icon_smile.gif

    You are indeed doing all right, and kudos!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 3:52 AM GMT
    Would you describe yourself as an alcoholic or someone who has decided drinking isn't enjoyable?

    AA meetings are good, despite the religious bits. You'd probably get something good from them.

    There could be a local phone number you could call to ask what services are available to you, and you could pick something that's appropriate for the level of support you need.

    Alternatively a social worker will be hooked up with all of the local services, as well as training on working through the transition.

    You are most welcome to keep posting on RJ, or a forum made of people who "gotta kick this habit!".

    Keep in mind, it's better to be safely over-supported than under-supported.

    Good work with your start on being booze-free and keep it up!