The Philadelphia Experiment (Project Rainbow) Time travel, cloaking ships

  • reikiman

    Posts: 20

    Nov 29, 2012 1:49 AM GMT
    A movie was produced about Project Rainbow or commonly known as the Philadelphia Experiment. Initially technology was developed by the government for war purposes. What happened was that the technology experimented with went alot further than expected and opened a time portal inwhich a battleship was pulled into along with its crew. The movie is Philadelphia Experiment is lable Sci Fi, but its based on reality and what happened with a few things added for drama purposes.
    So even in the early part of the 1900's this technology existed with a lot going on in the 1940's up to present. Mantauk in New York was part of this scenario. Its all fascinating and many Youtube videos can be found on the web. Whats in the news now is replicator technologies like on Star Trek. What we see is in the early stages, however the government also is light years ahead in the same technology but we the public don't get it until they the governments are ready to release it to us. Check it out folks and you will be amazed at what is available on the internet, but please use your own discernment.
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    Nov 29, 2012 4:22 AM GMT
    And it is the origin story to Command and Conquer so that's a plus.
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    Nov 29, 2012 4:42 AM GMT
    For what it's worth, I worked in "secret" government labs for a lot of years. What actually happens is that there are so many layers of management that even something like changing a light bulb costs about $40,000. Actual scientific research is impossible. So for, say, a $2 million research project, they cut a check to some state university for about $50K to do the actual research, and the rest goes to shuffling paper around the lab bureaucracy, attending meetings, and issuing press releases to claim credit for whatever the kids over at the university did. Then they classify the whole thing to cover up the fraud and waste.

    The guys down at the other end of my hallway spent about $10 million writing a software program to work with DNA sequences. It required a $200,000 computer to run it. But by the time they finished, there was a shareware for $50 that ran on a mac that was ten times as good. icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif

    The only magic tricks you can expect from the government labs is making billions of dollars disappear.
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    Nov 29, 2012 4:46 AM GMT
    mindgarden said
    The only magic tricks you can expect from the government labs is making billions of dollars disappear.


    David Copperfield for Chairman of Committee on Science, Space, and Technology!
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    Nov 29, 2012 4:56 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidFor what it's worth, I worked in "secret" government labs for a lot of years. What actually happens is that there are so many layers of management that even something like changing a light bulb costs about $40,000. Actual scientific research is impossible.


    This is why we can't advance quickly enough or have nice things

    And speaking of $40,000 lightbulbs, how exactly is that sum spent? Is there several departments in charge of twisting, wiping and flicking the on-off switch? icon_razz.gif
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    Nov 29, 2012 4:58 AM GMT
    ArtsyRunner said
    mindgarden saidFor what it's worth, I worked in "secret" government labs for a lot of years. What actually happens is that there are so many layers of management that even something like changing a light bulb costs about $40,000. Actual scientific research is impossible.


    This is why we can't advance quickly enough or have nice things

    And speaking of $40,000 lightbulbs, how exactly is that sum spent? Is there several departments in charge of twisting, wiping and flicking the on-off switch? icon_razz.gif


    Maybe $40,000 is the wages for all the bureaucrats it takes to screw in a light bulb?
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    Nov 29, 2012 5:19 AM GMT
    I try not to think about those years. But typically, when enough bulbs burned out in my lab that it got hard to see, I would write out a maintenance request. that would get reviewed by my boss and if approved, go up the chain of command. Seven levels of review in my management tree. Then it would go over to facilities. A few months later, someone from facilities would poke his head into my lab and look around for a minute, then he would write up an engineering review request. Eventually, a project engineer would write up a report about the lighting in my lab (by now I would have smuggled some bulbs in from home and changed the damned thing months ago - of course if I got caught, I'd be fired and there would be headlines about "environmental violations") and basically recommend re-wiring the whole room because whatever bulb was installed last time was no longer approved for use. But wait. Lightbulbs are hazardous waste. We need a plan to dispose of them, if in fact they get changed. That has to go back up and down the management tree, AND has to be approved by the state department of ecology and the EPA. That could take another two years. Next, the crafts unions get involved. Does the janitorial staff get to change the lightbulb, or do we need an electrician? Well, if they change the fixture, that could take a carpenter to wield the screwdriver. Or should it be a machinist?

    About two years after my request, a rigger would show up with a ladder. Three guys in white hardhats with clipboards would watch him set up the ladder and take notes. Then they'd all leave. The next day, a janitor would come in, climb the ladder, again with three guys in white hats watching and taking notes, and remove the lightbulb. The next day, an electrician would come by and turn off the light switch (scheduling error) again with three guys in white hats. well... you see the pattern.