defining the body building life style

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 29, 2012 10:05 PM GMT
    came across this interesting blog

    http://www.ironmanmagazine.com/blogs/john/

    about how when you body build you start off just wanting to look better but it becomes a different way of defining how you see the world and how your approach to every decision changes in a similar way to how martial arts can


    anyway thought I'd share icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 29, 2012 11:28 PM GMT
    It's no different than any other hobby. Some people try it once and get hooked, then start dumping time and money into it. Some people try it once and never do it again.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 30, 2012 2:47 AM GMT
    I agree with Paul. It is more like a hobby and some people get more into it than others. I enjoy the gym myself.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 30, 2012 4:10 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidIt's no different than any other hobby. Some people try it once and get hooked, then start dumping time and money into it. Some people try it once and never do it again.


    totally agreed !! the hobby of self realization and achievement icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 30, 2012 4:23 AM GMT
    It's a hobby when it fill up your free time, and it's a lifestyle when everything you do is weighted with your training requirements.

  • Skyboundbull

    Posts: 21

    Nov 30, 2012 4:26 AM GMT
    Yea... Bodybuilding is more than a hobby.
  • Hunkymonkey

    Posts: 215

    Nov 30, 2012 4:27 AM GMT
    It depends what you want out of bodybuilding. Are you recreational or will you compete? Either way, but more so recreationally, you can do it in a healthy way, as far as intent, eating, sleeping, interacting with people. Without a doubt, it can lead to better self-image - which is, as the article pointed out, why we started. But it does take effort. I know a lot of pro and high level amateur bodybuilders and they tend to be self-focused, sometimes in a balanced way, more often not. Then again, I know a bunch of muscle queens and they can get pretty narcisistic (compared with self-focused) and neurotic about training and the whole bb "lifestyle". Even when they know they are doing it to get sex or modeling or acting (porn icon_razz.gif) jobs. The key is a balanced life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 30, 2012 5:15 AM GMT
    I think this is really interesting and apropos for me right now. For me, my time at the gym definitely started out just trying to look passable. Then it became trying to looking good. Then it became trying to look better than you (whomever you are), which was really pretty unhealthy as I was constantly comparing myself to other people and focusing on my perceived inadequacies rather than what I was doing well. I stopped this when I got into bodybuilding. Instead of wanting to be in competition with everyone around me, my biggest competitor is myself. Training has gone from something that I do 3-4 times a week to something that I base almost all of my life decisions on. Instead of asking myself if my abs are better than yours, I ask myself things like, do I have the discipline to eat a clean 3800 calories every day? Can I train six days a week even when I'm traveling for work? Am I willing to skip drinks when I'm out with my friends so that I won't compromise my workout the next day?

    The guys posting about it being like any other hobby aren't in the same place as me. Admittedly, it's kind of a lonely existence. I find I relate less and less to the everyday gym rats at my gym and more to the big guys that compete. My friends think I'm a little crazy, but ultimately this is probably the most transformative (literally) and rewarding thing I've done. The author of the blog talks about how martial arts can be a spiritual journey and how bodybuilding can transform your body and your mind; for me it's all of these things. When it is just me and the iron, nothing else matters in the world. It's my moment of zen even when I have to pull myself up from the leg press because my quads are too fried to support my weight.

    I'm competing for the first time in the spring. I just got done bulking and gained close to 35 pounds and now I'm getting ready to diet down and get into better condition than I've ever been in before. I try to strike a balance with my work, my friends, my hobbies (and bodybuilding is way beyond a hobby at this point) and my family, but this is how I define my life right now. I'm doing what I love and it is all-encompassing.

    A little crazy, I know.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 30, 2012 5:30 AM GMT
    Nice article. I think, like paulflexes is implying, anyone can relate to the feelings even if they aren't a bodybuilder.

    Obsession: a fixation on a single idea, thought, or desire.

    I think most of us here have something in our lives that we obsess over (in my case, rock climbing) that drives us to spend time, money, energy, etc. to better ourselves at that particular activity.

    The important thing to remember is obsession can lead to some unhealthy behaviors. Like, HunkyMonkey said "The key is a balanced life." Don't let your obsession cross that fine line into addiction.

    It's pretty obvious John Balik is talking about the healthy side and the benefits of leading the "Bodybuilder Lifestyle".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 30, 2012 6:04 AM GMT
    Given the lateness of the hour (NOT a night person here) I just skimmed the article, maybe too quickly to be weighing in here, but I think the point is that bodybuilding, like martial arts, requires dedication and focus (proper form being paramount), and the development of these skills through either (athletic) venue spills into other areas of one's life making one a better balanced individual - and in that way it's transformative of mind and spirit as well as body.
  • Hunkymonkey

    Posts: 215

    Nov 30, 2012 10:57 PM GMT
    That's a great point. For me, training has taught me discipline and focus.
  • rugbyjockca

    Posts: 84

    Dec 03, 2012 2:14 PM GMT
    I'm at the very beginning of my bodybuilding journey - I've always been interested in muscle growth in general, but it's only been in the last year that I've been dedicated to getting to the gym consistently, and now I've set myself a goal of being competition-ready (whether or not I ever compete) in 4 years.

    I'm totally on the "it's a lifestyle" side, because for me it has to be. I'm a recovering alcoholic (14 months sober now), and getting and staying fit are major building blocks in staying sober for me. Maybe some guys are able to treat bodybuilding as a hobby, but for me I know that I have to pay careful attention to everything I do if I'm going to reach my goals.

    Thanks for posting that blog, because I want to learn everything I can about bodybuilding as a lifestyle. I know that if I can accomplish this, I'll be able to take on anything I set my mind on.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 23, 2012 5:50 AM GMT
    Hunkymonkey saidThat's a great point. For me, training has taught me discipline and focus.


    I agree. The focus to a goal helps me a lot. Its the benefit of seeing your goal after you spent so much time and worked so hard for it. I am looking for a balanced life. Not interested in competing, its a personal transformation.

    I've been interested in muscle growth for a long time. Then it was a decision to go with it. I believe it can give you confidence and self assurance. However, it can easily go in the obsessive and addictive realm.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 23, 2012 7:04 PM GMT
    " get into better condition than I've ever been in before. I try to strike a balance with my work, my friends, my hobbies (and bodybuilding is way beyond a hobby at this point) and my family, but this is how I define my life right now. I'm doing what I love and it is all-encompassing.

    A little crazy, I know."

    SF79, not crazy. INSPIRATIONAL. Thank You.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 24, 2012 7:42 AM GMT
    definitely lifestyle even for lightweight bodybuilders like me. Help cut down my alcohol to only 1 or 2 beers max per day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 26, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    I think it depends a great deal as to what level you intend to take lifting. I would be hesitant to call casual lifting and healthy eating BBing. Be it just to get in shape, or look better then your friends, I would classify this as a lifestyle choice and hobby. To me it only becomes BBing when it stops being about getting in shape, looking better then person x, or having those ripped abs for summer, and becomes focused individually on yourself, and on BBing goals.

    Now, most would assume this means you begin competing or intend to compete, but I do not believe this is always the case. I know many lifters who for all intents and purposes are large, ripped, BBrs, but do not compete. Most have once, found they hated it, and moved on. Competition in BBing is a strange thing. It's uniquely detached and removed from the actual day to day efforts of the life. You train and diet to develop the physique, but then the actual competition is a beauty pageant which has nothing to do with training. Thus one can love training and developing your body, but not be too found of painting yourself orange and flexing on a stage.

    True BBing is not about looking better then anyone else and is not as self-centered and egotistical as most believe. Its about taking your body and literally morphing it into something else. It's the journey, the hours and hours spent under the bar, training, puking and passing out to get those last few reps, knowing it's what you need to do to reach your goal. The diet, the discipline, it's a form of meditation. SF79 said it very well: "When it is just me and the iron, nothing else matters in the world. It's my moment of zen even when I have to pull myself up from the leg press because my quads are too fried to support my weight."

    To BBrs it's more then a hobby, it impacts and is every part of your life. What you eat, when you sleep, how you move, how you think. When your friends ask you out for the night the first thing you think about is how much food you need to bring, and how/where you can eat it. You bring a beach cooler to work to fit all the meals (and pack an extra just in case you get stuck, missing a meal is unthinkable). You miss social events to train, you eat things, not because they taste remotely good, but because they will help reach your goal.

    Yes we're a little obsessed, but that's the sport and we love it. People jump off bridges, climb mountains, and do all number and manor of crazy things. But they do it because they love it, it's part of them and they wouldn't want it any other way.