NASA Probe Finds Ice and Organics on Mercury

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 30, 2012 1:03 AM GMT
    http://blogs.discovery.com/inscider/2012/11/nasa-mercury-announcement.html#mkcpgn=fbsci1
  • Bicuriouscool

    Posts: 233

    Nov 30, 2012 4:27 AM GMT
    Thats ridiculous, mercury is so close to sun that it cant even support water vapour, leave alone ice
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Nov 30, 2012 4:31 AM GMT
    Bicuriouscool saidThats ridiculous, mercury is so close to sun that it cant even support water vapour, leave alone ice



    next time read the article, and it might tell you.

    "But that's crazy, right? How could there be ice on the closest planet to the sun? It turns out the deep craters shade anything inside from the sun's rays, keeping the temperature cool enough to allow ice to form. It's even possible that liquid water exists on the planet somewhere under the ice!"
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    Nov 30, 2012 4:35 AM GMT
    calibro said
    Bicuriouscool saidThats ridiculous, mercury is so close to sun that it cant even support water vapour, leave alone ice



    next time read the article, and it might tell you.

    "But that's crazy, right? How could there be ice on the closest planet to the sun? It turns out the deep craters shade anything inside from the sun's rays, keeping the temperature cool enough to allow ice to form. It's even possible that liquid water exists on the planet somewhere under the ice!"


    Lemme get you some ice from mercury for that burn, brah.
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    Nov 30, 2012 4:48 AM GMT
    MuonOver said
    calibro said
    Bicuriouscool saidThats ridiculous, mercury is so close to sun that it cant even support water vapour, leave alone ice



    next time read the article, and it might tell you.

    "But that's crazy, right? How could there be ice on the closest planet to the sun? It turns out the deep craters shade anything inside from the sun's rays, keeping the temperature cool enough to allow ice to form. It's even possible that liquid water exists on the planet somewhere under the ice!"




    Lemme get you some ice from mercury for that burn, brah.



    +1
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    Nov 30, 2012 5:49 AM GMT
    Space is near absolute zero -459 f degrees. So if you are shielded from
    the sun it's gonna be cold. Space has little matter to conduct heat as air does.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Nov 30, 2012 5:29 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidSpace is near absolute zero -459 f degrees. So if you are shielded from
    the sun it's gonna be cold. Space has little matter to conduct heat as air does.


    more science fail from you. one, space has no temperature. radiation in space causes a measurable temperature, which is typically at 2.7K if left alone to cool infinitely. two, you seem to have no fundamental understanding of mercury or thermodynamics. mercury isn't space with cosmic radiation. even at its coldest, it's at about 72K. and i say coldest because at its hottest it is at 700K. average temp is about 452K. mercury's wide distribution of temperatures results from the fact that it virtually has no atmosphere, so its close proximity to the sun cooks it. how you have any idea of space's temperature functions here i don't know. however, mercury has an odd cycle around the sun such that while it only takes comparably short time to rotate the sun compared to our year, it takes much, much longer for it to complete a planetary rotation compared to our day. as such, so much of the planet is either exposed to great heat or no heat (and without an atmosphere, that heat is lost quickly). still, by virtue of physics, the planet maintains a temperature a great deal warmer than an object left to cool in space. being shielded from the sun isn't the answer as much as without an atmosphere whatever is not in direct sunlight will avoid direct heating and will only warm via thermal conduction.
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    Dec 02, 2012 7:30 AM GMT
    calibro said
    Alpha13 saidSpace is near absolute zero -459 f degrees. So if you are shielded from
    the sun it's gonna be cold. Space has little matter to conduct heat as air does.


    more science fail from you. one, space has no temperature. radiation in space causes a measurable temperature, which is typically at 2.7K if left alone to cool infinitely. two, you seem to have no fundamental understanding of mercury or thermodynamics. mercury isn't space with cosmic radiation. even at its coldest, it's at about 72K. and i say coldest because at its hottest it is at 700K. average temp is about 452K. mercury's wide distribution of temperatures results from the fact that it virtually has no atmosphere, so its close proximity to the sun cooks it. how you have any idea of space's temperature functions here i don't know. however, mercury has an odd cycle around the sun such that while it only takes comparably short time to rotate the sun compared to our year, it takes much, much longer for it to complete a planetary rotation compared to our day. as such, so much of the planet is either exposed to great heat or no heat (and without an atmosphere, that heat is lost quickly). still, by virtue of physics, the planet maintains a temperature a great deal warmer than an object left to cool in space. being shielded from the sun isn't the answer as much as without an atmosphere whatever is not in direct sunlight will avoid direct heating and will only warm via thermal conduction.


    Ehh...Mercury has continuously replenished atmosphere. And you would've been better off explaining this using electrodynamics rather than thermodynamics [*coughcoughpoyntingvectorcoughcough*]