Sailing Away From It All

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2012 6:27 AM GMT
    I happened to come across a blog a couple of days ago, written by a young guy who quit his job and spent four years rambling around the world and sailing up and down the west coast and to Hawaii and back. Basically, the kid has been living my retirement, except he didn't wait until he was too old to enjoy it. And didn't spend a fortune doing it either.

    (I have to say the guy is better at camera work then he is at writing, but it helps that he and his friends are pretty easy on the eyes.)



    What caught my attention was that he bought a cheap old boat and without spending a fortune outfitting it with all the gear that you "need" to have, just went out and sailed it. In fact, it's exactly like my boat - which everyone says is too small to cross oceans - only his is the next smaller model.

    Anyhow if you go through the blog, he's had an amazing adventure.

    Who has thought about or plans to head out on an extended voyage? Or has already done so?

    I suppose that If I liquidated everything except my boat tomorrow, I could go live like that for the rest of my life. I dunno though... a month or two yes, but I don't know if I could dive and surf every day.
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Dec 01, 2012 12:52 PM GMT
    I think about it all time. But I wont quit my job or sell my house or anything. l love my job (to some degree) and I enjoy thing life have to offer(bf, house, food , music and adventure). If those adventures side of me surfacing. I usually do some back packing or ride my motorbike to some strange places.

    Probably I do those when I retire or no longer working. Travelling wise, I have been to so many country.
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    Dec 01, 2012 5:41 PM GMT
    Most people wait until they're about 70 to cast off. After first putting $100,000 or more into a big hyper-equiped boat. And there are news stories almost every month where they give up in mid voyage because they get sick or scared. Many of those beautiful yachts get abandoned in mid ocean.

    If you're going to do it, there is something to be said for doing it while you are young and strong. This guy did it on a $5000 boat, which he wrecked a couple of times along the way, but just bounced back.

    There is something to be said for always having a home on dry land to come back to. This guy has his parent's house. If I had done this instead of grad school, I'd have had the farm as home base. But now my parents are gone and it's only me holding down the farm. If I took off now, there would be no more "home base."
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Dec 01, 2012 5:43 PM GMT


    /...and I'm out.
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    Dec 01, 2012 7:15 PM GMT
    My last bud and I planned the life for years, were shopping boats, he was winding down his career, I had quit mine and was tending to mom at the end of her life, then we were to sail the world for the rest of our lives.

    But while watching mom die, he died. Damn it. Still hurts.

    Though my bud was not previously a boater as was my first (our parents who introduced me & my first bud were boating buddies in the same club and also involved in Coast Guard Aux.) who would have relished the life hadn't he also died too soon (yeah, I sure can pick'm), after spending time with me and my family, he started to take to the idea of life on the water (I lived aboard for a while with my folks as a kid).

    But he would have been downsizing from a 5000 sq ft Hollywood Hills home and kept getting excited about the bigger boats whereas I was insisting on something actually manageable.

    I'd decided for us on Cheoy Lee, my longtime favorite as a liveaboard, world capable cruiser. Only my bud wanted the big one...

    CL53_1.jpg

    which is stunning, of course, but not having spent time on the water he had no idea how much boat that really is.

    My choice was the 43 and I was very close to buying one when the price dropped just under $150k, though it did need about 20 into it easy. There were no flybridge versions available when I was shopping them (I've only ever seen two for sale) but here's the one I think is so cool...

    CL43_1.jpg

    My other very favorite is the Baba (later sometimes aka Panda--I think the copy version) originally designed by Robert Perry (I've chatted with the designer about his very wonderful boat) and looked at one in St. Pete which had just that week sold to some lucky sailor who got to it first. The 40 pilothouse version is freaking excellent. Gorgeous lines on that thing.

    b40P-full.jpg

    After burying everyone--now without a job, without a mom, without my bud, what the fuck just happened to me--I still considered living aboard and sailing the world but decided that would reduce my chances of finding another partner some day and I was too sad to be that alone for those long stretches. But for that time of consideration I was looking into something in the 30 ft range like the little Baba which probably goes for about $60k or I also love the Pacific Seacraft, another great boat.

    PSC31_DP_02.jpg

    Deciding to stay on land I thought to maybe relocate to SE Asia and expat life for a while. But to see if I'd like even that I tried traveling a little just in the states and found I didn't like it. I think in my 20s/30s I would have had a blast doing that. But I just wound up hanging out in hotel rooms. It was stupid. So I relocated to a new property to fix that up and go back to school and start a new career. I have landlocked myself but my dreams are still out there.


    O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
    The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won;
    The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
    While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:
    But O heart! heart! heart!
    O the bleeding drops of red,
    Where on the deck my Captain lies,
    Fallen cold and dead.

    O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
    Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills;
    For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths--for you the shores a-crowding;
    For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
    Here Captain! dear father!
    This arm beneath your head;
    It is some dream that on the deck,
    You've fallen cold and dead.

    My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
    My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
    The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
    From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
    Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
    But I, with mournful tread,
    Walk the deck my Captain lies,
    Fallen cold and dead.
    ~~Walt Whitman
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2012 7:32 PM GMT
    I did it 10 years ago, across to NZ and back, wa very eye-opening. I have since sold her

    http://theyachtjosephine.com/
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    Dec 01, 2012 7:39 PM GMT
    Roguewave saidI did it 10 years ago, across to NZ and back, wa very eye-opening. I have since sold her

    http://theyachtjosephine.com/


    The Hans Christian is another great boat. She looks beautiful. Must have killed you to sell.

    I am partial to pilothouse versions, however. Here's some boat porn...
    2294401_1.jpg
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    Dec 01, 2012 7:43 PM GMT
    theantijock said
    Roguewave saidI did it 10 years ago, across to NZ and back, wa very eye-opening. I have since sold her

    http://theyachtjosephine.com/


    The Hans Christian is another great boat. She looks beautiful. Must have killed you to sell.


    It did but after a 3-year long voyage I just couldn't have her sit in the slip for a little outing on the bay on weekends. He is very happy now in Hawaii
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2012 7:46 PM GMT
    Roguewave said
    theantijock said
    Roguewave saidI did it 10 years ago, across to NZ and back, wa very eye-opening. I have since sold her

    http://theyachtjosephine.com/


    The Hans Christian is another great boat. She looks beautiful. Must have killed you to sell.


    It did but after a 3-year long voyage I just couldn't have her sit in the slip for a little outing on the bay on weekends. He is very happy now in Hawaii


    Ya, not a boat to just sit there. It's insane the number of boats in marinas that never leave their slips.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2012 7:53 PM GMT
    theantijock said
    Roguewave said
    theantijock said
    Roguewave saidI did it 10 years ago, across to NZ and back, wa very eye-opening. I have since sold her

    http://theyachtjosephine.com/


    The Hans Christian is another great boat. She looks beautiful. Must have killed you to sell.


    It did but after a 3-year long voyage I just couldn't have her sit in the slip for a little outing on the bay on weekends. He is very happy now in Hawaii


    Ya, not a boat to just sit there. It's insane the number of boats in marinas that never leave their slips.


    Yeah I call them floating RV's
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2012 9:50 PM GMT
    theantijock saidMy last bud and I planned the life for years, were shopping boats, he was winding down his career, I had quit mine and was tending to mom at the end of her life, then we were to sail the world for the rest of our lives.

    But while watching mom die, he died. Damn it. Still hurts.


    After burying everyone--now without a job, without a mom, without my bud, what the fuck just happened to me--I still considered living aboard and sailing the world but decided that would reduce my chances of finding another partner some day and I was too sad to be that alone for those long stretches.


    Interesting how a brush with death sank your plans. According to the above-mentioned blog, it was the death of a friend and the stark glimpse of mortality that spurred that guy out of the cubicle and out to sea.
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    Dec 02, 2012 12:04 AM GMT
    mindgarden said
    theantijock saidMy last bud and I planned the life for years, were shopping boats, he was winding down his career, I had quit mine and was tending to mom at the end of her life, then we were to sail the world for the rest of our lives.

    But while watching mom die, he died. Damn it. Still hurts.


    After burying everyone--now without a job, without a mom, without my bud, what the fuck just happened to me--I still considered living aboard and sailing the world but decided that would reduce my chances of finding another partner some day and I was too sad to be that alone for those long stretches.


    Interesting how a brush with death sank your plans. According to the above-mentioned blog, it was the death of a friend and the stark glimpse of mortality that spurred that guy out of the cubicle and out to sea.


    I learned to navigate as a kid so I know how to read a chart to find the hazards. What I find even more interesting is how you've got such a negative view of me. What the chart doesn't tell me is whether you save that perception just for me or is that your general outlook of anyone who isn't you? I'd hate to think you were treating me special.

    You're comparing very different circumstances. Mine wasn't a brush with death; it was an inundation: mom, my bud and my pup, the three greatest loves of my life then, all at about the same time. You're brushing that off as a brush? I couldn't believe what life had thrown my way. Then, while mourning, some of my closest friends betrayed me when I was unable to tend to their usual needy selves. Combined, that all devastated me. It's taking me years to pull myself out of that shit and I'm still working on it. That you could just brush that off if that was your experience? Well, good for you. But I still love them. I can't just deep six it.

    Plus I'd already been widowed once before by my first bud and he and I were probably in boats more than on dry land. When he died, I unconsciously stayed away from boats and the water for about half a year with my parents and his living right on the water. I still remember that very first time I saw water after he died, I was driving over the intracoastal,and I couldn't figure out how I'd avoided it for so long.

    So by now most of the people I used to boat with are dead. I did a water taxi with some friends two years back and I started crying. A friend in Sarasota likes to take me out on his bay boat and I try my best to have a good time but I step aboard and I get sad. I think if it was a love situation, if I had my captain again, I'd be fine. But I can't do this shit on my own. I love it but I can't do it just for me.

    Each time life falls apart I try picking myself back up but each time it gets harder. Can't just brush it off. Like I said I did consider singlehandling a smaller vessel but then there's the age thing to consider too. I'm not in my 20s/30s anymore. You can take 10 years off then, easy, like your little blog friend did, come back, and life is still there for you. But take off on your own in your 50s for 10 years? When you come back the only thing there for you is arthritis. Try climbing a stick with that. Look out below.

    You want to judge me? There. Now you've got some background. Judge that. My plans were to sail with my buddy. My bud died. Or should I have just sailed off with his corpse strapped to the deck. O Captain, my Captain.


    When I awoke this morning
    I dove beneath my floating home
    Down below her graceful side in the turning tide
    To watch the sea fish roam

  • TheAlchemixt

    Posts: 2294

    Dec 02, 2012 12:20 AM GMT
    I just finished backpacking asia for 7 months. I leave for Latin America tomorrow at 6 A.M. I have a one way ticket and I don't know when I plan on finishing this Latin America trip, I'm trying to make this one more than 7 months. I think it would be fun on a boat but I don't know anything about those. icon_neutral.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 02, 2012 12:52 AM GMT
    Whoah there. I wasn't implying "judgement" of anybody. Just reflecting that death of someone close to us has a profound effect on everybody, and causes many people to change the direction of their lives.
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    Dec 02, 2012 3:29 AM GMT
    Thank you for your clarification and I appreciate your finding meaning in how we experience what we experience. Perhaps I misunderstood your juxtiposing "a brush with death sank your plans" with "...the stark glimpse of mortality that spurred that guy ... out to sea. " whereby not only was losing my life partner of 10 years but a "brush with death" while his loss of his friend was a "stark glimpse of mortality" (to my ear, haha, much more dramatic than my loss), but that he experienced death as a motivator in life (what a positive guy he is) whereas I must have just let death ruin my plans (what a stick in the mud am my). I'll take your word at face value that there was no judgment there, though I find it hard to read that sentence without seeing at least some even if not consciously intended.

    That might simply be my paranoia of believing I've spotted a pattern, particularly with regard to your recently expressing in the full moon thread that you didn't think I might know the sun has anything to do with a tide or lunar lighting.

    Either way, here's the whole kicker of why I took that as judgement: Death did not influence my changing my plans because my bud not being dead was the plan. That's not influence; that's actual. I didn't need to reflect at all; the problem was that fucking plan died. It isn't as if I'd been planning to do this without him and that his death made any sort of change to some plan that didn't include him. I'm okay alone and with the right man I don't hardly need anyone else but on my own I tend to participate in community, not fish. (And yes there is a boating community but it's even more hetero, just by the numbers/ratios than being land-based.)

    That I did consider singlehandling after his death I'm certain was nothing more than the momentum of having planned with him for so many years. And it was so close to fruition. I still can't believe what the fuck happened. I'm not sailing not by any reflecting upon his death but on my reflection of my life as I find it. That without him I have to build a new one. I could go back into publishing but if I work on a new career now, I'll have an interesting life into my 60s-80s or 90s depending on how well this bod holds out. If I took off cruising now, in 10 years I'm afraid I'd be up shit's creek without a paddle while he's having fun crossing the River Styx. I never planned on separate boats.

    So you are right that death can have a profound effect which can cause change in the direction of lives. But sometimes we just change directions because someone left a corpse in the way. Hard-a-port!
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    Dec 02, 2012 5:03 PM GMT
    As long as your boat is well founded and you take measured risks almost any sized boat will do. My brother and his wife back in the late 80's sailed an Alberg 30 from Toronto to New Zealand. I was fortunate enough to be able to join them in Venezuela and sail to Tahiti. We lived on a shoestring ! I remember begging (in Spanish) for water from a mini cruise ship in the Galapagos!

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    Oct 23, 2015 4:52 AM GMT
    Sort of a book report. Sort of fits this old thread. Sort of an old book.

    "Dove" by Robin Lee Graham. The story of a 16 year old boy who dropped out of high school and sailed around the world by himself in a 24-foot boat from 1965 to 1970.

    I hadn't read this in many, many years. But one of the issues of National Geographic with his pics in it floated to the top of the moldering mouse-eaten pile in the old tractor shed and hooked me in again. (Best selling issue of all time. Not just for the cute kid... also featured Apollo 8 Astronauts.)

    dove.jpg

    Not exactly great literature. But what can you expect from an "as told to by" book from a high school drop-out? But man, what an adventure. Worth spending a Sunday on. Brief. Terse. More about the places he stopped than about the journey. Already a world that has been lost in time. Now it's so much smaller and more dangerous. And my old-fart self probably has a different perspective on it than my teen-self did.

    Of course, he would never have been able to do it if he didn't have rich parents. Already at 16, he had lots of sailing experience, including a year at sea with his family. And National Geographic would never have (eventually) put up all that money if he weren't a very photogenic kid. Still, he made it most of the way across the Pacific with $70 in his pocket, two cats, no shoes, and a smile.

    9e60fa1de0c4faa936a4d1f026850a3a.jpg

    117034.jpg

    5f442d61ba1ebb64c86f3d8557f7ac50.jpg

    1049994.jpg

    617424.jpg
    It's odd that he never talks much about the time at sea, except for notable storms and mishaps. There isn't a single word about the Atlantic Ocean. (Probably by then, he was getting bored of the book project.) When people asked him what he was thinking about, at sea, he always puts them off. Didn't seem to read much. Ignored the school books his parents sent along. Hmm... we can guess though. Sixteen year-old boy, naked in the tropics all day with nothing to do. I suspect days on end of furious self abuse! (But maybe that's just me.)

    Of course he meets a girl. Well... cute kid like that, met lots of girls, but one in particular. And he kind of went crazy toward the end. Almost abandoned the voyage and ran off with the girl. Got the girl pregnant. Had to be bribed to finish the last leg. National Geographic gave him a brand new yacht. Ford gave him a new car (well... only a Maverick). Stanford gave him a full-ride scholarship. Then at the end, he gets the Jesus disease, blows it all off, and goes to live in a cabin in Montana. Which, I suppose is not inconsistent with sailing around the world alone.

    Anyhow, this little book packs in a lot of adventure, and maybe the more interesting part is in between the lines.
  • interesting

    Posts: 577

    Mar 04, 2016 7:14 AM GMT
    Was cruising around and saw this post, wow I was mesmerized, yes by the story, the boy was meh. So I went out and searched to see if the guy was still interviewing and found this article back in 2010.

    http://www.sailmagazine.com/racing/profiles/robin-lee-graham-on-the-latest-teen-circumnavs/

    Very very interesting story, and yes, I thought it was ridiculously his family allowed him to do it. But bravo to him to prove that he did do it.
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    Mar 10, 2016 6:19 AM GMT
    ^ Well, although it was an extraordinary and controversial thing to do, things were a lot different back then. Kids were not so coddled as they are today. Nobody was "driven" to school. Teens had not spent two thirds of their lives watching television... They still knew how to do things.

    And don't forget, for this guy, the alternative was probably to be drafted and spend those years fighting in Viet Nam. Like his brother was doing at the time. Sailing the oceans wasn't so hazardous, compared to that.

    Nowadays, it seems like everyone who is out sailing has a blog. Here's another one:
    http://www.voyageoftherascal.com/blog
    Although this guy only went out for 18 months, and most of the blog is about eating too much food in Mexican restaurants. It's still an interesting read for a Sunday afternoon.

    Most of the voyaging blogs out there are either retired couples or young couples featuring girls in bikinis, or two girls in bikinis. Or families. One of the forums I frequent has a couple of families participating who have been sailing around the world for a couple of years. They're in the middle of the Pacific and yet they're still in the chat rooms every night. Wow, things have changed.

    But I haven't come across any gay guys voyaging blogs, for some reason.icon_confused.gif

    Or a lot of people have written books about it. Which I've grown bored with. Including one of my internet buddies who has just published one about his two month voyage last year. Except the cogent point is if they can do it, you can do it.
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    Mar 10, 2016 6:40 AM GMT
    Plus back then there was the whole "do your own thing" trend. His parents were probably hippies or wannabe hippies.
  • interesting

    Posts: 577

    Mar 15, 2016 12:08 AM GMT
    ^ I believe I read that his Mom even hired a lawyer to try to stop him from doing it, yeah, so even back then, they thought it was crazy.

    ^^ Crazy how technologies have improved so much that you can reach the rest of the world no matter where you are. Nowadays, records are being broken everyday and by people who are getting younger and younger.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1277

    Mar 29, 2016 2:37 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidSort of a book report. Sort of fits this old thread. Sort of an old book.

    "Dove" by Robin Lee Graham. The story of a 16 year old boy who dropped out of high school and sailed around the world by himself in a 24-foot boat from 1965 to 1970.

    I hadn't read this in many, many years. But one of the issues of National Geographic with his pics in it floated to the top of the moldering mouse-eaten pile in the old tractor shed and hooked me in again. (Best selling issue of all time. Not just for the cute kid... also featured Apollo 8 Astronauts.)

    dove.jpg

    Not exactly great literature. But what can you expect from an "as told to by" book from a high school drop-out? But man, what an adventure. Worth spending a Sunday on. Brief. Terse. More about the places he stopped than about the journey. Already a world that has been lost in time. Now it's so much smaller and more dangerous. And my old-fart self probably has a different perspective on it than my teen-self did.

    Of course, he would never have been able to do it if he didn't have rich parents. Already at 16, he had lots of sailing experience, including a year at sea with his family. And National Geographic would never have (eventually) put up all that money if he weren't a very photogenic kid. Still, he made it most of the way across the Pacific with $70 in his pocket, two cats, no shoes, and a smile.

    9e60fa1de0c4faa936a4d1f026850a3a.jpg

    117034.jpg

    5f442d61ba1ebb64c86f3d8557f7ac50.jpg

    1049994.jpg

    617424.jpg
    It's odd that he never talks much about the time at sea, except for notable storms and mishaps. There isn't a single word about the Atlantic Ocean. (Probably by then, he was getting bored of the book project.) When people asked him what he was thinking about, at sea, he always puts them off. Didn't seem to read much. Ignored the school books his parents sent along. Hmm... we can guess though. Sixteen year-old boy, naked in the tropics all day with nothing to do. I suspect days on end of furious self abuse! (But maybe that's just me.)

    Of course he meets a girl. Well... cute kid like that, met lots of girls, but one in particular. And he kind of went crazy toward the end. Almost abandoned the voyage and ran off with the girl. Got the girl pregnant. Had to be bribed to finish the last leg. National Geographic gave him a brand new yacht. Ford gave him a new car (well... only a Maverick). Stanford gave him a full-ride scholarship. Then at the end, he gets the Jesus disease, blows it all off, and goes to live in a cabin in Montana. Which, I suppose is not inconsistent with sailing around the world alone.

    Anyhow, this little book packs in a lot of adventure, and maybe the more interesting part is in between the lines.


    I want to read this book after reading this thread. Sounds really interesting. How cool was it that he actually went out and did something most of us only dream of doing.
  • Jeepguy2

    Posts: 164

    Apr 27, 2016 3:16 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidSort of a book report. Sort of fits this old thread. Sort of an old book.

    "Dove" by Robin Lee Graham. The story of a 16 year old boy who dropped out of high school and sailed around the world by himself in a 24-foot boat from 1965 to 1970.

    I hadn't read this in many, many years. But one of the issues of National Geographic with his pics in it floated to the top of the moldering mouse-eaten pile in the old tractor shed and hooked me in again. (Best selling issue of all time. Not just for the cute kid... also featured Apollo 8 Astronauts.)

    dove.jpg

    Not exactly great literature. But what can you expect from an "as told to by" book from a high school drop-out? But man, what an adventure. Worth spending a Sunday on. Brief. Terse. More about the places he stopped than about the journey. Already a world that has been lost in time. Now it's so much smaller and more dangerous. And my old-fart self probably has a different perspective on it than my teen-self did.

    Of course, he would never have been able to do it if he didn't have rich parents. Already at 16, he had lots of sailing experience, including a year at sea with his family. And National Geographic would never have (eventually) put up all that money if he weren't a very photogenic kid. Still, he made it most of the way across the Pacific with $70 in his pocket, two cats, no shoes, and a smile.

    9e60fa1de0c4faa936a4d1f026850a3a.jpg

    117034.jpg

    5f442d61ba1ebb64c86f3d8557f7ac50.jpg

    1049994.jpg

    617424.jpg
    It's odd that he never talks much about the time at sea, except for notable storms and mishaps. There isn't a single word about the Atlantic Ocean. (Probably by then, he was getting bored of the book project.) When people asked him what he was thinking about, at sea, he always puts them off. Didn't seem to read much. Ignored the school books his parents sent along. Hmm... we can guess though. Sixteen year-old boy, naked in the tropics all day with nothing to do. I suspect days on end of furious self abuse! (But maybe that's just me.)

    Of course he meets a girl. Well... cute kid like that, met lots of girls, but one in particular. And he kind of went crazy toward the end. Almost abandoned the voyage and ran off with the girl. Got the girl pregnant. Had to be bribed to finish the last leg. National Geographic gave him a brand new yacht. Ford gave him a new car (well... only a Maverick). Stanford gave him a full-ride scholarship. Then at the end, he gets the Jesus disease, blows it all off, and goes to live in a cabin in Montana. Which, I suppose is not inconsistent with sailing around the world alone.

    Anyhow, this little book packs in a lot of adventure, and maybe the more interesting part is in between the lines.



    Back when I was a teen my grandmother moved to a new house and gave us a huge stack of old National Geographic from the 1940s 50s, and 60s, and I remember reading this story and thinking he was HOTT! I wonder where he is now, if he is still alive or if he has died of skin cancer from lying around naked in the tropics during his teens.

    An old guy named Harry Heckel that my grandad worked with in a lab at Allied Chemical sailed a 35ft Lord Nelson around the world twice after he retired. I remember there was an article about him in the local newspaper after he completed his second circumnavigation and tied up at a local marina. The news reporter asked him why he decided to sail around the world twice, and he said he really wasn't planning on circumnavigating either time. He just decided to go sailing and he got so far away from home that it was a shorter distance to sail on around the globe than to turn around and sail back home the way he came. LOL

    His memoir, Around the World in 80 Years—The Oldest Man to Sail Alone Around the World—Twice! was published in 2013.

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    Apr 27, 2016 3:27 AM GMT
    Don't forget Bernard Moitessier, who would have won the first round-the-world solo yacht race, but slingshot a letter of resignation onto the deck of a passing freighter, and went the fuck around again.

    Bernard_Moitessier_Golden_Globe.jpg

    And yes, Robin Graham is still around. He is occasionally interviewed in the sailing press. As far as I know, he and his wife still live in the cabin in Montana.
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    Apr 27, 2016 3:33 AM GMT
    Sigh. I wish I could sail. I took lessons about 20 years ago but haven't done anything since. My significant other refuses to step on any boat and when I floated the idea of me taking sailing lessons this years i somehow created a s-storm "(...too expensive...waste of money... You'll be be doing something EVERY weekend without ME..."). icon_rolleyes.gif

    Sigh...